Evolutionary tree of *all* proteins

LING ANDY 90lingan at wave.scar.utoronto.ca
Thu Oct 13 14:48:55 EST 1994


Laurent Duret (duret at evoserv.univ-lyon1.fr) wrote:


: For example, a protein gene may have evolved by fusion of two genes, exchange of exon,
: etc.  This mode of evolution is frequently observed, particularly among higher eukaryotes (probably because of the interuption of genes by introns). For a recent 
: review, see Patthy 1994, Curr. Opin. Struct. Biol. 4:383-392.

: Suppose that protein AB arose by fusion of protein A and protein B, that protein
: AC arose by fusion of protein A and protein C and that protein BC arose by fusion of 
: protein B and protein C.

: AB, AC and BC share homology. However, these homology relationships can not be
: represented by a tree.

I'm a bit confused, do you mean the DNA sequences or do you mean the actual
protein itself?  If you mean the actual protein then I agree that tracing
the ancestry of each of the components forming the holoprotein would be
incredibly complicated.  


Andy.
--
: 90lingan at wave.scar.utoronto.ca :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
: "I guess I'll have to tell Skinner that the suspect *is* a giant worm.":
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: --Muldur from "The X-Files" :::



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