Bacteria in human nose

Candace Krepel ckrepel at post.its.mcw.edu
Fri Sep 16 09:04:16 EST 1994


michael "breed" breedveld (MWB6 at psuvm.psu.edu) wrote:

: Many bacterai and fungi grow on thie rich medium. However, it is an effective c
: ontra-indicator for R. leguminosarum, since this organism does NOT grow on it.

According to Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology (vol. 1, 1984),
Rhizobium leguminosarum "normally causes formation of root nodules on some,
but not necessarily all, species of Pisum (field pea), Lathyrus (pea), Vicia
(vetch), Lens (lentil), temperate species of Phaseolus (P. vulgaris (kidney
bean), P. angustifolius (bean), P. multiflorus (scarlet runner)) and
Trifolium (clover)."

Since none of these plants are likely to be found in the human nose (except
perhaps on a transient basis with young children <g>), the fact that
Rhizobium will not grow on BHI is a moot point for this experiment.

Candy Krepel
Surgical Microbiology Research Lab
Medical College of Wisconsin



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