Biggest, Smallest?

truffler1635 at my-deja.com truffler1635 at my-deja.com
Sun Apr 16 06:18:59 EST 2000


In article <B15K4.1030$FR5.39580 at news.uswest.net>,
  "Rex Swartzendruber" <rexs13 at hotmail.takethispartout.com> wrote:
> <truffler1635 at my-deja.com> wrote in message
> news:8d7ll1$qsf$1 at nnrp1.deja.com...
> -snip-
> > Forgive my saying so, but that seems more than just a little strange.
> > Bondarzewia montana (=mesenterica) is a fairly common fungus that I
> > associate with root rot. To call it an important fungi in the ROD seems
> > a little odd, as I would associate it with poor forest health.
>
> The fungi placed in the ROD were not placed there because of any certain
> "importance" in the ecosystem (the decomposers are important, too:-{). These
> are fungi that had been reported from areas associated the spotted owl that
> had been reported but only rarely. They were on a list drawn up by a group
> which I believe consisted of Dr. Trappe,  Dr. Denison, and I believe Dr.
> O'Dell and Dr. Castellano. Dr. Castellano spoke about it at the March NATS
> meeting.
>
I recognize that many wood-rotting fungi are equally important in the
ROD as well as those which cause occasion tree fatalities. But abundant
B. mesenterica I still associate with extremely late-stage forest
stands.
> To place Cantharellus formosus on the Survey and Manage list seems rather
> odd to me as well. More research since the time that the list was made has
> proven that Cantharellus formorsus is the most common Chaterelle in the
> Pacific Northwest.
>
> > > I have found numerous Tricholoma magnivelare buttons, Cantharellus
> formosus,
> > > Hydnum repandum  and Russula brevipes parasitized by Hypomyces
> lactifluorum
> > > specimens each weighing over 1 pound.
> > >
> > They are fairly common on the coast. It's not unusual to find clusters
> > of these large fungi, expecially when hiding under Sword fern.
>
> That didn't come across too clearly. The only fungi that was parasitized by
> the H. lactifluorum was the R. brevipes.
Kind of figured that, Rex. ;))
>
> >  During the past
> > > three fall seasons this site has also produced: Tricholoma magnivelare,
> > > Tricholoma flavovirens,
> > > Boletus edulis, Boletus pulcherrimus, Gomphus clavatus, Gomphus
> floccosus,
> > > Gomphus spp.?,
> > > Cantharellus formosus, Cantharellus infundibuliformis, Cantharellus
> > > subalbidus, Russula brevipes, Russula xerampelina, Hydnum repandum,
> > > Pseudohydnum gelatinosum, Cortinarius spp. (purple). I'm sure that I
> > > overlooked other fungi as I was searching for edible species.
> > >
> > I know that some people consider many of the Gomphus edible. But I'd be
> > careful about sharing them with others, Rex. And I'd be _very_ carefuly
> > with any Cortinarius species.
>
> I don't eat or sell Gomphus spp. or Cortinarius spp. They were noticeable as
> I searched for the edible fungi.
>
> > > The largest truffle that I have found was a Tuber gibbosum var.
> autumnale
> > > (1996). It weighed 1.25 pounds.
> > Did you happen to get a photo of this? The largest that Dr. Trappe has
> > reported was just over 8 ounces, located near Sweet Home, OR. While
> > several specimens over 5 ounces were located, nothing over 8.5 ounces
> > has been reported before to my knowledge.
>
> I will keep that in mind in the future. I have found many specimens over 5
> ounces, several dozen over 8 ounces and several over 12 ounces.
>
> >  The largest Leucangium carthusiana that I
> > > have found tipped the scale at 1.12 pounds (1996).
> > I hope you got photos of that one to, Rex. Truly a monster if it can be
> > verified.
>
> One of my foray partners found one a bit larger but I broke it with the
> stick shift of my car backing out of a store parking lot. The problem with
> maintaining secrecy is that the person keeping the secrets is left out of
> the flow of conversation. I have only recently joined NATS. I had collected
> a species novum Leucangium for two years before a NATS member located one on
> the same property and recognized it as being unique. This particular species
> stains red where nicked or the gleba is exposed. I thought that it was
> contaminated by some other fungi.
>
> Rex Swartzendruber
> www.trufflezone.com
>
Sounds like we know the same ex-NATS president. Or did Welles go out
with you? I seem to remember that Zelda Carter's sp. nov. Leucangium,
which she fed to NATS members one December potluck, was a species novum
which may have had reddish stains at or near the peridium. Also, I
recall Welles saying he has found a red-staining Leucangium on several
occasions. See what collections tell us? BTW, you need not specify
_where_ the truffles were found, Rex. The nearest town, or even county
designation is enough to submit with a collection. Especially when you
with to keep these locations secret from other rapid harvesters. Like
those we both know, eh?

Daniel B. Wheeler
www.oregonwhitetruffles.com


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