molecular detection of bacteria

John R. McQuiston zje8 at cdc.gov
Sun Nov 15 13:14:42 EST 1998


I don't see why not.  PCR methods for detecting bacteria have been developed 
for many other organisms, why not plants.  If you're looking for a specific 
bacteria it would be pretty easy but just looking for bacteria in general would 
be a little more complex.  For a quantitative measurement, there are systems 
available like Perkin Elmer's TaqMan system for flourescent quantitation.  
Otherwise you would ahve to develop the detection limit based on copy number 
yourself, which isn't difficult, just time consuming.  

John R. McQuiston
Foodborne Diseases Branch 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta GA




In article <3.0.1.32.19981112135248.006935c8 at pop.unb.ca>, savidge at unb.ca 
says...
>
>I am wondering if it is possible to screen eukaryotic systems (such as
>trees) for bacteria -- both qualitatively to diagnose the presence and
>quantitatively to estimate the number present -- using one or more
>molecular or enzymatic indicators that is highly diagnostic of bacteria?
>I'm familiar with microscopy and plating approaches but would like to
>sidestep those with a direct biochemically based procedure.  Any advice
>would be welcome.
>
>Rod
> **********************************************************************
>   Rod Savidge, PhD, Professor       |         E-mail: savidge at unb.ca
>   Faculty of Forestry and          \|/
>   Environmental Management       \  |  /     Phone:  (506) 453-4919
>   University of New Brunswick    _\/|\/_
>   Fredericton, NB CANADA           \|/        Fax:    (506) 453-3538
>   E3B 6C2                           |
> 
>




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