Evolution/Generation Time

vineland expatriate pmb2 at ellis.uchicago.edu
Thu Oct 14 07:48:14 EST 1993


In article <MAILQUEUE-101.931011143225.588 at micro.uct.ac.za> ed at micro.uct.ac.za writes:
>
>> Ed Rybicki is incorrect in assuming that bacteria are the most 
>primative
>> organisms and everything evolves at the same rate.
>Note: B-)
>
>Of course bacteria are "more evolved" in that they have undergone 
>more generations than us, or whales - and the concept of "primitive" 
>or "advanced" is mainly in the head of the observer.  BUT I never 
>stated everything evolves at the same rate, because it patently 
>obviously does not: longer generation times and shielding from UV 
>and other mutagenic radiation means deepsea organisms probably 
>evolve slower than obligate terrestrial thermophiles, for example.  

Isn't one of the puzzles of neutral mutation rates the fact that, despite 
differences in generation time within groups of taxa, the rates of neutral 
or nearly neutral substitution seem to scale more as a function of absolute
time than generation time (generation number)?  That was something people 
still found puzzling last time I looked at it.... (ie, within a larger group,
eg chordates, arthropods, etc.)

-Peter
pmb2 at ellis.uchicago.edu



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