How to get a Clean Spore-Print?

Thomas Ziegler Biologische.Pilze at t-online.de
Fri Aug 29 16:26:32 EST 1997


Dear Mycology-Netters!

As a real Novice concerning starting cultivation of shrooms from Spores lately 
tried propagation of our own grown oyster-spores, as a first step (began 
with oysters because I thought oyster to be the simplest to try as they are well 
known to be comparably quick growing...) that I got from  a rather fresh 
specimen  from a 'comparably-clean' spawn-run-room where for incidence a 
fructification occured: 

*Cut off a piece of the cap-underside using scissors and tweezers and attached 
them using some grease under the top of a clean agar plate and kept them off any 
medium for half an hour...(hoped to get most contaminants fallen off already)

*Then put them on a clean MYPA-medium and twisted the top every 1.5 hours a bit 
so that after one day the whole dish was really loaded with spore-prints        
        
                 => Was Optically-Real-Good-Lookin!                     :-)

But bad result: Only bacterial infections, and virtually NOT a single spot (on 
10 parallel dishes!!) where I had the impression it could be worth propagation 
of the growing visual mycelium to another dish for clean-up steps...    8-(

            Who has Experience and likes to share them with us?

  Is it generally possible in Routinous Work without any Antibiotics? -> How??

We are a small Organic Mushroom Farm and would like to avoid any Chemical Agens 
if possible (although I obtained a small set of Antibiotics...) because I fear 
it is sometimes in routine-work unevitable to use it...

Out of this very first trial and error would think it could be (from the 
Organic-Point-of-View) the Absolute Clean Solution to come through to get a 
confirmed pure-culture (mycelial-growth) first, propagate it sterily and get a 
fruiting in an as clean as possible environment (say within a sterilised 
Erlenmayer-flask) and use the so-grown-specimen to get a real clean spore-sprint 
from.

    But this meant by far the most Time-Consuming-Way-to-Grow!?,    Thomas

Thomas Ziegler, Biologische.Pilze at t-online.de, D-97892 Unterwittbach, Germany



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