Evolutions End?

Diane Stothard dstothar at magnus.acs.ohio-state.edu
Mon Oct 11 08:29:35 EST 1993


In article <MAILQUEUE-101.931011105143.568 at micro.uct.ac.za> ed at micro.uct.ac.za
writes:
>> > >Is it a possibility or a fact that all life will eventually
>evolve
>
>> Bacteria are the most evolved organisms because they've been evolving
>> for the longest time. ;-)
>>
>Really? Hasn't everything been evolving for the same length of time?
>B-|  And aren't bacteria actually the most primitive because they more
>closely resemble organisms present near the origin of life?  B-)
>
> Ed Rybicki, PhD
> (ed at micro.uct.ac.za)
> Dept Microbiology

Being a microbiologist, Ed, you don't really BELIEVE that bacteria are the most
primitive, do you? How could anything so "primitive" have evolved a myriad of 
biosynthethic pathways equipping it to live in virtually ANY environment, from 
frozen tundra to hot, sulfurous marine vents? I think primitive is a bad choice
of words. Compared to how man, a "highly evolved creature," has evolved to deal
with his environment, bacteria are at the pinnacle, wouldn't you say?

Diane



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