Pecan Truffles

truffler1635 at my-deja.com truffler1635 at my-deja.com
Thu Dec 7 02:39:19 EST 2000


In article <009101c05fa8$482e1d20$e319fea9 at jeff>,
  "Jeffrey Kramer" <velosachef at earthlink.net> wrote:
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> Hello, my name is Jeffrey Kramer.  I was referred by Nathan Wilson of =
> Los Angeles.  I am a Chef in Los Angeles as well as being very =
> interested in Mycology.  Nathan forwarded your email message to me =
> concerning the Pecan Truffles. =20
>
> I am very interested in cooking with them to see how they would taste =
> for a culinary view.  Do you still need chefs to experiment with your =
> Truffles?
I don't know, Jeffrey. The truffles were found this year and forwarded to
me for examination. I gave a pound to Chef Greg Higgins of Higgins
Restaurant, who does wonderful things with truffles. He used them that
evening in butter on top of slightly mashed potatoes as a side dish. All
of this clients loved them. Not a single person complained about the
dish, indicating they were better received than many truffles are. (Anna
Marin, past truffle-master of the North American Truffling Society has
estimated somewhere between 5 and 10 percent of the population doesn't
like truffles.)

The truffles actually came from Georgia nearly two months ago. And I
believe the season for them is nearly over. Fresh T. texense (Pecan
truffles) have a milky aroma, with elements of morels and malt. I tried
them on potato salad, and was quite taken with them. In addition, some of
the truffles are relatively large, which makes it much easier to clean
them than some of our Pacific Northwest truffles: something I, for one,
enjoy a lot.

Daniel B. Wheeler
www.oregonwhitetruffles.com


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