Shitake Cultivation

Mike Carey mikeca at concentric.net
Fri Oct 31 20:29:06 EST 1997


Mike Carey wrote:
> 
> Jerry wrote:
> >
> > On Thu, 23 Oct 1997 16:58:54 -0700, Mike Carey <mikeca at concentric.net>
> > wrote:
> >
> > >>The Shitake is grown on a alderwood/rye
> > >>flour substrate and was removed from the jars when placed into the
> > >>humidity chamber.
> >
> > >I understand that Shiitake needs Oak bark or some (unknown?) compound
> > >found in Oak bark to fruit, though it can be grown on some other types
> > >of wood but not as well. Perhaps Alderwood is not one of them, or
> > >perhaps some Oak bark added to the mix will do the trick.
> >
> > Actually, some commercial growers prefer alder sawdust.  Once the
> > sawdust is matched to an appropriate strain of shiitake, it does very
> > well.  There may be something to the bark idea, but apparently alder
> > bark does the job.  If this is an issue, most sawdust (from mills)
> > appears to have enough bark in it.
> >
> > -Jerry-
> > --
> > Jerry Haugen
> > The Mushroom Growers' Newsletter
> > P.O. Box 5065
> > Klamath Falls, OR 97601
> > USA
> > MycoWrld at cdsnet.net
> > http://www.cdsnet.net/Business/mushroom/
> Today my two blocks have started to develope brown patches. Isn't this
> the precursor to the actual pinning?
My two 1/2 pint sized blocks of Shiitaki mycelium are both begining to
pin. The amount of time from innoculation to pinning was about 5-6
weeks. This experiment verifies the Shiitaki as a mushroom species that
can be grown in the home using basic jar technic. This eliminates the
need for filtered spawn bags and allows the use of reuseable jars.
Thanks to everyone for their responces to my earlier postings. Mike
Carey



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