FOOD MICRO QUESTION

K N and P J Harris ecoli at cix.compulink.co.uk
Mon Apr 15 01:12:34 EST 1996


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> bionet/microbiology #2694, from pmars at en.com, 904 chars, Thu  11 Apr 
1996 21:10:50 -0
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> Subject: FOOD MICRO QUESTION
> Date: Thu, 11 Apr 1996 21:10:50 -0400
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> When I was taking a food micro course back in college (Ohio State 
'69),
> the professor pulled out a scuzzy looking gallon bottle filled with
> vinegar.  He called it "mother of vinegar"......seems all you had to 
do
> was keep adding old wine to it periodically and you would have a
> continuous supply of good wine vinegar. Any idea where I can get 
cultures
> for starting something like this?
> 
>    Marty Gross
Hello Marty,
All you need is an Acetobacter. They are not that uncommon - as anyone 
who tries home winemaking will attest.
You might try looking for some "organic vinegar" that has not been 
pasteurised, this will often have the tell-tale signs of swirls of 
cellulose lurking in the bottom. Otherwise try leaving some white wine 
around in shallow containers and wait for providence to provide. The 
appearance of acetic acid should be pretty obvious.
Peter Harris, Reading, UK.




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