Some questions about Polyacrylamide gels

David L Haviland David.L.Haviland at uth.tmc.edu
Sat Mar 27 10:49:18 EST 2004


Just my $0.02 worth, we had people in the lab that were sensitive to 
butanol, so in a pinch until these people left the lab, we simply use 
distilled water to overlay the gels.   More care must be taken with 
water than butanol as the water, if forcefully added to the gel,  can 
dilute the top part.   But if applied with care, it works just as well.

============ 
David L. Haviland, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Immunology 
University of Texas - Houston, H.S.C. 
Institute of Molecular Medicine, R907 
2121 W. Holcombe Blvd.,  Houston, TX  77030 
713.500.2413-Voice//713.500.2424-FAX 
----------------- 
If everything seems to be going so well, you have obviously 
overlooked something. 
============

----- Original Message -----
From: "Fabio" <fabiodb at katamail.com>
Date: Saturday, March 27, 2004 3:37 am
Subject: Re: Some questions about Polyacrylamide gels

> Il Sun, 07 Mar 2004 21:27:47 +0000, Ferdinando Pucci ha scritto:
> 
> > On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 15:58:11 +0100
> > Fabius <FabioDB#deleteme#@katamail.com> wrote:
> > 
> >> this methods don't work, but in that case why don't work?
> > 
> > I've never done a PAGE, just studied, but an agarose basement 
> isn't useful to
> > pour a PAGE cos it's open to the air: O2 inhibits the 
> crosslinking of
> > acrilamide.
> 
> I supose that I can "cover" the gel with butanol to resolve this 
> problem.
> Thanks
> 
> --Fabio
> 
> 

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