Lawn & Garden mushrooms

Daniel B. Wheeler dwheeler at teleport.com
Thu Jul 26 02:50:31 EST 2001


Interesting project. You know Nancy Smith Weber has been working on a
similar project, and has already totaled several hundred varieties.

I'm not sure why you decided not to include mycorrhizal species:
certainly they were be common where appropriate host trees are at, but
that would also indicate they can be readily dispersed through either
wind-blown spores or already inoculated on roots. I would anticipate
considerable interest there as well. Certainly I would vote for it.

I have the following in my immediate neighborhood. I have photos
(jpegs) of some of them.

Almost any Coprinus sps: comatus, atramentarius, disseminatus, lagopus
(fruiting now!), radiatus, picaceus, etc. (Several fruiting in the
compost I got earlier this year)
Morchella angusticeps
M. crassipes
M. esculenta (or very similar species)
M. elata
Bovista pila (wonder where that one came from)
Calvatia pyriforme
Lepista rachodes (pretty easy compost pile fungus here, provided it's
got more wood than leafy green material)
Paxillus involutus (with a birch a squirrel planted, but was not
present until I "planted" it.)
Scleroderma cepa, S. laeve, S. areolatum, S. sp. nov. (this last one
was interested, as it was growing on rotted treated wood, supposedly
fungal resistant; also because Scleroderma are generally considered
mycorrhizal)
Marasmius oreades
Marasmiella sps.
Aleuria aurantia
Lentinulla edodes (hey, a guy's gotta eat!)
Bisporella citrina
Thelophora terrestris
Clavulina cristata
Tulostoma simulans (actually in my neighbor's yard, but pretty close)
Psathyrella candolleana
Paneolus subalteatus (on the local medical center's lawn. It begs the
question: was it accidentally inoculated by someone going for
treatment?)
Agaricus perrarus
Hypholoma fasciculare
Conocybe tenera (or something quite similar)
Heboloma crustuliniforme
Resupinatus applicatus
Pleurotus ostreatus
Pleurotus columbiana
Laccaria laccata
Lepista nuda
Xeromphalina campanella
Strobilurus occidentalis

Daniel B. Wheeler
www.oregonwhitetruffles.com




More information about the Mycology mailing list