Second approach to simple questions!

Patrick J. Maher maherp1 at TIGER.UOFS.EDU
Wed Sep 30 19:53:08 EST 1998


This is my answer to how I interpret the question.
One of the other post interpreted the non-plasmatic portion as being the
hydrophobic portion of the membrane, in other words, something inbedded
among the fattyacid tails of the phospholipids ("pegs") would be in the
non-plasmatic phase.  I think this is wrong.. sorry, 
I think what is refered to as the nonplasmatic phases would be those that
are extracellular like.  Let me explain.
Let's say there are two cells, each have only one bilipid membrane and no
internal membranes.  The larger of the two then internalizes the smaller
by making a pocket in it's own membrane and then surrounding it
completely see below

  ______		______		  _______
 /      |              /   ___|		 /  ___  \
|      /  __	      |   / __		|  /__ \  |
|     |  /* \	      |  / /* \		| //* \ \ |
|     |  \__/  --->   |  \ \__/  --->  	| \\__/ / |
\      \              |   \___		|  \___/  /
 \_____/	       \______|		 \_______/
    1                   2			3
The * marks the smaller cell.  lines are bilipid membranes.  The inside of
both the cells are plasmatic.  the outside is nonplasmatic like.  After
the smaller cell is engulfed the space between the two membranes is a
nonplasmatic space inside the cell.  but the inside of the origional cell
is plasmatic as well as the inside of the small cell.  There is a theory
that organelles of eucaryotes evolve in a manner such as this.





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