Australian Neuroscientists

Peter Dodd peterD at qimr.edu.au
Tue Aug 23 01:06:28 EST 1994


NAME: Dr Wickliffe C Abraham
POSITION: Senior Lecturer
ADDRESS: University of Otago, Box 56, DUNEDIN, NEW ZEALAND PHONE NO:
(643) 479 7648
FAX NO: (643) 479 8335
EMAIL: cabraham at otago.ac.nz
SUBJECT AREAS
Neuronal and transmitter plasticity; Messenger RNA regulation. RESEARCH
INTERESTS
The research focuses on the mechanisms of induction and maintenance of long-
term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) in rat hippocampus. The 
LTP studies currently concentrate on factors which influence the decay of LTP, 
plus the relation of LTP maintenance of changes in gene expression. The LTD 
studies deal with voltage-dependent and calcium-dependent mechanisms in the 
induction of LTD. The possibility that there is more than one form of LTD is  being
examined.
TECHNIQUES USED
Extracellular and intracellular/voltage clamp techniques in slices; Chronic  recording
of field potentials; Northern blot and in situ hybridization analysis  of mRNA and
immunohistochemistry; differential screening.
KEY REFERENCES
Christie, B.R., & Abraham, W.C. (1992). NMDA-dependent heterosynaptic
long-term  depression in the dentate gyrus of anaesthetized rats. Synapse, 10, 1-6; 
Abraham, W.C., Dragunow, M., & Tate, W.P. (1992). The role of immediate early 
genes in the stablization of long-term potentiation. Molecular Neurobiology, 5, 
297-314; Richardson, C.L., Tate, W.P., Mason, S.E., Lawlor, P.A., Dragunow, M., 
& Abraham, W.C. (1992). Correlation between the induction of an immediate early 
gene, zif/268, and long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus. Brain Research, 
580, 147-154; Christie, B.R., & Abraham, W.C. (1992). Priming of associative 
long-term depression by theta frequency synaptic activity, Neuron, 8, 79-84, 
Demmer, J., Dragunow, M., Lawlor, P.A., Mason, S.E., Leah, J.D., Abraham, W.C., 
Tate, W.P. (1993). Differential expression of immediate early genes after 
hippocampal long-term potentiation in awake rats. Molecular Brain Research, 17, 
279-286.


NAME: Associate Professor V A Alder
POSITION: NH&MRC Senior Research Fellow, Director of Visual Neurophysiology
ADDRESS: Lions Eye Institute, The University of Western Australia, NEDLANDS, 
WA, 6009
PHONE NO: (619) 389 3314
FAX NO: (619) 382 1171
SUBJECT AREAS
Blood-brain barrier; CNS/PNS neurophysiology; Cardiovascular regulation and 
regulation of other autonomic functions.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Retinal vascular physiology; Retinal electrophysiology; Retinal blood flow;  Retinal
vascular pharmacology; Retinal oxygenation.
TECHNIQUES USED
Isolated vessel pharmacology; Microelectrode oxygen, blood flow & neural  function
recording.
KEY REFERENCES
Alder, V.A. & Cringle, C.J. (1989).  Intraretinal and vitreal PO2 response to  acutely
raised intracocular pressure in cat.  American Journal of Physiology,  256 (Heart Circ,
Physiol, 25): H1627-H1634.;Alder, V.A., Ben-Nun, J. & Cringle,  S.J. (1990).  PO2
profiles and oxygen consumption in cat retina with an  occluded retinal circulation. 
Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science,  31: 1029-1034.;Alder, V.A., Yu, D-Y.
& Cringle, S.J. (1991).  Vitreal oxygen  tension measurements in the rat eye. 
Experimental Eye Research.  52: 293- 299.;Alder, V.A., Yu, D-Y., Cringle, S.J. & Su,
E-N. (1991).  Changes in  vitreal oxygen tension distribution in the streptozotocin
diabetic rat.   Diabetologia, 34: 469-476.;Yu, D-Y., Alder, V.A. & Cringle, S.J. (1990).  
Measurement of blood flow in the rat eye by hydrogen clearance.  American  Journal
of Physiology, 261 (Heart Circ. Physiol. 30): H960- H968.;Alder, V.A., Su, E-N., Yu,
D-Y. & Cringle, S.J. (1992).  Oxygen  reactivity of the feline isolated ophthalmociliary
artery.  Investigative  Ophthalmology and Visual Science (in press).


NAME: Dr E E Ball
POSITION: Senior Fellow
ADDRESS: Molecular Neurobiology Group, Research School of Biological Sciences, 
Australian National University, GPO Box 475, CANBERRA  ACT  2601 PHONE NO:
(616) 249 4496
FAX NO: (616) 249 4891
EMAIL: ball at rsbs8.anu.edu.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Cell structure; Cell birth;Migration and death; Endocrine, biochemical and 
pharmacological correlates of development; Neuronal and transmitter plasticity; 
Synaptogenesis,morphogenesis; Membrane composition and cell-surface 
macromolecules; Messenger RNA regulation; gene structure and function;Structure 
and function of identified cells.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Role and occurrence of transcription factors in neural and non-neural 
tissues;Evolution of homeobox genes;The nature and role of axonal guidance cues  in
neuromuscular development in invertebrates.
TECHNIQUES USED
Gene cloning and sequencing; in situ hybridization; Immunocytochemical  techniques;
Dye filling; embryo culture.
KEY REFERENCES
Myers, C.M., Whitington, P.M., & Ball, E.E. (1990). Embryonic development of  the
innervation of the locust extensor tibiae muscle by identified neurons.  Formation and
elimination of inappropriate axon branches. Developmental  Biology, 137,
194-206;Boyan, G.S., & Ball, E.E. (1990). Neuronal organization  and information
processing in the wind-
sensitive cercal receptor/giant interneurone system of the locust and other 
orthopteroid insects. Progress in Neurobiology, 35, 217-243;Ball, E.E., Rehm,  E.J. &
Goodman, C.S. (1991). Cloning of a grasshoper cDNA coding for a protein 
homologous to the A1, A2/B1 proteins of mammalian hnRNP. Nucleic Acids 
Research, 19, 397; Patel, N.H., Ball, E.E. & Goodman, C.S. (1992). Changing  role of
even-skipped during the evolution of insect pattern formation. Nature,  357, 339-342;
Bastiani, M.J., de Couet, H.G., Quinn, J.M.A., Karlstrom, R.O.,  Kotrla, K., Goodman,
C.S. & Ball, E.E. (1992). Position-specific expression of  the annulin protein during
grasshopper embryogenesis. Developmental Biology,  153, 129-142.


