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Flower Minniesodi quietspirit57 at hotmail.com
Fri Mar 23 23:55:57 EST 2001


I am interested in finding scientific information related to the biology of 
mercury levels in lakes.

Inland lakes are void of visible life outside of weedlines, with a few 
exceptions...one being microorganisms. Knowing one way in which mercury 
enters the food chain is through these microorganisms, how much effect would 
there be if we introduced large amounts of decaying woody debris?

We live in an area where logging was done a hundred years or more ago. Left 
behind in the lakes where the logs were floated for eventual processing, are 
dead heads lying in relatively deep water and beginning to decay. It seems 
to me that by leaving these logs in the depths of the lakes, we are aiding 
the accerleration of mercury entering our food chain. If, in a normal void 
area of a lake there were x amount of microorganisms, wouldn't the addition 
of this wood would raise those levels to an unnatural state and be somewhat 
like pumping mercury into our food chain?
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