Need Help With Experiment

Jeffrey Lee lee at SOL.ESSEX.EDU
Mon Apr 15 08:29:49 EST 1996


"Terry":
     Try streaking for individual colonies on a Nutrient agar plate and 
leaving the plate at room temperature. The S. marcescens should have a 
reddish pigment at this temperature. The Staph will not. To differentiate 
S. aureus and S. epidermidis, use a coagulase test. S. aureus is 
coagulase positive and S. epidermidis is coagulase negative. Innoculate a 
small tube of plasma with your G+ cocci and incubate in a 37C water bath 
, checking for coagulation every 30 minutes. Hope this helps.
Jeff Lee

SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS
Dr. Jeffrey N. Lee, Biology Dept.                 E-mail:lee at sol.essex.edu
Essex County College                              Phone: (201)-877-3535
Newark, NJ 07102

               "And all this science, I don't understand. 
                  It's just my job, five days a week,"

                       - E. John and B. Taupin - 
SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS


On Mon, 15 Apr 1996, Terry J. Peek wrote:

> I am trying to differentiate between Serratia marcescens and a gram pos. cocci 
> that I suspect is Staph epidermidis or S. aureus. I've placed the culture on 
> 10% NaCl agar. I'll check the results later this morning. What is the best way 
> to seperate these organisms using the resources of a small college lab? Is my 
> first step in the right direction? Any suggestions would be appreciated. 
> Thanks.       Terry
> 
> 



More information about the Microbio mailing list