NAME: Dr P F Bartlett
POSITION: Head, Laboratory of Neuroimmunology
ADDRESS: Neuroimmunology Laboratory, The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute , of 
Medical Research, PO Box, Royal Melbourne Hospital, PARKVILLE  VIC  3050
PHONE NO: (613) 345 2538/2555
FAX NO: (613) 347 0852
SUBJECT AREAS
Cell structure; Endocrine, biochemical and pharmacological correlates of 
development;Neuronal and transmitter plasticity; Membrane composition and cell-
surface macromolecules; Messenger RNA regulation, gene structure and function; 
Myelin; Neuropathology; Spinal cord and somatic afferents; Spinal cord and  brain
stem; CNS; Implants, neurotrophic; PNS; Transplants; Mammals. RESEARCH
INTERESTS
The main aim of the laboratory is to identify factors, both epigenetic and  intrinsic, that
regulate the early developmental events in the mammalian CNS  and PNS. The
proliferation and differentiation of neural precursors contained  within the
neuroepithelium and neural crest are studied in vitro and growth  factors have been
identified that regulate both these events. Purification and  gene cloning of novel
neurotrophic factors is also being carried out, using  specially constructed cell lines as
the source of factors. A corollary of these  studies is the application of growth factors
to neurological disease states.  The laboratory also has an interest in the role MHC
molecules play in the  pathogenesis of diseases such as MS. Recent studies indicate
that aberrant  over-expression of these molecules in oligodendrocytes can lead to
profound  dysmyelination.
TECHNIQUES USED
In vitro cell culture; Immunotechniques; Protein purification; Gene cloning;  Subtractive
hybridization; Retroviral infection of pleural cells. KEY REFERENCES
Bartlett, P.F., & Kilpatrick, T.J. (1991). Recent advances in the  neuroimmunology of
demyelinating diseases. Curr. Op. in Neurology and  Neurosurgery, 4, 181-185;
Murphy, M., Bernard, O., Reid, K., & Bartlett, P.F.  (1991). Cell lines derived from
mouse neural crest are representative of cells  at various stages of differentiation.
Journal of Neurobiology, 22, 522- 535; Murphy, M., Reid, K., Hilton, D.J., & Bartlett,
P.F. (1991). Generation of  sensory neurons is stimulated by leukemia inhibitory
factor. Proc. Nat. Acad.  Sci. (USA), 88, 3498-
3501.


NAME: Dr P M Beart
POSITION: Principal Research Fellow (Associate Professor)
ADDRESS: Department of Pharmacology, Monash University, CLAYTON  VIC  3168
PHONE NO: (613) 565 3817
FAX NO: (613) 565 5851
SUBJECT AREAS
Amino acids; Biochemical pharmacology; Interaction between neurotransmitters  and
neuromodulation; Peptides: localization, biosynthesis and processing,  metabolism,
characterization and physiological effects; Cardiovascular  regulation and regulation of
other autonomic functions, Mammals. RESEARCH INTERESTS
The laboratory concentrates its efforts on the biochemical pharmacology of  drugs
affecting the CNS, and especially the neurochemical pharmacology &  anatomy of
excitatory amino acids (glutamate & aspartate) so as to elucidate  the characteristics
of their receptors and to define their physiological roles. Key interests are: Receptor
localization and dynamics, especially after drug  regimes; Receptor characterization by
ligand binding techniques; Mapping of  topographic organization of pathways;
Molecular modelling of agonists,  antagonists & receptors; Syntheses of new receptor
probes. Other interests include cholecystokinin, central regulation of blood pressure & 
neurological diseases.
TECHNIQUES USED
Autoradiography, Receptor binding, Hybridization histochemistry, Synthesis of  novel
ligands, Stereotaxic lesion, Computerized molecular modelling. KEY REFERENCES
Beart et al (1990). Excitatory amino acid projections to the periaqueductal  gray in the
rat: a retrograde transport study utilizing D(3H) aspartate and  (3H) GABA.
Neuroscience 34, 331-
339; Beart et al (1991). (125I) Ifenprodil: a convenient radioligand for  binding and
autoradiographic studies of the polyamine-sensitive site of the  NMDA receptor.
Neurosci. Lett., 124, 187-189; O'Shea et al. (1991). Evidence  for heterogeneous
glycine domains but conserved multiple agonist states of the  NMDA receptor. Exp.
Brain Res. 86, 652-662; Carlberg et al. (1992).  Autoradiographic localization of CCKA
and CCKB receptors in rat brain using  (125I) D-Tyr25 (Nle 28, 31) CCk 25-33S. Eur
J. Neurosci. 4, 563-573, Loiacono &  Beart (1992). Hippocampal lesions induced by
the microinjection of the nitric  oxide nitroprusside. Eur. J. Pharmacol. 216, 331-333.


NAME: Dr Lyn Beazley
POSITION: Principal Research Fellow, NH&MRC
ADDRESS: Department of Psychology, The University of Western Australia, 
NEDLANDS  WA  6009
PHONE NO: (619) 380 2643
FAX NO: (619) 380 1006
SUBJECT AREAS
Cell structure; Cell birth, migration and death; Endocrine, biochemical and 
pharmacological correlates of development; Neuronal and transmitter plasticity, 
Synaptogenesis, morphogenesis; Blood-brain barriers; CNS/PNS neurophysiology; 
Retina and visual pathways; CNS; Comparative neuroanatomy; Fish; Amphibia; 
Mammals.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Our research concerns the development and regeneration of the retina, optic  nerve
and visual centres in vertebrates.  In particular we investigate patterns  in which cells
are generated, migrate and die and the formation of neural  pathways and specific
functional nerve connections.  To do so we use mainly the  visual systems of two
groups of vertebrates.
One is the amphibia, in which we carry out studies throughout development and 
during regeneration of the severed adult optic nerve.  One of our major  contributions
has been to be the first to report that, contrary to standard  dogma, almost half the
population of ganglion cells dies during optic nerve  regeneration in frogs.  We are
now striving to discover why some cells survive  and regenerate whilst others die.
The other model we use extensively is the developing marsupial, since young are 
born and are therefore accessible from stages far less developed than any  cutherian. 
Using these animals, we were the first to appreciate that cell  generation in the
mammalian retina, as in the brain, takes place in two phases;  these phases are
matched by two phases of cell death.  Other recent studies  investigate the conditions
necessary to stimulate optic nerve regeneration in  adult mammals.
TECHNIQUES USED
Light and electron microscopy; immunohistochemistry; single cell injection;  axonal
tracing; thymidine labelling; electrophysiology.
KEY REFERENCES
Humphrey, M.F., Darby, J.E., & Beazley, L.D. (1989). Retinal ganglion cell  death is
transiently delayed when optic nerve regeneration is prevented in the  frog Hyla
moorei. J. Comp. Neurol. 279, 187-198; Dann, J.F., & Beazley, L.D.  (1989).
Neurogenesis & cell death in the isthmic nucleus of the frog  Limnodynastes dorsalis.
J. Comp. Neurol. 284, 28-37; Coleman, L.A., & Beazley.  L.D. (1989). Expanded visual
projections to the dorsal lateral geniculate  nucleus and superior colliculus following
early unilateral eye removal in the  wallaby Setonix brachyurus. Dev. Brain Res. 48,
273-291.


