PAGE

K N and P J Harris ecoli at cix.compulink.co.uk
Fri Mar 1 15:38:11 EST 1996


> ==========
> bionet/microbiology #2156, from jlaveck at cpcug.org, 1272 chars, Thu  29 
Feb 1996 01:16:22 
> ----------
> Article: 3103 of bionet.microbiology
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> From: jlaveck at cpcug.org (Jerry LaVeck)
> Newsgroups: bionet.microbiology
> Subject: Re: PAGE
> Date: Thu, 29 Feb 1996 01:16:22 GMT
> Organization: Express Access Online Communications, USA
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> Message-ID: <3134fccf.973790 at news.digex.net>
> References: <4h1p8j$8bs_001 at leeds.ac.uk>
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> On Wed, 28 Feb 1996 14:35:21 +0000 (GMT), MICMCB at leeds.ac.uk (M.C.
> Bean) wrote:
> 
> >Is anyone else out there, familiar with the experience of pouring a 
> >polyacrylamide gel really carefully, ticking off every step as you do 
it and 
> >it not setting?
> >
> >Matt
> I haven't poured a gel in a loooong time, but I remember having your
> experience a few times.  One cause is oxygen - it inhibits
> polymerization.  You can take care of it by de-gassing the acrylamide
> mixture.  Watch out here - you end up with something that sets up like
> a rock before you get it poured!  The other cause is the catalyst  -
> ammonium persulfate can go bad quickly.  Make up a fresh mixture and
> use it in your next gel.
>     Good luck!
> 
Good idea, that's what I call useful information,
Just about to get involved.
Peter Harris,
reading, UK.




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