indoor air quality

jlacey john.lacey at bbsrc.ac.uk
Tue Nov 29 07:37:46 EST 1994


In article <jmicales.266.2ECBA80B at facstaff.wisc.edu>, jmicales at facstaff.wisc.edu (Jessie Micales) says:
>
>Greetings everyone!  I haven't followed this particular newsgroup much, but 
>I'm going to start.  My apologies if I am replowing old ground.
>
>Does anyone have any information (reprints, the names of current 
>researchers, etc.) on the influence of mold spores on indoor air quality?  I 
>attended a symposium in Prague last summer where they were saying that a 
>complex of dust mites, mold spores, and toxic chemicals (released from 
>furniture, paneling, etc.) contributes to the "sick building" phenomenon.  I 
>often get phone calls regarding mold in houses, and now I think I would like 
>to pursue this as a research topic.  Any ideas?  Regards....
>
>Jessie A. Micales
>jmicales at facstaff.wisc.edu
>U.S. Forest Products Laboratory
>Durendal Fencing Club

You might find the following books helpful as a start to finding your way 
around indoor air microorganisms in relation to health:

Singh, J. (Ed.) 1994.  Building Mycology: Management of Decay and Health 
in Buildings. London, E & FN Spon.

Rylander, R. and Jacobs, R.R. (Eds.). 1994.  Organic Dusts: Exposure, 
Effects and Prevention.  Boca Raton, FL, Lewis Publishers.

I can provide other references to airborne microorganisms and occupational
health if required.

John Lacey
john.lacey at bbsrc.ac.uk



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