Transgenic Mice Advice?

Wolfgang Schechinger hubahopp at gmx.de
Sat Dec 11 14:09:45 EST 2004


limit. The "diary of secrets," so
reminiscent of Mary Meyer (discussed in Part One of this article)
would suggest Angleton.

Capell was drawn up on charges in 1965. The charges were rather
fatal to the tale told in his RFK pamphlet: conspiracy to commit
libel. One would have thought this discreditation was enough to
impale the tale. And it probably would have been had it not been
for Norman Mailer. In 1973, Mailer published a book, Marilyn,
(really a photo essay) with the assistance of longtime FBI asset
on the Kennedy assassination Larry Schiller. He recirculated the
tale again, inserting a new twist. He added the possibility that
the FBI and/or the CIA might have been involved in the murder in
order to blackmail Bobby ( p. 242). In 1973, pre-Rupert Murdoch,
the media had some standards. Mailer was excoriated for his
baseless ruminations. In private, he admitted he did what he did
to help pay off a tax debt. He also made a similar confession in
public. When Mike Wallace asked him on 60 Minutes (7/13/73) why
he had to trash Bobby Kennedy, Mailer replied "I needed money
very badly."

Swallowing Slatzer

The worst thing about Mailer's money-grubbing antics was that it
gave an alley to run through to a man who had actually been at
work before Mailer's book was published. In 1972, Robert Slatzer
approached a writer named Will Fowler. Slatzer had been at work
on an article which posited a conspiracy to murder Monroe. Fowler
read it and was unimpressed. He told Slatzer that had he been
married to Monroe, now that would make a real story. Shortly
after, Slatzer got in contact with Fowler again. He said he
forgot to tell him, but he had been married to Monroe. The
"marriage" was a short one: 72 hours. It happened in Mexico on
October 4, 1952. Unfortunately for Slatzer, Spoto found out that
Monroe was in Beverly Hills that day on a shopping spree and she
signed a check dated October 4th to pay for the arti





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