amplifiable DNA from museum fish specimens; methods?

Andrew M. Shedlock shedlock at NATURE.BERKELEY.EDU
Wed Jul 17 18:02:27 EST 1996


Dear Bruce and others to whom it may concern,

I have a paper in review for BioTechniques right now on this exact issue
for which I'm expecting to receive a verdict any day.  Along with
colleagues at the Scripps Institution and the University of Washington, I
developed a modified extraction/PCR protocol that worked on a variety of
deep-sea fish specimens, some of which had been formalin-fixed almost a
century ago. It's far from the first attempt to get DNA data from museum
specimens, but, in my humble opinion, it's a valuable starting point and
has plenty of room for optimization with other formalin-fixed,
fluid-preserved material. 

I'd be willing to share elements of the recipe with you or anyone who is
interested and willing to acknowledge the (as of today) yet unpublished
work in any manuscripts submitted prior to it's acceptance for
BioTechniques. 

All the best --Andy
..................................................................... 
                                 .T...G...A...C......................
Andrew M. Shedlock               ..T.G...A...C... Molecular Ecology..
Univ. of California at Berkeley  ...T...A...C...... & Systematics ...
Dept. E.S.P.M.                   ....T.A...C.........................
201 Wellman Hall                 .....T...C... Office: (510) 642-3989
Berkeley, CA  94720              ......T.C.... Lab:    (510) 642-7410
shedlock at nature.berkeley.edu     .......T..... Fax:    (510) 642-0477
........................................T............................



---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Wed, 17 Jul 1996 16:02:27 -0400
From: "Bruce  J. Turner" <fishgen at vt.edu>
To: molecular-evolution at net.bio.net
Cc: systbiol at sonofsun.sdsu.edu
Subject: amplifiable DNA from museum fish specimens; methods?

 Does anyone out there have, or know of, a reliable published protocol for
obtaining amplifiable DNA from fish specimens in museum collections---these
are routinely fixed in "formalin" and subsequently stored in ethanol or
isopropanol.  I need such a protocol to help confirm the genetic identity
of a fish population previously thought to be extinct, but which has
reappeared at its only known locality (there is a serious possibility here
of introductions by humans from nearby, non-endangered populations).  I
haven't found anything, but surely some one has tackled this by now?  Any
help would be appreciated, and sorry for any duplicate mailings...

                        Bruce J. Turner
                        Assoc. Professor of Biology
                        VPISU
                        Blacksburg, VA 24061
                        (540)-231-7444 (V)
                        (540)-231-9307 (F)
                        fishgen at vt.edu







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