Affinity or dissociation constant?

nobodyz at my-deja.com nobodyz at my-deja.com
Sun Jun 25 09:14:20 EST 2000


Frank:
  My apologies. I didn't clarify: of the two DNA-binding proteins, the
first one that binds stronger to the binding site has the higher
affinity and the second DNA-binding protein has a higher dissociation
constant as a result. i.e. stronger affinity, closer binding; then
imagine a teeter totter, the balance is left with the lesser affinity
or stronger dissociation (like a double negative) therefore weaker
binding to the binding site. Actually, just the logic of the 2 leaves
one stronger than other = other weaker than one. Hope this helps.
» ÑößôÐÝz


In article <8j52fq$hc9$1 at nnrp1.deja.com>,
  nobodyz at my-deja.com wrote:
> Frank
> The affinity of the first protein is higher AND the dissociation
> constant is higher. :)
> » ÑößôÐÝz
>
> In article <8h96h6$una$1 at nnrp2.deja.com>,
>   frankb_1003 at my-deja.com wrote:
> > Hello everybody!
> >
> > My problem is that I havent fully understood what
> > the difference is between affinity and
> > dissociation constant. When there are two DNA-
> > binding proteins and under certain conditions the
> > first one binds stronger to its binding site than
> > the second one: is the affinity of the first
> > protein higher or is the dissociation constant
> > lower or both?
> >
> > I would be thankful for some answers.
> >
> > Frank
> >
> > Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> > Before you buy.
> >
>
> Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> Before you buy.
>


Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.






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