NAME: Dr C Bell
POSITION: Reader in Physiology
ADDRESS: Department of Physiology, The University of Melbourne Medical Centre, 
MELBOURNE  VIC  3052
PHONE NO: (613) 344 5869
FAX NO: (613) 344 5818
EMAIL:
SUBJECT AREAS
Cell birth, migration and death; Endocrine, biochemical and pharmacological 
correlates of development, Neuronal and transmitter plasticity, Cellular  aspects of
disease, Structure and function of identified cells, Aging, Diseases  of the nervous
system, Catecholamines, serotonin, histamine and other biogenic  amines, Peptides:
localization, biosynthesis and processing, metabolism,  characterization and
physiological effects, Cardiovascular regulation and  regulation of other autonomic
functions, Muscle and disorders of motor systems,  Implants, neurotrophic etc, PNS;
Mammals, Human, Transmitters and  neuropeptides-chemical coding; Autonomic
ganglia, Preganglionic neurones,  Neuroimmunology.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Neurochemical correlates of growth and ageing in autonomic and somatic nervous 
systems, Plasticity of phenotypes and neurochemical profiles during development  and
ageing, Autoimmunity in neurodegenerative disease.
TECHNIQUES USED
Computerised image analysis of morphometric and histochemical parameters, 
immunocytochemistry, biochemistry, retrograde tracing.
KEY REFERENCES
Gurusinghe, C.J. et al. (1991). J. Neurosci. Res. 29: 68-76; Bell, C. (1991).  Proc.
Aust. Physiol. Pharmac. Soc. 22: 89-108; Messina, A. & Bell, C. (1991).  Neuro Report
2: 45-48; Hendry, I.A. et al. (1992). Neurosci. Lett. 148, 117- 120, Messina, A., & Bell,
C. (1993). Mech. Ageing Devel. 67, 211-223, Hendry,  I.A., & Bell, C. (1993). J.
Neurochem., 60, 1093-1097, Mann, R., & Bell, C.  (1993). J. Auton. Nerv. Syst., 43,
107-116.


NAME: Professor M R Bennett
POSITION: Professor & Director, Neurobiology Laboratory
ADDRESS: Physiology Department, University of Sydney, SYDNEY  NSW  2006
PHONE NO: (612) 692 2034
FAX NO: (612) 692 4740
SUBJECT AREAS
Neuronal and transmitter plasticity, Synaptic structure and function,  presynaptic and
postsynaptic mechanisms; Birds, Mammals; Neuroeffector  mechanisms; Smooth and
cardiac muscle; Autonomic ganglia; Preganglionic  neurones.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Quantal secretory mechanisms at synapses and plasticity of quantal secretory 
mechanisms.
TECHNIQUES USED
Electrophysiology; Tissue culture; Slices; Imaging; Biochmeical separation of 
molecules.
KEY REFERENCES
Bennett, M. R. & Walmsley, B. (1992).  What determines the strength of a  synaptic
connection? International Brain Research Organization News. 20,6- 7.;Lavidis, N.A. &
Bennett, M.R. (1992).  Probabilistic secretion of quanta  from visualized synpathethic
nerve varicosities in mouse vas deferens.  Journal  of Physiology, 454, 9-26, Gibson,
N.G., Robinson, J. & Bennett, M.R. (1991).  Probabilistic secretion of quanta at
granule cell synapses, A role in pattern  separation & activity regulation.  Philosophical
Transactions of the Royal  Society Series B. 332, 199-220.


NAME: Bill Blessing
POSITION: NH & MRC Principal Research Fellow
ADDRESS: Department of Medicine, Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park  SA  
5042
PHONE NO: (61) 8 204 4736
FAX NO: (61) 8 204 5450
SUBJECT AREAS
Theme C 17, Theme F 33, Theme I 50, Theme J 55.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Medulla oblongata and control of cardiovascular and gastrointestinal function.
TECHNIQUES USED
Functional and anatomical techniques including cfos & Herpes simplex virus 
transneuronal transport.
KEY REFERENCES
Gai, W.P., Geffen, L.B., Denoroy, L. & Blessing, W.W. (1993). Loss of C1 and C3 
epinephrine-synthesizing neurons in the medulla oblongata in Parkinson's  disease.
Ann. Neuro., 33: 35Ä367, Gieroba, Z.J. & Blessing, W.W. (1993).   Abdominal vagal
afferents excite A1 area neurons antidromically activated fro  the region of the
supraoptic nucleus in the rabbit. Brain Res. 616: 181-187,  Li, Y.W., Ding, Z.Q.,
Wesselingh, S.L., & Blessing, (1993).  Renal symapthetic  preganglionic neurons
demonstrated by Herpes simplex virus trensneuronal  labelling in the rabbit: Close
apposition of neuropeptide Y-immonoreactive  terminals. Neurosci. 53: 1143-1152, Li,
Y.W., Wesselingh, S.L. & Blessing, W.W.  (1992). Projections from rabbit caudal
medulla to C1 and A5 sympathetic  premotor neurons, demonstrated with phaseolus
leucoagglutinin and herpes  simplex virus. J. Comp. Neurol. 317: 379-395.


NAME: Dr M K Boelen
POSITION: Lecturer
ADDRESS: Centre for Research on Ageing, La Trobe UCNV , MELBOURNE VIC 
3550 PHONE NO: 054 44 7222
FAX NO: 054 44 7777
EMAIL:
SUBJECT AREAS
Opiates, endorphins and enkephalins; Anatomy, biochemistry and physiology  effects;
Metabolism of transmitters and modulators; Peptide, localization,  biosynthesis and
processing, metabolism, characterization and physiological  effects; Biochemical
pharmacology; Ageing; Retina and visual pathways; Birds. RESEARCH INTERESTS
Metabolism and physiology of neuropeptides in vertebrate retina. TECHNIQUES
USED
RIA; HPLC; Tissue-superfusion
KEY REFERENCES
Boelen et al. (1989).  Brain Res. 488: 43-48;Dowton et al. (1990).  Neurosci.  38: 187-
193;Boelen et al. (1991). Brain Res. 557: 221-226.


NAME: Joel C. Bornstein
POSITION: Senior Lecturer
ADDRESS: Department of Physiology, University of Melbourne, PARKVILLE  VIC  
3052, AUSTRALIA
PHONE NO: (03) 344 5850
FAX NO: (03) 344 5818
EMAIL: joel at plexus.physiol.unimelb.edu.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Theme M: 69, 70, 71, 72; Theme L: 66; Theme G: 43; Theme E: 22, 25, 26, 28, 29 
31.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Analysis of the neuronal circuitry controlling reflexes in the gut; Autonomic 
neuro-effector transmission; Synaptic transmission at autonomic synapses;  Computer
simulation of neuronal circuits, with emphasis on the enteric nervous  system
TECHNIQUES USED
Intracellular recording from enteric neurons and intestinal smooth muscle;  Injection of
intracellular markers to allow correlation of the morphology and  projections of neurons
with their electrophysiological properties and their  neurochemistries determined with
immunohistochemical procedures; Anatomically  and physiologically realistic simulation
of the enteric circuits involved in  control of motility, Pharmacological analysis of
intestinal motility reflexes  in vitro, Intracellular recordings from muscle or neurons
during  physiologically evoked intestinal reflexes.
KEY REFERENCES
Bornstein, J.C., Furness, J.B., Smith, T.K. & Trussell, D.C. (1991). Synaptic 
responses evoked by mechanical stimulation of the mucosa in morphologically 
characterized myenteric neurons of the guinea pig ileum. J. Neurosci., 11: 505- 518,
Bornstein, J.C., Hendriks, R., Furness, J.B. & Trussell, C.C. (1991).  Ramifications of
the axons of AH-neurons injected with the intracellular marker  biocytin in the
myenteric plexus of the guinea pig small intestine. J. Comp.  Neurol., 314: 437-451,
Furness, J.B., & Bornstein, J.C., The enteric nervous  system and its extrinsic
connections. In T. Yamada (Ed). Textbook of  Gastroenterology. J.B. Lippincott
Company, Philadelphia, 1991 pp. 2 - 24,  Kunze, W.A.A., Furness, J.B., & Bornstein,
J.C. (1993). Simultaneous  intracellular recordings from enteric neurons reveals that
myenteric AH neurons  transmit via slow excitatory post-synaptic potentials,
Neuroscience. 55: 685- 694, Smith, T.K., Bornstein, J.C., & Furness, J.B. (1991).
Interactions between  reflexes evoked by distension and mucosal stimulation:
electrophysiological  studies of guinea-pig ileum. J. Auton. Nerv. Syst., 34: 69-76,
Smith, T.K.,  Bornstein, J.C. & Furness, J.B. (1992). Convergence fo reflex pathways
excited  by distension and mechanically deforming the mucosa onto morphologically 
characterized myenteric neurons of the guinea-pig small intestine. J.  Neurosci., 12:
1502-1510.


