Proteins - Higher Functions

Warren Gallin wgallin at gpu.srv.ualberta.ca
Thu Jun 23 19:02:44 EST 1994


In Article <73787.ewright at fox.nstn.ns.ca>, ewright at FOX.NSTN.CA ("Edwin
Wright") wrote:
>Notwithstanding that we generally discriminate between lower and higher
>forms of life with repect to the overall organism (e.g. we consider
>vertebrates higher than invertebrates), presumably, this cannot be done
>for all known proteins within such organisms for the simple reason that
>in some cases, a specific protein in a lower form of life may function at
>a higher level than the corresponding protein in a higher form of life.
>
>Does anyone know of any comprehensive data pertaining to comparative
>protein function between organisms with repect to establishing a sort of
>"functional scale"?
>

You may discriminate on the basis of "higher and lower" forms of life, but
those terms have no practical meaning in biology, other than maybe
indicating in a very general sense greater or lesser degrees of structural
organization.  As such, the question that you are posing for proteins seems
meaningless to me.  Could you define more clearly what you mean by higher
level protein function and functional scale?  Perhaps some examples of what
you consider to be differences on this scale would help.
Warren Gallin,
Department of Zoology, University of Alberta
wgallin at gpu.srv.ualberta.ca



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