phages for extremophiles?

Nicholas Landau nlandau at eden.rutgers.edu
Sat Apr 5 13:20:57 EST 1997


Penguin <penguin at navix.net> writes:

>This is in fact a very reasonable suggestion and numerous researchers
>have been pursuing the field of extremophile phage.  Primarily,
>extemophiles tend to also be members of the Archaea.  Of the archaea,
>the acidophilic hyperthermophile Sulolobus has been found to have
>several, as reported by W. Zillig et al.  Methanogens have also been
>found to have phage of at least one variety, as have the halophiles.  As
>for eubacterial extremophile phage, I'm afraid that's a bit far afield
>of my specialty.

>Penguin

Dear Penguin,

Could you provide citations regarding virus of the archaea?  I have been
working with archaea, addressing ecological questions, and have so far
missed all of these findings.

If, by "extremophile phage," we refer to a phage capable of existing
and remianing infectious under extreme comditions, then these are not
rare.  If we are instead talking about a phage capable of expression
and replication under extreme circumstances (and thus parasitic of
extremophilic bacteria,) then that is a different issue.

Just thought I would write that explicitly, in case any two people on
the thread had differing interpretations.

Nick Landau
Dept. Biochem. & Micro.
Rutgers University
New Brunswick, NJ
nlandau at eden.rutgers.edu



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