quantifying PCR bands

Jayakumar, R via methods%40net.bio.net (by R.Jayakumar from roswellpark.org)
Fri Feb 18 09:18:28 EST 2011


Try using ImageJ.  It is a standard scientific way of quantifying bands.  But if you have access to a laser densitometer, then that is the best way to do it with the Imagequant software (in the case of molecular dynamics model). Otherwise, it is scientifically acceptable to use ImageJ or Scion Image.  ImageJ is available from NIH.  Google it.  It also has a nice help documentation online (click on help inside the software).  It will take you a while tolearn it, but then it is easy.   
   It is NOT ACCEPTABLE in publications to use photoshop for any purpose other than reducing size of image or cropping images, since it is an image editing software and it can raise suspicions for data manipulation.
    
Jay


-----Original Message-----
From: methods-bounces from oat.bio.indiana.edu [mailto:methods-bounces from oat.bio.indiana.edu] On Behalf Of Pragnya Das
Sent: Thursday, February 17, 2011 2:23 PM
To: methods from magpie.bio.indiana.edu
Subject: quantifying PCR bands

I want to quantitate the bands from a Western Blot (X-ray film) and a PCR
gel (Thermal paper). How can I do that. I have heard people using Photoshop
to qunatitate. Is it scientifically accepted. If so, how do I proceed after
scanning the films? I know a lot of labs use ImageJ software.

Your suggestions will be greatly appreciated

PD
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