NAME: Dr J H Boublik
POSITION: Head,Peptide Chemistry Laboratory
ADDRESS: Peptide Chemistry Laboratory, Baker Medical Research Institute, P O 
Box 348, PRAHRAN  VIC  3181
PHONE NO: (613) 522 4389
FAX NO: (613) 521 1362.
SUBJECT AREAS
Cardiovascular regulation by peptides.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Peptide Chemistry; Structure Activity Relationships of Cardiovascularly active 
peptides; Current Projects, Neuropeptide and Conotoxin Glia. TECHNIQUES USED
Solid phase peptide synthesis, Manual & Auto; HF cleavage, HPLC Purification; 
Characterization NMR/Mass Spec by collaboration.
KEY REFERENCES
Feinstein, R.D., Boublik, J.H., Kirby D. et al (1992). J. Med. Chem, 35, 2836- 2843,
McDermott J.R., Gibson, A.M., Boublik, J.H., et al (1992). Biochem. Soc.  Trans., 20,
351S.


NAME: Dr P J Brent
POSITION: Research Scientist
ADDRESS: Faculty of Medicine, University of Newcastle, Level 5, Clinical  Sciences
Building, Mater Hospital, WARATAH  NSW  2298
PHONE NO: (049) 211 295
FAX NO: (049) 602 088
SUBJECT AREAS
Diseases of the nervous system; Biochemical pharmacology; Catecholamines, 
serotonin, histamine and other biogenic amines; Metabolism of transmitters and 
modulators; Opiates, endorphins, and enkephalins: anatomy, biochemistry and 
physiology effects; Transmitter receptors; Transmitters and receptors in  disease;
Basal ganglia, vestibular and oculomotor systems; Control of posture  and movement;
Muscle and disorders of motor systems.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Psychopharmacology of drugs of addiction, Dopamine agonists and antagonists, 
sigma and PCP ligands; Actions of these drugs at molecular level, signal  transduction
potential clinical uses; Role of sigma binding sites, dopamine and  opioids in control of
movement.
TECHNIQUES USED
Behavioural pharmacology histology; HPLC; Radioligand binding; Autoradiography, 
GEL Electrophoresis, Immunoblotting.
KEY REFERENCES
Bot, G., Chahl, L.A., Brent, P.J. and Johnston, P.A. (1992).  Effects of 
intracerebroventricularly administered mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid agonists on 
locomotor activity of the guinea-pig and the pharmacology of the locomotor  response
to U50, 488H.  Neuropharmacology, 31, 825-833, Brent, P.J. (1991a).   The
behavioural effects of selective dopamine D-1 and D-2 agonists and  antagonists in
guinea-pigs.  Psychopharmacology, 104: 201-207.; Brent, P.J.  (1991b).  Similar
behavioural effects of sigma agonists and PCP-like non- competitive NMDA
antagonists in guinea-pigs.  Psychopharmacology, 105: 421- 427.; Brent, P.J. and Bot,
G. (1992).  Morphine, D-Pen2, D-Pen5 Enkephalin and  U50, 488H differentially affect
the locomotor activity and behaviours induced  by quinpirole in guinea-
pigs.  Psychopharmacology, 107, 518-590, Brent, P.J. and Chahl, L.A. (1991).  
Effects of naloxone-precipitated withdrawal after a single dose of morphine on 
catecholamine concentrations in guinea-pigs.  Neurochem Res, 16: 525-531.;  Brent,
P.J., Johnston, P.A. and Chahl, L.A. (1988).  Increased plasma  catecholamines and
locomotor activity induced by centrally administered  substance P in guinea-pigs. 
Neuropharmacol, 27: 743-748, Brent, P.J. (1993).  Behavioural effect of pretreatment
with opioid antagonists and sigma binding  site ligands on the abnormal motor
response produced by the kappa opioid  agonist U50, 488H in guinea-pigs.
Neuropharmacology, In press, Brent, P.J.,  Chahl, L.A., Cantarella, P.A., & Kavanagh,
C. (1993). The k-opioid receptor  agonist U50, 488H induces acute physical
dependence in guinea-pigs. Eur. J.  Pharmacol, In press, Brent, P.J., & Chahl, L.A.
(1993). Enhancement of the  opiate withdrawal response by antipsychotic drugs in
guinea-pigs is not  mediated by sigma binding sites. Eur. Neuropsychopharmacol, 3,
23-32. 

NAME: Dr T E Bridges
POSITION: Senior Lecturer in Pharmacology
ADDRESS: Dentistry, University of Adelaide, ADELAIDE  SA  5005 PHONE NO: (618)
303 5677
FAX NO: (618) 232 4062
SUBJECT AREAS
Interaction between neurotransmitters and neuromodulation; Opiates, endorphins,  and
enkephalins, anatomy, biochemistry and physiology effects; Peptides:  localization,
biosynthesis and processing, metabolism, characterization and  physiological effects;
Pain: central pathways and modulation; Stress, hormones  and the autonomic nervous
system; Other sensory systems; Mammals; Human;  Neuroeffector mechanisms.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Allometric relationships of the posterior pituitary hormones and the influence  of
habitat; Roles of neuropeptides and biogenic amines in the modulation of  pain,
inflammation and vascular tone in dental pulp.
TECHNIQUES USED
Hormone bioassays; peptide assays by HPLC, biogenic amine assays by HPLC. KEY
REFERENCES
Bridges, T.E. & Marino, V. (1987).  Life Sciences, 41, 2815-2822., Malkinson,  T.J.,
Bridges, T.E., Veale, W. & Lederis, K. (1987).  Peptides, 8, 385- 389.;Laparidis, S. &
Bridges, T.E. (1991).  Australian Dent. J. 36, 318-319,  Phrabhakaran, N., Bridges,
T.E., & Brown, K.A. (1991). J. Forensic Odonto- Stomatology, 9, 1-16.


