Anyone Seen Evolution?

John R. Jungck jungck at BELOIT.EDU
Thu Dec 5 15:44:18 EST 1996


Dear unnamed participant,

I have to say that this discussion seems enormously misplaced, but look at
plants: allopolyploidy in the Brassica family is an excellent example.

John

 >In article <m0vVd68-0004ZcC at uctmail2.uct.ac.za>, ed at MOLBIOL.UCT.AC.ZA says...
>>
>>> To:            mol-evol at net.bio.net
>>> From:          un691cs at genius.embnet.dkfz-heidelberg.de (slavemaster)
>>> Subject:       Re: Anyone Seen Evolution?
>>
>>> Problem is the definition of what a species is ! as I recall correctly from
>>> biology 107: aspecies is defined as an organism that can produce fertile
>>> offspring if mated with an organism of the same species.
>>> With E.coli (a-sexual multiplication) or a virus, the definition of a
>>>species is almost
>>> impossible,
>>
>>...but has been done: taxonomy committees for both groups of
>>organisms have defined species for both, so the mating concept falls
>>away.
>
>Hm interesting. I'm not familiar with this: how
>is a species defined nowadays ?
>(aslo: I remember a dixussion once on the telly
>between creationists and normal people and in the end
>the creationist had to admit that new species are being
>formed. But they THEN went ahead and stated that this is still
>no proof for evolution, because its unimaginable that
>a complete new genus or even taxa are being formed !
>
>But anyway: do you have examples of higher organsims
>where evolution is more or less obvious ?
>
>clemens

John R. Jungck
Biology
Beloit College
700 College Street
Beloit, WI 53511

Web site for the BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium:
        http://www.beloit.edu/~bquest





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