Question...

gcouger gcouger at NoXSPAM.mercury.rfdata.net
Tue Nov 21 02:51:33 EST 2000


I know it has been grown from the soil around Oklahoma State University.
They very carefully explained what it looked like and where we were likely
to find it. That was 30 years ago not they just tell them what it looks
like.

I suspect like all clostridium spores they are pretty common in area where
livestock have been.
--
Gordon    W5RED
G. C. Couger gcouger at provlue.net  Stillwater, OK



"Mike Syvanen" <syvanen at ucdavis.edu> wrote in message
news:3A198EAF.E947D197 at ucdavis.edu...
:
:
: exo1a at my-deja.com wrote:
:
: > In article <8udabc$65$1 at nnrp1.deja.com>,
: >   gerne at my-deja.com wrote:
: > > I think you may find good sources for anthrax in Kruger National
Park
: > > in Afrika. The highest genetic diversity is found there suggesting
it
: > > to be the place of origin.
: >
: > I have heard that it can be found in the soil in many places,
including
: > the U.S., but do not know how one would cultivate it from a soil
sample
: > (I doubt you can just dump a scoop of dirt into your nutrient medium
and
: > wait for it to grow since there will be lots of other stuff in there
that
: > will grow as well).  Or for that matter, what medium you would use.
:
: The growth medium has been published, but if you lack sufficient
: skills to find this is the primary literature, you probably lack the
skills
: to grow it anyway.
:
: To obtain the spore you can request it from the ATCC.  They will
: automatically forward your request to the FBI so you should be ready
: to deal with the ensuing red tape.
:
: Yes the spores are found in US soils.  The man arrested in Nevada
: for growing anthrax bacillus found his that way; apparently through
: an old newspaper story he located a burial site for an infected herd of
: cattle.
:
: Mike Syvanen
:
:







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