NAME: Dr J Brinkman
POSITION: Lecturer in Psychology
ADDRESS: Department of Psychology, School of Life Sciences, The Australian 
National University, GPO Box 4, CANBERRA  2601
PHONE NO: (616) 249 2803 / 249 2795
FAX NO: (616) 249 0499
SUBJECT AREAS
Motor Systems and Sensorimotor Integration in Primates
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Control of movement by the brain: the roles of the supplementary and premotor  areas
of the cerebral cortex studied with chronic recording techniques in  monkeys, or with
lesion techniques; motor learning and development in monkeys;  cerebral hemispheric
lateralization and hand preference in monkeys; development  and determinants of
hand preference in monkeys; plasticity of motor systems. TECHNIQUES USED
Behavioural testing of normal and lesioned animals; observation and scoring of 
behaviour; videoanalysis of movement (computer-aided) neurophysiological  recording
in conscious monkeys (at present discontinued but expected to be up  and running
again by 1993).
KEY REFERENCES
Brinkman, J., Colebath, J.G., Porter, R., & York, D.H. (1985). Responses of 
precentral cells during cooling of postcentral cortex in conscious monkeys. J.  Physiol.
368: 611-625, Brinkman, C. (1986). Macaca fascicularis for medical  research: the
colony of the John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian  National University,
Canberra. Austr. Primatol. 1(4): 3-6; Ghosh, S., Brinkman  C., & Porter, R. (1987). A
quantitative study of the distribution of neurons  projecting to the precentral motor
cortex in the monkey. (Macaca fascicularis)  J. comp. Neurol. 258: 424-444.


NAME: Dr E Burcher
POSITION: NH & MRC Principal Research Fellow, & Associate Professor ADDRESS:
School of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of New South Wales,  SYDNEY 
NSW  2000
PHONE: (612) 697 2562
FAX NO: (612) 313 6043
SUBJECT AREAS
Neurochemistry and neuropharmacology; neurotransmitters, modulators, and 
receptors; Peptides; Transmitter receptors.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Localization and characterization of tachykinin receptors in peripheral  tissues. 
Present investigations include: Autoradiographic localization and  characterization of
receptors for tachykinins and CGRP in gastrointestinal  tract and urinogenital tract, in
rat and guinea-pig.  The effect of capsaicin  pretreatment and denervation on
localization, affinity and number of NK1 and  NK2 receptors.  Development of new
selective radioligands.  Investigation of  receptor subtypes.  Investigation of function of
sensory neuropeptides in  guinea-pig and human respiratory system.
TECHNIQUES USED
Isolated organ pharmacology; in vitro autoradiography; radioligand binding in 
membranes; radioligand development.
KEY REFERENCES
Mussap, C.J., Geraghty, D.P., & Burcher, E. (1993). Tachykinin receptors: A 
radioligand binding perspective. (invited review) J. Neurochem. 60: 1987-2009; 
Geraghty, D.P., Mussap, C.J., & Burcher, E. (1992). Radioiodinated substance P, 
neurokinin A and eledoisin bind predominantly to NK1 receptors in guinea-pig  lung.
Mol. Pharmacol. 41: 147-153, Black, J.L., Diment, L.M., Alouan, L.A.,  Johnson,
P.R.A., Armour, C.L., Badgery-Parker, T., & Burcher, E. (1992).  Tachykinin receptros
in rabbit airways - characterisation using functional,  autoradiographic and binding
studies. Br. J. Pharmacol. 107: 429-436, Geraghty,  D.P., & Burcher, E. (1993). Two
classes of binding sites for [3H]-substance P  in rat cerebral cortex. Brain Res. 601:
34-40; Burcher, E., Badgery-Parker, T.,  Zeng, X.P., & Lavielle, S. (1993).
Characterization of a novel selective  radioligand, [125I]-[Lys5, Tyr(I2)7, MeLeu9,
Nle10] - NKA (4-10), for the  tachykinin NK2 receptor in rat fundus. Eur. J. Pharmacol.
233: 201-207. 

NAME: Dr M B Calford
POSITION: NH & MRC Senior Research Fellow
ADDRESS: Vision Touch & Hearing Research Centre, University of Queensland, 
QUEENSLAND  4072  PHONE NO: (617) 365 3929
FAX NO: (617) 365 1766
SUBJECT AREAS
Auditory; Somatosensory pathways; Retina and visual pathways; A-plasticity; 
Mammals.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Plasticity of the adult neocortex: Using somatosensory and auditory  representations
as models we are investigating the basis of short-term  plasticity following partial
peripheral denervation; Organization and  connection of somatosensory and visual
cortical representations in  megachiropteran bats; Role of cochlear-generated
intermodulation distortion  products in the encoding and perception of complex
sounds. TECHNIQUES USED
Neurophysiological recording - extracellular; Neuroanatomical pathway tracing; 
Complex sound generation and presentation
KEY REFERENCES
Calford, M.B. & Tweedale R. (1990). Interhemispheric transfer of plasticity in  the
cerebral cortex. Science 249:805-807, Calford, M.B. & Tweedale R. (1991).  Acute
changes in cutaneous receptive fields in primary somatosensory cortex  following digit
denervation in adult flying fox. J. Neurophysiol. 65: 178-187,  Calford, M.B. &
Tweedale (1991) C-fibers provide a source of masking inhibition  to primary
somatosensory cortex. Proc. Roy. Soc. B, 243: 269-275. 

NAME: Dr P Carrive
POSITION: Postdoctoral (SRA- NHMRC)
ADDRESS: Psychology & Anatomy, University of New South Wales, P.O. Box 2, 
Kensington NSW 2033
PHONE NO: (612) 697 3755
FAX NO: (612) 662 6279
EMAIL: P. Carrive at unsw.ed.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Cardiovascular regulation and regulation of other autonomic functions;  Respiratory
regulation; Spinal cord and brain stem; Motivation, emotion and  behaviour; Mammals.
RESEARCH INTERESTS Functional organization of midbrain - medullary projections.  
Their role in the integration of somatic and autonomic components of defensive 
behaviour.
TECHNIQUES USED
Microinjections of excilatory amino acid; Recording of cardiovascular and  respiratory
parameters (BP, EMG, Flow); Retrograde- anterograde tracing  (fluoresent
microbeads, Biocytin). Immunohistochemistry; Virus transneuronal  tracing.
KEY REFERENCES
Carrive, P., Bandler, R., & Dampney, R.A.L. (1989). Somatic and autonomic 
integration in the midbrain of the unanesthetized decerebrate cat: a  distinctive pattern
evoked by excitation of neurones in the subtentorial  portion of the midbrain
periaqueductal grey. Brain Res., 483, 251-258, Carrive,  P., Bandler, R., & Dampney,
R.A.L. (1989). Viscerotopic control of regional  vascular beds by discrete groups of
neurons within the midbrain periaqueductal  gray. Brain Res., 493, 385-390, Carrive,
P., & Bandler, R. (1991). Viscerotopic  organization of neurons subserving hypotensive
reactions within the midbrain  periaqueductal grey: a correlative functional and
anatomical study. Brain Res.,  541, 206-215, Carrive, P.  The midbrain periaqueductal
gray and defensive  behavior: functional representation and neuronal organization.
Behav. Brain  Res., In press.


