suggestions for biochem research?

Excelife excelife at earthlink.net
Wed Aug 12 23:54:58 EST 1998


In article <35CB18DB.3387 at brandeis.edu>, "publicacces$"@brandeis.edu 
says...
>
>I am an undergrad at Brandeis U. who is majoring in both chemistry and
>biochemistry.  I have recently been given the opportunity to work in an
>organic chem lab, and I'm trying to branistorm a project.  One of my
>biggest interests is in the biogenesis of natural products from amino
>acids.  Also interested in the chemical evolution of simple molecules 
to
>larger, more compolex biomolecules, the type of chemistry that became
>the first cell.  As it is difficult to find something that no one else
>has researched and published, I turn to you, the research scientists 
out
>there, who can probably help me come up with something.  Thanks.
>
>-Joe
>
>melenkir at hotmail.com



Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 1998 Aug 4;95(16):9078-9081

Can ends justify the means?: Telomeres and the mechanisms of replicative
senescence and immortalization in mammalian cells.

Sedivy JM

Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, and Biochemistry, Brown
University, Providence, RI 02912.

[Record supplied by publisher]

Finite replicative lifespan, or senescence, of mammalian cells in 
culture
is a phenomenon that has generated much curiosity since its description.
The obvious significance of senescence to organismal aging and the
development of cancer has engendered a long-lasting and lively debate 
about
its mechanisms. Recent discoveries concerning the phenotypes of 
telomerase
knockout mice, the consequences of telomerase reexpression in somatic
cells, and genes that regulate senescence have provided striking 
molecular
insights but also have uncovered important new questions. The objective 
of
this review is to reconcile old observations with new molecular details 
and
to focus attention on the key remaining puzzles.


This paper gives some insight into the direction research into telomeres 
and telomerase is headed.  This research has vast implications for both 
human aging and cancer genesis.

If you want to do some meaningful and productive research I strongly 
recommend this line of scientific investigation.

If you do decide to follow this research I can provide you with some 
groundbreaking reserch projects and possibly also provide the funding.


Thomas Mahoney, Pres.
Lifeline Laboratories, Inc.
http://home.earthlink.net/~excelife/inde.html




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