ethidium bromide vapour?

Jayakumar, R R.Jayakumar at roswellpark.org
Sun Sep 11 12:01:44 EST 2005


The technique you describe is the preparatin of prestained agarose gels.  But actually it is never added to nearly boiling agarose.  The agarose is cooled till you can tolerate the temperature for 10 sec on your palm (should be about 50-60C).  Add ethidium bromde stock (10 mg/ml) 1 ul for 50 ml of solution.  Pour them into casting trays and allow to solidify.  You can add even less if the gel fluoresces badly.  Remember you cant destain prestained gels very easily.  
   Remember to dispose off the gel and all solutions that comes into contact with it carefully according to biohazard disposal procedures of your institute.
   I hope that helps. 
jai


-----Original Message-----
From: methods-bounces at oat.bio.indiana.edu
[mailto:methods-bounces at oat.bio.indiana.edu]On Behalf Of jg374 at cam.ac.uk
Sent: Saturday, September 10, 2005 6:01 PM
To: methods at magpie.bio.indiana.edu
Subject: ethidium bromide vapour?


A couple of people in our lab add ethidium bromide solution to hot agarose 
(i.e. nearly boiling), and claim that ethidium bromide cannot escape as a 
gas so there is no danger. This runs contrary to everything else I have 
heard, which says the agarose solution should be left to cool first, or 
the etbr added in a fume cupboard. Obviously this later method seems to be the 
safest, but is there any merit to their claim?



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