DNA storage

Andrew Shedlock shedlock at fish.washington.edu
Mon Dec 4 15:28:17 EST 1995


On 1 Dec 1995, Anna Bass wrote:

> Does anyone know of any information or have past experience with the best
> methods for long-term storage of DNA?    This would be DNA that has already
> been isolated using standard phenol/chloroform methods.  We are looking for
> methods that would allow effective amplification or microsatellite analysis
> (ie primer development) over long-terms (ie years).
> Thanks in advance for any help
> 
> 
Hi Anna,

Unless you are talking multi-decade time scales here, I believe that
simply keeping aliquots of your purified genomic exctract at -80 degrees
in autoclaved 1X TE (10 mM Tris-HCl [pH 8], 1 mM EDTA) should do fine --
especially if you don't pull it in and out of storage such that it must
endure the stress of freeze/thaw.  ANY DNAse activity from contaminating
bacteria in your aliquot can be disasterous for high molecular weight
samples even during frozen storage. I suspect that storage of completely
dried pellets at -80 would also be very stable, which is consistent with
the physics of ETOH archival storage strategies and cases where dried
skins and so on yield workable high molecular weight "ancient" DNA
samples. 

G'luck -- A. M. Shedlock

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Andrew M. Shedlock                 ..T.G...A...C... Molecular Biology .
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