how fast are genes?

higgins at ebi.ac.uk higgins at ebi.ac.uk
Tue Mar 18 06:46:07 EST 1997


In article <5gjupd$rd2 at mserv1.dl.ac.uk>, Johnjoe McFadden <j.mcfadden at surrey.ac.uk> writes:
> Does anybody know how fast genetic information may be transcribed and then
> translated, in prokaryotes and eukaryotes?
> 
> A related question is how much time needs to elapse from a mutation to a
> phenotype?
> 
> I guess this will depend on the type of mutation - most would require a DNA
> replication step - how fast is that?
> 

Howya Johnjoe:

Translation is about 20aa/sec in both Eukaryotess and Prokaryotes.

Replication happens at about 500-1000nt/sec in E.coli and 10 times
slower in Eukaryotes but the latter tend to have many origins of 
replication per chromosome as against one in most bacteria.

Transcription in bacteria happens at about 50nt/sec. but I expect
the rate is comparable in big hairy creatures.


(I think :-) , PLEASE correct me if anyone has more accurate figures)


Des Higgins
Biochemistry Dept.
UCC
Cork, Ireland.


> Thanks
> 
> Johnjoe
> 
> Johnjoe McFadden, PhD
> Molecular Microbiology Group
> School of Biological Sceinces
> University of Surrey,
> Guildford, Surrey GU2 5XH, UK.
> 
> tel: 44-(0)1483 300800 extn.2671
> fax: 44-(0)1483 300374
> 
> e-mail: j.mcfadden at surrey.ac.uk
> 



More information about the Mol-evol mailing list