NAME: Associate Professor L A Chahl
POSITION: Associate Professor in Clinical Pharmacology
ADDRESS: Faculty of Medicine, University of Newcastle, NEWCASTLE  NSW.  2308  
PHONE NO: (614) 926 6177
FAX NO: (614) (049) 602 088
SUBJECT AREAS
Opioids and tachykinins; localization and physiological effects. RESEARCH
INTERESTS
Major research interest is a study of the neuropharmacology of the effects of  opiates
and opioid peptides in the central nervous system with particular  emphasis on the
mechanism underlying opioid withdrawal and the role of  tachykinins.
TECHNIQUES USED
Animal behavioural techniques; immunohistochemistry; In situ hydridization 
histochemistry.
KEY REFERENCES
Johnston, P.A., & Chahl, L.A. (1991). Tachykinin antagonists inhibit the  morphine
withdrawal response in guinea-pigs, Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Arch.  Pharmac. 343,
383Ä388, Bot, G., Chahl, L.A., Brent, P.J., & Johnston, P.A.  (1992). Effects of
intracerebroventricularly administered mu-, delta- and  kappa-opioid agonists on
locomotor activity of the guinea pig and the  pharmacology of the locomotor response
to U50, 488H, Neuropharmacology, 31,  825-833, Gallagher, A.W., Chahl, L.A., &
Lynch, A.M. (1992). Distribution of  substance P-like immunoreactivity in guinea pig
central nervous system, Brain  Res. Bull., 29, 199-207.


NAME: Dr T Chan-Ling
POSITION: R Douglas Wright Fellow, NH&MRC
ADDRESS: Department of Anatomy & Histology, University of Sydney, SYDNEY 
NSW   2006
PHONE NO: (02) 692 2596
FAX NO: (02) 552 2026
SUBJECT AREAS
Blood-brain barrier; Glia; Cellular aspects of disease; Retina and visual  pathways.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Pathogenesis of retinopathy of prematurity and cerebral malaria; Astrocyte -  vascular
- neuronal interactions in the retina; Blood-retinal barrier;  Vasculogenesis; glial
lineage.
TECHNIQUES USED
Animal models of Retinopathy of Prematurity; Animal models of Cerebral Malaria; 
Immunocytochemistry, tissue culture, Hybridisation histochemistry. KEY
REFERENCES
Chan-Ling, T. & Stone, J. (1991). Factors determining the shape, spacing & 
distribution of astrocytes in the cat retina; The contact-spacing model of  astrocyte
interaction. J. Comp. Neurol. 303: 3 387-399.;Chan-Ling, T., Neill,  A. & Hunt, N.
(1992).  Early microvascular changes in murine cerebral malaria  detected in retinal
wholemounts. Am J. Path. 140, 1121-
1130; Chan-Ling, T. & Stone, J. (1992). Degeneration of astrocytes in  retinopathy of
prematurity causes failure of the blood-retinal barrier. Invest  Ophthalmol Vis. Sci., 33,
2148-
2159, Chan-Ling, T., & Stone J. (1993). Retinopathy of prematurity: Its origins  in the
architecture of the retina. In Progress in Retinal Research. Eds. N.  Osborne & G.
Chader, 12, 155-178, Chan-Ling, T.,  Glial, neuronal & vascular  interactions in the
mammalian retina. In Progress in Retinal Research, 13, (in  press, 1994).


NAME: Dr C Chen
POSITION: NH & MRC RO
ADDRESS: Prince Henry's Institute of Medical Research, PO Box 152, CLAYTON 
VIC   3168
PHONE NO: (613) 550 4371
FAX NO: (613) 550 6125
SUBJECT AREAS
Neuroendocrine Control; Hypothalamic-Pituitary Regulation. RESEARCH INTERESTS
Receptors, ion channels and second messenger systems in the regulation of 
hormone secretion from pituitary cells.
TECHNIQUES USED
Patch-clamp recording: [Ca2+]i measurement; in vitro perifusion; cell  separation and
culture; immuno-blotting for single cell hormone secretion;  radioimmunoassay;
intracellular fusion.
KEY REFERENCES
Chen, C. et al (1989).  Journal of Physiology, 408: 493; Chen, C. et al (1989).  
Neuroendocrinology, 425: 29; Chen, C. et al (1990). Journal of Physiology  (London)
425: 29; Chen, C. et al (1990). American Journal of Physiology, 259:  C854; Chen C.,
& Wagoner, P.K. (1991). Circulation Research, 69: 447; Chen, C.,  & Clarke, I.J.
(1992). Growth Regulation, 2: 167; Chen, C., et al. (1993).  Brain Research, 604: 345;
Chen, C., et al. (1993). American Journal of  Physiology, 265: in press.


NAME: Dr S P Collin
POSITION: Research Fellow
ADDRESS: Psychology, The University of Western Australia, NEDLANDS  WA  6009.
PHONE NO: (619) 380 3233
FAX NO: (619) 380 1006.
EMAIL: Shaun at psy.uwa.edu.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Retina and visual pathways; Comparative neuroanatomy; Fish. RESEARCH
INTERESTS
Ontogeny and phylogeny of the visual system and visual pathways in aquatic 
vertebrates; Comparative morphology of the cornea; lens and retina in ray- finned
fishes.
TECHNIQUES USED
Neuronal tract tracing with HRP; cobalt-lysine and fluorescent markers;  Histology;
autoradiography; Electron microscopy; Electrophysiology and  intracellular dye
injection techniques.
KEY REFERENCES
Collin, S.P. and Pettigrew, J.D. (1988).  Retinal topography in reef teleosts  II.  Some
species with prominent horizontal streaks and high density areas.   Brain Behav. Evol.,
31:283-
295.;Collin, S.P. and Pettigrew, J.D. (1988).  Retinal ganglion cell topography  in
teleosts: A comparison between Nissl-stained material and retrograde  labelling from
the optic nerve.  J. Comp. Neurol., 276:412-422.;Collin, S.P.  (1989).  Anterograde
labelling from the optic nerve reveals multiple central  targets in the teleost, Lethrinus
chrysostomus (Perciformes).  Cell Tissue Res.  256:327-335.


NAME: Dr I R C Cooke
POSITION: Lecturer
ADDRESS: Biological Sciences, Deakin University, GEELONG  VIC  3217 PHONE
NO: (615) 227 1237
FAX NO: (615) 227 2022
SUBJECT AREAS
Development and Plasticity - neural systems.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Development of the respiratory pattern generating system in the early gestation 
mammalian fetus; Development of patterns of inhibitory innervation in  crustaceans in
vivo and in vitro.
TECHNIQUES USED
Chronic in utero recording from fetal lambs early in gestation; Conventional 
intracellular recording techniques; Immunohistochemistry.
KEY REFERENCES
Cooke, I.R.C. & Berger, P.J. (1990).  Precursor of respiratory pattern in the  early
gestation mammalian fetus.  Brain Res. 522: 333-336. 

