What are the six different types of human neurons?

John Edstrom edstrom at hsc.ucalgary.ca
Thu Apr 9 09:53:02 EST 1992


In article <1992Apr8.235705.26412 at organpipe.uug.arizona.edu> bill at NSMA.AriZonA.EdU (Bill Skaggs) writes:
>In article <1992Apr8.151118.4780 at watmath.waterloo.edu> 
>mwtilden at watmath.waterloo.edu (Mark W. Tilden) writes:
>>
>>During a recent neural-networks lecture, it was pointed out that
>>comp-sci types only model one type of human neuron, where animal (human)
>>bodys contain no less than six different types.
>>

I'd be interested in hearing more about this.  What criteria were used
to define these classes?  What was the context of the talk?

>>I know I could look this up, but what is a net for?  Could someone
>>please post the names of these six, and, if possible, a short discription
>>of their physiological locations and function (so far as is known).
>>
>  I doubt that you could look this up, because it's nonsense.
>Animal bodies contain literally hundreds of different types of
>neuron.  Even if you only distinguish on the basis of the
>chemical neurotransmitter used, there are still at least several
>dozen different types.  The functional consequences of these
>differences have hardly begun to be explored by neural network
>theorists.
>
>	-- Bill

Amen!  If there only were six types we'd probably know everything by
now. :-)

 Except for specail restricted purposes (retina physiolgy, cerebellum
physiology, etc.) the notion of a few types of neurons or standard
circuitry has no credibility among neuroscientists.


John Edstrom | edstrom @ elmer.hsc.ucalgary.ca

--
 RM 2104, HSc Building,  Div. Neuroscience
 U. Calgary School of Medicine,  3330 Hospital Drive NW
 Calgary, Alberta       T2N 3Y4
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