Plant pathology (molecular biology) research position wanted

Dr Richard Johnson R.D.Johnson at massey.ac.nz
Tue May 3 16:13:07 EST 1994


I am looking for a plant pathology research position, preferably in New
Zealand but will consider anywhere at this point. I have molecular
biology experience as well  as traditional plant pathology training. My
resume follows.

Richard Johnson.

CURRICULUM VITAE


Full Name:					Dr Richard David Johnson

Nationality:					British

Date of Birth:				2nd August 1964

Years as a practising Researcher:	3 years


Academic Qualifications:

BTec Higher National Diploma	Applied Biology (merit)	Nottingham
Polytechnic, UK	1985
BSc (Hons)	Plant Biology (Class 2i)	Uni. of East Anglia, Norwich, UK	1987
PhD	Plant Pathology	Uni. of East Anglia, Norwich, UK 	1991


Honours/distinctions/membership of societies, institutions, committees:

!	Member of The British Society of Plant Pathology (BSPP)


Present Position:	

Postdoctoral fellow, Department of Microbiology and Genetics, Massey
University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.


Present research/professional speciality:	

These include the study of plant pathology and its importance in
agriculture, and the use of plant manipulation for the production of
improved crops and varieties.  In addition to these I have a background
in the application of molecular biology to fungal systems and the
potential for genetic modification in such systems.

My present research focuses on the study of fungal endophytes in
ryegrass, with particular emphasis on Acremonium species implicated in
the nervous disorder 'Ryegrass Staggers Syndrome', found in sheep cattle
and deer. Specifically our group is interested in cloning the fungal
gene(s) responsible for the production of paxilline and lolitrem which
are responsible for the above mentioned disorder.


Number of Refereed Publications:	4	


Major Achievements, including important publications:

Submitted a research report on the bacteriology of clinical and food
samples, whilst working for 6 months as a medical laboratory scientific
officer for the Public Health Laboratory Service (1985).

Submitted a final year project report on the use of single cultured
shoots for adventitious regeneration in Pisum and its possible use in
plant transformation using Agrobacterium (1987).

Completed PhD thesis entitled Genetic Variation of Leptosphaeria maculans
(1991).

1.	Hussey G., Johnson R.D. and Waren S. (1989).  Transformation of
meristematic cells in the shoot apex of cultured pea shoots by
Agrobacterium tumefaciens and A. rhizogenes.  Protoplasma 148 101-105.
2.	Johnson R.D. and Lewis B.G. (1990).  DNA polymorphism in Leptosphaeria
maculans.  Physiological and Molecular Plant Pathology 37 417-424.
3.	Johnson R.D. and Lewis B.G. (1994).  Host range, systemic infection
and epidemiology of Leptosphaeria maculans.  Plant Pathology, in press.
4.	Itoh Y., Johnson R.D. and Scott D.B. (1994) Integrative Transformation
of the Mycotoxin producing fungus, Penicillium paxilli . Current
genetics, in press.
5.	Johnson R.D.,  Christensen M.J. & Scott D.B. (1994)  Characterisation
of spontaneous morphological variants of Acremonium endophytes
(Manuscript submitted).


Outside Interests:

These include back country tramping, especially in New Zealand where I
have travelled extensively, foreign travel in which I have visited most
continents, beer brewing, reading and listening to a wide range of music.


Other Qualifications:

I hold a full U.K. and New Zealand driving licence.

I am competent at using computers and have experience with word
processing,  drawing packages, Internet facilities and GCG analysis.

I have some experience at teaching and supervising undergraduate and
postgraduate students at the research level and helped to run the Plant
Pathology practical course at the University of East Anglia, whilst there.


Referees:

1)	Professor Barry Scott,
	Molecular Genetics Unit,
	Massey University,
	Palmerston North,
	New Zealand.

2)	Dr. Brian Lewis,
	School of Biological Sciences,
	University of East Anglia,
	Norwich, NR4 7TJ,
	U.K.

3)	Dr. Alan Coddington,
	School of Biological Sciences,
	University of East Anglia,
	Norwich, NR4 7TJ,
	U.K.



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