Milk Gene/Soy phytoestrogens

Dr Jim Cummins cummins at POSSUM.MURDOCH.EDU.AU
Wed Dec 21 23:02:02 EST 1994


>In article <Pine.3.05.9412200728.A21868-c100000 at mcz>, dmw at MCZ.HARVARD.EDU
>(Daniel Weinreich) wrote:
>
>> I would only add that the "polarity" of the change may be the reverse of
>> that suggested in the excerpt (as implied by the original post, in which
>> lactose tolerance in adults was described as "a genetic defect").  It
>> seems plausable that the "ancestral state" in humans was lactose
>> intolerance, since dairy farming is a relatively recent innovation.  Can
>> adult chimps digest milk?  I bet they can't. 

smh1008 at cus.cam.ac.uk (David Huen) wrote in response
>> 
>And as a lactose-intolerant Oriental, I wonder why lactose is so uniquely a
>component of milk? Is there a milk (excluding soy of course :-) that
>doesn't have lactose as its carbohydrate? It would seem strange that in the
>process of developing lactation, one actually also developed the synthesis
>of a sugar not used elsewhere. Is lactose synthesised for any other purpose
>in vivo?

One downside of soy products is that they are relatively high in
phytoestrogens and hence potentially implicated in male infertility.  On
the other side of the coin, the relatively low incidence of prostate cancer
in Japanese males is attributed to the anti-androgenic effects of soy
products.   Guess you can't win them all ;-)

Yours, virtually:-

Jim "Spermatology rules o~ o~ o~ o~" Cummins

Associate Professor in Veterinary Anatomy
Murdoch University,
Murdoch Western Australia 6150
Tel +61-9-360 2668
Fax +61-9-310 4144
E mail cummins at possum.murdoch.edu.au

"Ignorance is a renewable resource"  PJ O'Rourke.







More information about the Mol-evol mailing list