NAME: Professor M Costa
POSITION: Professor of Neurophysiology, Human Physiology
ADDRESS: School of Medicine, Flinders University of South Australia, G P O Box 
2100, ADELAIDE  SA  5001.
PHONE NO: (618) 204 4182
FAX NO: (618) 277 0085
SUBJECT AREAS
Interaction between neurotransmitters and neuromodulation; Opiates, endorphins,  and
enkephalins: anatomy, biochemistry and physiology effects; Peptides:  localization,
biosynthesis and processing, metabolism, characterization and  physiological effects;
Mammals; Human; Neuroeffector mechanisms; Transmitters  and
neuropeptides-chemical coding; Smooth and cardiac muscle; Autonomic  ganglia.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Structure, chemistry and function of the enteric nervous system; Neuronal  control of
intestinal functions; Computer simulation of intestinal motor  behaviour.
TECHNIQUES USED
Organotypic and tissues cultures, in vitro pharmacology of intestinal  preparations,
intra and extracellular recordings of smooth muscle and neurons; 
Immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, retrograde tracing; Biochemistry and 
histochemistry of neuronal protein kinases; Computer modelling. KEY REFERENCES
Brookes, S.J.H., Song, Z-M., Steele, P.A. & Costa, M. (in press).   Identification of
motor neurones to the longitudinal muscle of the guinea-pig  ileum. 
Gastroenterology.;Waterman, S.A., Costa, M. & Tonini, M.  (in press).   Modulation of
peristalsis in the isolated guinea-pig small intestine by  exogenous and endogenous
opioids.  British Journal of Pharmacology.;Vickers,  J.C. & Costa, M. (in press).  The
neurofilament triplet is present in distinct  subpopulations of neurons in the central
nervous system of the guinea-pig.   Neuroscience.;Song, Z-M., Brookes, S.J.H.,
Steele, P.A. & Costa, M.   Projections and pathways of submucous neurons to the
mucosa of the guine-pig  small intestine.  Cell and Tissue Research.;LLewellyn-Smith,
I.J., Song, Z-M.,  Costa, M., Bredt, D.S. & Snyder, S.H.  Ultrastructural localization of
nitric  oxide synthase immunoreactivity in guinea-pig enteric neurons.  Brain 
Research.;Steele, P., Brookes, S. & Costa, M. (1991).  Immunohistochemical 
identification of cholinergic neurons in the myenteric plexus of guinea-pig  small
intestinge.  Neuroscience 45: 227-239.;Jeitner, T.M., Jarvie, P., Costa,  M., Rostas,
J.A.P. & Dunkley, P.R. (1991).  Protein phosphorylation in guinea- pig myenteric
ganglia and brain: prescence of calmodulin kinase II, protein  kinase C and cyclic AMP
kinase and characterisation of major phosphorproteins.   Neuroscience, 40:
555-569.;Brookes, S.J.H., Steele, P.A. & Costa, M. (1991).   Identification and
immunohistochemistry of cholinergic and non-cholinergic  circular muscle motor
neurones in the guinea pig small intestinge.   Neuroscience 42: 863-
878.


NAME: Dr J F Dann
POSITION: Research Fellow A.R.C.
ADDRESS: Dept of Physiology, The University of Western Australia, NEDLANDS  WA 
 6009
PHONE NO: (619) 380 3316
FAX NO: (619) 380 1025
SUBJECT AREAS
Cell birth, migration and death; Neuronal and transmitter plasticity;  Synaptogenesis,
morphogenesis; Interaction between neurotransmitters and  neuromodulation;
Auditory; Retina and visual pathways; Comparative  neuroanatomy; Amphibia;
Mammals.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Development of the visual system; Comparative neuroanatomy of the visual  system;
Morphology and neurotransmitter expression in the developing and adult  olivocochlear
system.
TECHNIQUES USED
Intracellular injection; Retrograde tracing of neuronal pathways; 
Immunocytochemistry.
KEY REFERENCES
Dann, J.F., Buhl, E.H., & Peichl, L. (1988). Postnatal dendritic maturation of  alpha
and beta ganglion cells in cat retina. The Journal of Neuroscience, 8(5),  1485-1499;
Dann, J.F. (1989). Cholinergic amacrine cells in the developing cat  retina. J. Comp.
Neurol. 289, 143-155; Dann, J.F., & Beazley, L.D. (1989).  Neurogenesis and cell
death in the isthmic nuclei of the frog Limnodynastes  dorsalis. J. Comp. Neurol. 283,
28-37. 


NAME: Professor I Darian-Smith
POSITION: Professor
ADDRESS: Laboratory, Department of Anatomy & Cell Biology, University of 
Melbourne, MELBOURNE  VIC  3052, Office, Howard Florey Institute, University of 
Melbourne, MELBOURNE  VIC  3052
PHONE NO: 61 (0) 3 344 5666
FAX NO: 61 (0) 3 349 1293
SUBJECT AREAS
Somatosensory pathways; Spinal cord and somatic afferents; Control of posture  and
movement; Cortex and cerebellum; Neuronal and transmitter plasticity; 
Synaptogenesis, morphogenesis.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Focus of current work is on the organization of the connections of the  sensorimotor
cerebral cortex of the macaque monkey.  Over the last 2 - 3 years  we have
examined: The thalamocortical projection pattern in the newborn and  mature
macaque (Darian-Smith and Darian-Smith); The corticospinal projections  to the
cervical spinal cord, again in the infant and mature animal (Galea and  Darian-Smith);
The reorganization of the corticospinal projections following  hemisection of the
cervical spinal cord, and correlation of the recovery of  manual performance with the
reorganized corticospinal and bulbospinal pathways  (Galea and Darian-Smith);
Thalamocortical and corticocortical input to the  medial surface of the parietal and
frontal (cingulate) cortex in the mature  macaque (Tippayatorn and Darian-
Smith); The input to ventral lateral and ventral posterior thalamic nuclei of  the mature
macaque (Tan and Darian-Smith).  Recently we have started a  systematic study of
the distributions of synapses on the apical dendrites of  identified corticospinal
neurons.  This involves preliminary labelling of  corticospinal cells, intracellular
injection of label into these cells in fixed  tissue slices.  EM reconstruction of the
individual apical dendrites, and  mapping onto the dendrite the sites of individual
synaptic terminals (Sugitani  and Darian-Smith).  This study is still being developed.
TECHNIQUES USED
Multiple fluorescent dye injections for retrograde labelling of cerebral and  brainstem
neurons in macaques; Intracellular injection of neuron labels in  fixed cortical slices:
Lucifer Yellow, biocytin etc., Reconstruction of  injected neurons, using light and EM
microscopy, Evaluation of manual skills  following focal spinal cord lesions in infant
and mature macaque. KEY REFERENCES
Darian-Smith, C., Darian-Smith, I. and Cheema, S.S.  (1990).  Thalamic  projections to
sensorimotor cortex in the newborn macaque.  In J. Comp.  Neurol., 299:
47-63.;Darian-
Smith, C., Darian-Smith, I. and Cheema, S.S.  (1990).  Thalamic projections to 
sensorimotor cortex in the Macaque monkey: use of multiple retrograde  fluorescent
tracers.  In J. of Comp. Neurol., 299: 17-46.;Darian-Smith, I.,  Darian-Smith, C., Galea,
M. and Pepperell, R.  Thalamocortical connections with  sensorimotor areas in the
mature and newborn Macaque monkey.  In Motor Control:  Concepts and Issues. 
Edited by D.R. Humphrey and H.J. Freund.  John Wiley and  Son; Darian-Smith, C., &
Darian-Smith, I. (1993). Thalamic projections to areas  3a, 3b, and 4 in the
sensorimotor cortex of the mature and infant macaque  monkey. J. Comp. Neurol. (in
press), Darian-Smith, C., & Darian-Smith, I.  (1993). Ipsilateral cortical projections to
area 3a, 3b, and 4 in the macaque  monkey. J. Comp. Neurol. (in press).


