Calculating Protein Concentration

Jayakumar, R via methods%40net.bio.net (by R.Jayakumar from roswellpark.org)
Mon Jan 21 13:19:18 EST 2008


 
Dear Yvonne
    Firstly, congratulations on your graduation.  Secondly, dont take
the advice given by members of this forum in a negative manner. If it
was asked by someone from some mediocre university in some dark corner
of the world with limited resources, people in this forum would have
jumped head over heels to help without criticisms. But when somebody
from a prestigious institute like Oxford asks that, that raises
eyebrows.  The ability to ask questions however embarassing they might
be and take the answer (sometimes flavored with criticism) in a positive
manner and in the spirit of learning is the hallmark of a successful
scientist. YOu have got the first part right, but not the second part.
We have all received our share of bricks and bats, but we have come out
better for that.
   So what else did we learn here?  In science, the questions you ask
and the ways you adopt to solve those questions will contribute to your
scientific persona. 
   The criticisms AND help you have received reflects the open and
broadminded approach frequently adopted by the esteemed members of this
forum.  Please dont let it discourage you from asking more questions.  I
have been a member of this forum for more than a decade (since my
graduate studies) and I have received bricks as well as flowers and I
have found both extremely useful in improving my outlook, knowledge and
career.  So dont get discouraged. EVeryone has asked such questions once
in a while. Let it go.
   Finally you could not have solved the question by treating it like
Sodium chloride unless otherwise you had known the relation between
dalton, carbon's molar mass and mole. 
Jay



-----Original Message-----
From: methods-bounces from oat.bio.indiana.edu
[mailto:methods-bounces from oat.bio.indiana.edu] On Behalf Of Yvonne Couch
Sent: Monday, January 21, 2008 3:41 AM
To: methods from magpie.bio.indiana.edu
Subject: RE: Calculating Protein Concentration

Hi guys,
First off thanks to all who gave me help, much appreciated since nobody
in the lab could help.  Second of all if someone had told me to treat it
like sodium chloride I too would have been able to do the maths.
Finally I only graduated last year and it's not something I have ever
had to do before and the spirit of unfriendliness which has greeted my
question doesn't really prompt me to ask more, how do you expect people
to learn the basics if they don't ask?  And how are they meant to ask if
all they're going to get is patronized?
Y.

-----Original Message-----
From: methods-bounces from oat.bio.indiana.edu
[mailto:methods-bounces from oat.bio.indiana.edu] On Behalf Of Terran
Sent: 18 January 2008 22:08
To: methods from magpie.bio.indiana.edu
Subject: Re: Calculating Protein Concentration

I too thought this question seemed so silly, and to investigate the
simplicity of the answer:

 

I searched "Dalton definition" at www.google.com
<http://www.google.com/> 

 

Looking for an .edu site I found:

 

Dalton = measure of molecular weight or mass. One hydrogen atom has mass
of
1 Da. Proteins and other macromolecule molecular weights are usually
measured in kDa or kD (kilodaltons) - 1000 Da. From
(http://www.biochem.northwestern.edu
<http://www.biochem.northwestern.edu/>
)

 

I didn't know the exact answer in the beginning, but from the definition
it is a simple conversion problem.  

 

Freshmen with general chemistry could solve this.  Simple laziness.

 

~Terran

 

Graduate student

Chemical and Biological Engineering Dept

South Dakota School of Mines and Technology

Rapid City, SD 57701

 

-----Original Message-----
From: methods-bounces from oat.bio.indiana.edu
[mailto:methods-bounces from oat.bio.indiana.edu] On Behalf Of WS
Sent: Friday, January 18, 2008 12:45 PM
To: methods from magpie.bio.indiana.edu
Subject: Re: Calculating Protein Concentration

 

Dear AK,

 

seems that even at famous Oxford either the students or the teaching

have become worse...

 

Actually, this stuff is a sort of "first day, first lesson's

knowledge" in

almost any subject related to natural science. More to worry, a PhD

(!) student in my lab asked me exactly the same question a few days

ago, too. The funny thing is, when I told him to treat the problem the

same way as to make a sodium chloride solution, he could solve the

problem instantly.

 

What makes me especially worry is that this kind of questions in this

NG constantly seems to increase. I do not think it just lazyness, as

for a newbie to find this NG on the web, usually, you need to have

done some googling before on behalf of your actual problem. My

impression is that many of those girls&guys really don't know how to

solve their problems and somehow manage to discover the bionet.

 

Hey students, please comment on this, your opinion and experience is

wanted here!!! Did nobody teach you these things, do you not know

where to find this kind of textbooks and lessens or are you really

just lazy?

 

Hey experts, is there any book/website/pdf/etc like {Mathematics,

Chemistry, Logical Thinking, Statistics, Planning Experiments and

Evaluating Experimental Data} in {Biochemistry, Molecular Biology,

Life Science} for Dummies?

 

Any ideas?

 

Wo

 

 

On 18 Jan., 18:40, "AK" <akhan... from sbcglobal.net> wrote:

> It is amazing to me that this basic question was honored here, perhaps
since

> she is from Oxford. I remember not too long ago a student was hammered

> to

> death because of asking a basic question of plant extraction. UNFAIR.

> AK

 

 

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