Oversupply of Ph.D.s in Canada?

wayne conlan wayne.conlan at nrc.ca
Wed Jan 12 13:23:58 EST 2000



Placid Ol' Dingo wrote:

> spotsnall <katzday at tamu.edu> wrote:
>
> > In article <1e4ahov.1ed7f4x1lfjdeyN%pod at karsh.demon.co.uk>,
> > pod at karsh.demon.co.uk says...
> > >
> > >Arthur Sowers <arthures at magpage.com> wrote:
> > >
> >
> > >
> > >Which has absolutely nothing to do with why prospective post-docs who
> > >exhibit bad (or 'non-standard' if you prefer) spelling or grammar *will*
> > >be at a disadvantage when job hunting in a competitive market.
>
> It's connected. jobs for which there was little competition will
> probably be those in which people are treated badly.
>
>

Hi:
   As a Brit who moved to the US a decade ago,then, Canada 3 years ago, I have to
confess that my own spelling has gone completely to pot.  At one time I could
readily differentiate american versus standard english spelling, but the move to
Canada where the latter is the norm, but  where the former is used too, put an
end to that.  Spell checkers aren't necessarily a help here either since none of
them have much of the microbiology jargon incorporated as standard so will tell
me that both haemorrhagic and hemorrhagic (hope I spelt these correctly) are
misspelt (misspelled?).

As to the original question posed by this thread, yes there are too many PhDs
chasing too few jobs here as elsewhere.  However, there are not necessarily too
many good PhDs chasing those jobs.

Finally, Placid, most North Americans pay a small fortune for their
post-secondary education, and so perhaps feel more entitiled to some form of
pay-back than you think they deserve.

Regards,

Wayne.






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