I need help

David Lawton dhlawton at clara.co.uk
Fri Mar 24 20:24:29 EST 2000


It's 1 o'clock in the morning here and I'm doing this because I can't be
bothered to rewrite an SOP for our autoclaves,
so can we leave works like oxymoron out of this. ;o)

With your NaCl example, you're selecting not enriching. If you had a broth
culture then you've selectively enriched.
You mean people look for bacteria that have no human association? ;o))

We could go around in circles here, it's probably not so much how the media
is used as the choice of media, if that makes sense.
The obvious question is, do people use blood agar selectively?

What is R2A agar anyway, probably called something different over here.
--
David Lawton
And the next thing I'll demonstrate is that black is white, white is black
and get killed on the next pedestrian crossing.



"Bryan" <dbd2 at psu.edu> wrote in message news:38DC0C40.82EA3A5E at psu.edu...
> I can agree with your assessment David, however additives can do different
> things.  Say, add lots of NaCl, this would enrich for human associates and
be
> severely toxic to those who's ecology doesn't put them into contact with
high
> salt thus enrichment _and_ selective.  Likewise, if a bug is specialized
in
> environments with _low_ nutrient avaiability (funny, but describing
oligotrophy
> as "posh" term almost sounds like an oxymoron ;}  ) the rich environment
of BAP
> or even TSAYE could be detrimental, thus selective.  My argument is how
you use
> a media can change it's definition.
>
> Regarding growing bugs from air, water and soil samples. I think R2A is a
good
> choice, depending on what you want to achieve.  If you want to see what
type of
> human associates are present, perhaps something more particular e.g., a
> selective or enrichment medium.
>
> -Bryan
>







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