What Genomes have been Sequenced?

sbishop at desire.wright.edu sbishop at desire.wright.edu
Sat Oct 10 15:23:32 EST 1992


In article <1992Oct9.233031.18754 at scic.intel.com>, sbradley at scic.intel.com (Seth Bradley) writes:
> In article <robison1.718663846 at husc10> robison1 at husc10.harvard.edu (Keith Robison) writes:
>>sbradley at scic.intel.com (Seth Bradley) writes:
>>>Two human chromosomes have been sequenced.  The Y and the smallest of the
>>>remaining ones (can't remember its designation).
> 
>>Sigh.  If only it were true. Unfortunately, Y and 23q have only been
>>mapped into a complete set of cloned DNA fragments.
> 
> I reread the article, and you're correct about the sets of DNA fragments.
> However, it was Y and chromosome 21, not 23, if anyone cares :-).
> From the October 3 issue of Science Digest.
> 

As for me, I'm waiting for the gene research to cure asthma.

Cough, wheeze, gasp......


Sue


> -- 
> Seth J. Bradley, Senior System Administrator, Intel SCIC
> Internet: sbradley at scic.intel.com   UUCP: uunet!scic.intel.com!sbradley
> ----------------------------------------
> "A system admin's life is a sorry one.  The only advantage he has over
> Emergency Room doctors is that malpractice suits are rare.  On the other
> hand, ER doctors never have to deal with patients installing new versions
> of their own innards!"  -Michael O'Brien



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