PC-based EEG

D. Loiselle lsll at troi.cc.rochester.edu
Thu Sep 23 11:56:39 EST 1993


In <27s0l1$43f at bart.meiko.com> pje at meiko.co.uk (Patrick Evans) writes:

>Is there anyone out there who has experience in using a PC with
>A-D card as an EEG system ? Is the idea sensible ? the basic parameters
>(storage space requirements etc), seem to stack up  OK. 

>Any thoughts, anyone ? What about software ?

>Patrick Evans,
>pje at meiko.co

Presently there are about 11 companies, ranging from the big biys (Nicolet, Biologic, Cadwell) to fairly small operations
that are marketing digital EEG machines. The majority of these are based on
'386 and (mostly) '486 systems. Nicolet and NCI use a UNIX variant to allow
multitasking. Most of these systems aren't too bad. The big issues are 1) screen resolution and 2) ability to manipulate EEG data as simply as paper.
Screen resolution is now pretty good as most use SVGA or TIGA. Data manipulation
is lagging behind. It is difficult to flip screen back and forth as easily as
paper records. 

The next big push with these machines is networking. All are claiming some sort
of networking capabilities, with NeuroConcepts, Inc (NCI) seeming to have the
lead in this area right now.

The issue of data storage is quite valid. We are looking to use DEEG for
long term monitoring of epilepsy patients. We will be recording up to 128
channels for 24 or more hours. That is a LOT of data to store.


If anyone has experience with DEEG systems (especially with the Nicolet
Voyageur or the NCI Uniquant) I would appreciate hearing from you. We are
going to purchase systems in the near future to network  our long-term
monitoring, outpatient and inpatient EEG labs, and operating rooms.

Respond either via e-mail or to this newsgroup. I will summarize response
if a sufficient number arrive.

Thanks in advance.

David L. Loiselle, Ph.D.
Clinical Neurophysiology Laboratory
University of Rochester Medical Center
lsll at troi.cc.rochester.edu
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