microsatellites in filamentous fungi?

Douglas Rhoads DRHOADS at MERCURY.UARK.EDU
Fri Oct 13 08:02:22 EST 1995


> To:            mycology at net.bio.net
> From:          oser at uni-muenster.de
> Subject:       microsatellites in filamentous fungi?
> Date:          Thu, 12 Oct 1995 12:01:59 GMT

> Does anyone know something about microsatellites (or simple sequences) in 
> filamentous fungi? I have found a repetetive sequence in our fungus 
> (Claviceps, ascomycete) with homology to a human microsatellite sequence. As 
> this sequence seems to occur in multiple copies in our fungus and consists of 
> a short, repeated nucleotide motif,, I tend to believe it to be a fungal 
> microsatellite. But, in the literature (I went back one year in the CC Life 
> Science issues) and databanks (EMBL and Genbank) I found only animal, plant 
> and yeast examples.
> 
> 

Do you not mean similarity to a human microsattelite?  Since it is 
unlikely that your SSR and that from human are related by descent.

We have been analyzing repeated sequences in several species of 
Colletotrichum.  Some species have few if any medium sized (>50 bp) 
repeats.  A few have numerous, however these repeats all seem to be 
of the SSR variety and not of the transposable element variety.  Why 
some species have produced SSRs while others seem to avoid is 
enigmatic to me.  Then again, I am not sure there is anything more 
than a realization that they exist and have certain repurcussions in 
human disease.  Some may now function as artificial promoters but 
those may be more of the minisattelite size.

When we do a blast search of Genbank we can't (or don't know how to) 
limit to fungal entries but my guess is that Genbank searches don't 
find any fungal SSR sequences because we just don't have enough 
information from enough ascomycetes.  Maybe Aspergillus and 
Neurospora are more of the variety that don't have or don't tolerate 
SSRs.  (Just guessing and would be open to some further discussion or 
flaming).

//========================================================\\
||Doug Rhoads              || Dept. of Biological Sciences||
||drhoads at mercury.uark.edu || 601 Science Engineering     ||
||drhoads at uafsysb.uark.edu || University of Arkansas      ||
||501-575-3251             || Fayetteville, AR 72701      ||
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