Symposium Announcement

AGERBER at CCIT.ARIZONA.EDU AGERBER at CCIT.ARIZONA.EDU
Wed May 1 13:44:11 EST 1996


The Phylogeny of Life and  
The Accomplishments of Phylogenetic Biology

A symposium at the University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA

October 11-13, 1996

Sponsored and Organized by The Research Training Group in 
The Analysis of Biological Diversification

Overview:  The phylogeny of life represents the genealogical relationships 
among species and the broad-scale flow of genetic information through 
evolutionary time.  Phylogenetic biology focuses on reconstructing the 
phylogenetic tree of life and on using it as the framework for interpretation 
of evolutionary change.  The phylogenetic approach to comparative 
studies has proven itself to be indispensible for unraveling and 
comprehending life's diversification.  
	The RTG-sponsored symposium will be a celebration of The 
Phylogeny of Life and Accomplishments of Phylogenetic Biology.  
Twenty four invited participants, with collective expertise covering an 
immense breadth of biological diversity and evolutionary biology, will 
deliver platform talks over the course of five half-day sessions.  The 
speakers will address new and long-standing general questions from many 
realms of biology that have benefited from or contributed to a better 
understanding of phylogeny.  
	The symposium will also include a large contributed poster session 
and an evening workshop on the Tree of Life Internet project being 
organized by David R. and Wayne P. Maddison.
	As a common theme for discussion throughout the event all 
participants will consider the future main lines of inquiry and research in 
phylogenetic biology.  The symposium will conclude with an open 
discussion of these issues.

Participants and Topics

SUSAN BARNS, Indiana Univ., Los Alamos Natl. Lab,  TBA
RICHARD BRUSCA, Univ. Charleston,  The challenge of understanding 
arthropod biodiversification
SIMON CONWAY MORRIS, Cambridge Univ.,  Early Metazoan 
radiations: what the fossil record can and cannot tell us
MICHAEL DONOGHUE, Harvard Univ.,  Advances and controversies 
in vascular plant phylogeny
SCOTT EDWARDS, Univ. Washington,  Higher level molecular 
systematics of birds: protein evolution and beyond
DOUGLAS ERWIN, Smithsonian Institution,  The fine structure of 
extinction: phylogeny and mass extinction/recovery episodes
RICHARD HALLICK, Univ. Arizona,  Massive intron invasion during 
evolution of chloroplast genes of Euglenoid protists
DAVID HILLIS, Univ. Texas,  Tests of phylogenetic hypotheses: 
Examples from vertebrates
ELIZABETH KELLOGG, Harvard Univ.,  The Grass Menagerie: the 
genetics of phylogenetics
ANDREW KNOLL, Harvard Univ.,  The Early Diversification of Life
LAURA LANDWEBER, Princeton Univ.,  Evolution of Complexity in 
Genetic Systems
DAVID MADDISON, Univ. Arizona,  Tree of Life Workshop
WAYNE MADDISON, Univ. Arizona  TBA
LUCINDA MCDADE, Univ. Arizona  TBA
NANCY MORAN, Univ. Arizona, Diversification in bacterial 
endosymbionts of insects
LISA NAGY, Univ. Arizona, Changes in arthropod morphology and the 
evolution of gene regulatory networks
STUART NICHOL, Centers for Disease Control,  Changing landscapes 
and emerging RNA viruse
MICHAEL NOVACEK, American Museum of Natural History,  The 
burgeoning database on the higher level phylogeny of mammals
RODERICK PAGE, Univ. Glasgow,  Genes, organisms, and areas: 
phylogeny and the study of historical associations
NICHOLAS STRAUSFELD, Univ. Arizona  TBA
ALAN TEMPLETON, Washington Univ.,  The evolution of 
anatomically modern humans:  what do gene trees really tell us?
RYTAS VILGALYS, Duke Univ., Mycogeography: using phylogenies to 
study the biogeography of wild mushrooms
ELIZABETH WATERS, Univ. Arizona  TBA


The registration fee includes entrance to all sessions;  the Thursday night 
mixer;  Friday night workshop and a printed copy of the abstracts from the 
symposium, but does not include the cost of the Saturday evening 
Banquet.  The deadline for submission of all registration materials is 
AUGUST 2, 1996.  The number of attendees is limited so please register 
as soon as possible.  

	Faculty and other Professionals			$100.00
	Graduate students and Postdoctoral scientists	  $50.00
	Saturday evening Banquet			  $15.00

Make checks payable to The University of Arizona Foundation/RTG.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO ATTEND AND/OR PRESENT A POSTER:  
You can register by mailing your check to the address below.  Registration 
will be confirmed by mail and additional information about poster 
abstracts, accommodations and travel to Tucson will be sent at that time.

You can also request this information by emailing us at:  
RTG at ccit.arizona.edu.  Be sure to send us:
Your name:
Institution:
Mailing Address:

Please mail your registration and address any questions to:  
Marty Wojciechowski or Anne Gerber
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Arizona
Tucson, Arizona USA  85721
FAX 520P621P9190; email: rtg at ccit.arizona.edu
Updates posted to RTG Web site: http://biodiv.arizona.edu/rtg.html.




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