NAME: D.F. Davey
POSITION: Associate Professor
ADDRESS: Department of Physiology, PHONE NO: (612) 692 4559 FAX NO: (612)
692 2058
EMAIL: daved  physiol.su.oz.au
SUBJECTS
A2, B8, C16, E31
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Peripheral nerve regeneration, alternatives to nerve grafts, role of Schwann  cells;
Axon - Schwann cell interactions.
TECHNIQUES USED
Microscopy - Electron, Light, Fluorescence, Confocal; Microspectrophotometric;  Patch
clamping; Calcium
KEY REFERENCES
Annsselin, A.D., Corbeil, S.D. & Davey, D.F. (1993). Culture of Schwann cells  from
adult animals. Glia, Submitted, Ansselin, A.D., & Davey, D.F. (1988).  Axonal
regeneration through peripheral nerve grafts: The effect of proximo- distal orientation.
Microsurgery, 9: 103-113, Ansselin, A.D. & Davey, D.F.  (1993). The regeneration of
axons through normal and reversed peripheral nerve  grafts. Restorative Neurology
and Neuroscience, 5: 225-240, Ansselin, A.D.,  Pollard, J.D., & Davey, D.F. (1992).
Innunosuppression in nerve grafting: Is it  desirable?. Journal of Neurological
Sciences, 112: 160-169, Davey, D.F., &  Ansselin, A.D. (1991a).  Labelling of
restricted numbers of axons by solid  rhodamine implantation into nerve trunks.
Neuroscience Letters, 121: 83-87,  Davey, D.F. & Ansselin, A.D. (1991b) Labelling of
restricted numbers of axons  by solid rhodamine implantation into nerve trunks.
Neuroscience Letters, 121:  83-87; Nichol, K.R., Chan, N., Davey, D.F., & Bennett,
M.R. (1993).  Location  of nitric oxide synthase in the developing avian ciliary
ganglion. Journal of  Histochemistry and Cytochemistry. Submitted.


NAME: Dr B J Dennis
POSITION: Senior Lecturer
ADDRESS: Physiology, University of Adelaide, G P O Box 498, ADELAIDE  SA  5001
PHONE NO: 081 228 5329
FAX NO: 081 232 5669
SUBJECT AREAS
Structure and function of identified cells; Action potentials and ion channels;  Opiates,
endorphins, and enkephalins: anatomy, biochemistry and physiology  effects; Pain:
central pathways and modulation; Other sensory systems;  Comparative
neuroanatomy; Mammals.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Neuroanatomy & Neurophysiology: neural circuitry of pain; Olfactory system: 
centrifugal control.
TECHNIQUES USED
Antero- and retrograde tract tracing techniques; Electrophysiology;  Morphological
identification of neurones in vitro; Immunocytochemistry -  neurotransmitters.
KEY REFERENCES
Meller & Dennis, B.J. (1986).  Afferent projections of PAG - Neuroscience. 19,  927-
964.;Meller & Dennis, B.J. (1986).  Efferent projections of PAG - Neuroscience  40,
191-
216.;Meller & Dennis, B.J. (1990).  PAG - Nissl. Study, Golgi Study. J. Comp.  Neurol.
302, 66-86, 87-99., Dennis, B.J. (1976). Olfactory. Br. Res. 110, 593- 600; Dennis,
B.J. & Meller, S.T. (1993). Investigations on the periaqueductal  gray (PAG) of the
rabbit: with consideration of experimental procedures and  functional roles of the PAG.
Prog. in Neurobiol., 41, (in press); Meller, S.T.,  & Dennis, B.J. (1993). A scanning and
transmission election microscopic  analysis of the aqueduct in the rabbit. Anatomical
Record, (in press), Meller,  S.T., Dennis, B.J. (1993). A quantitative ultra structural
analysis of the  periaquductal gray in the rabbit. Anatomical Record, (in press). 

NAME: Dr P R Dodd
POSITION: NH MRC Senior Research Fellow ADDRESS: Clinical Research
Laboratory,  Royal Brisbane Hospital Foundation, Bancroft Centre, Brisbane  QLD
4029  AUSTRALIA
PHONE NO: (617) 362 0495
FAX NO: (617) 362 0108
SUBJECT AREAS
mRNA regulation; ageing; diseases of the nervous system; neuropathology; amino 
acids; transmitters and receptors in disease; human.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Mechanisms of pathogenesis of neurological disease: chronic alcoholism with 
cirrhosis, hepatic encephalopathy or the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome; Alzheimer 
and non-Alzheimer dementia. Amino acid neurotransmitters and excitotoxicity.  SIDS.
TECHNIQUES USED
Stimulus-induced release, receptor binding and activation, and high affinity  uptake,
are studied in metabolically active or membrane preparations obtained  post mortem. 
Autoradiographic and in situ techniques are used to study  distribution and gene
expression.
KEY REFERENCES
Dodd, P.R., Thomas, G.J., Harper, C.G., & Kril, J.J. (1992). Amino acid 
neurotransmitter receptor changes in cerebral cortex in alcoholism: Effects of  cirrhosis
of the liver. J. Neurochem., 59: 1506-1515, Dodd, P.R., Williams,  S.H., Gundlach,
A.L., Harper, P.A.W., Healy, P.J., Dennis, J.A., & Johnston,  G.A.R. (1992). Glutamate
and g-aminobutyric acid neurotransmitter systems in  the acute phase of Maple Syrup
Urine Disease and Citrullinaemia  encephalopathies in newborn calves. J.
Neurochem., 59: 582-590;gh, J.M., Powis,  D.A., Dodd, P.R., & Rostas, J.A.P. (1992).
NMDA receptor function in chicken  forebrain during maturation. Mol.
Neuropharmacol., 2: 193-195, Leong, D.K.,  Dodd, P.R., & Johnston, G.A.R. (1993).
Brain extracts containing a Huntington  disease antigen inhibit [3H]kainate binding and
block synaptosomal amino acid  transport. Neurochem. Internat., in press, Thomas,
G.J., & Dodd, P.R. (1993).  Transmitter amino acid neurochemistry in chronic
alcoholism with and without  cirrhosis of the liver. Drug Alcohol Rev., 12: 91-98,
Westphalen, R.I., & Dodd,  P.R. (1993). New evidence for a loss of serotonergic nerve
terminals in rats  treated with d,l-fenfluramine. Pharmacol. Toxicol., in press. 

NAME: Professor G.A. Donnan
POSITION: Professor & Director, Department of Neurology,, Austin & Repatriation 
General Hospitals,, Professor,, University of Melbourne
ADDRESS: Department of Neurology, Austin Hospital, HEIDELBERG  VIC  3084
PHONE NO: (613) 496 5529
FAX NO: (613) 457 2654
SUBJECT AREAS
Catecholamines, serotonin, histamine and other biogenic amines; Diseases of the 
nervous system; Neuropathology.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
1. Neurochemistry of movement disorders.  Autoradiographic studies of  radioligands
in post-
mortem specimens of normal brain and subjects with movement disorders are being 
studied to determine the reasons for therapeutic failure in some cases.   Dopamine
uptake sites, D1 and D2 receptors, together with receptor binding of a  range of
neuropeptides is being examined.  2. Host responses to neural  transplantation. 
Striatal responses to surgical pertibation including adrenal  implants is being studied
using autoradiographic, immunohistochemical and  biochemical technique.  3.  Clinical
and epidemiological aspects of  cerebrovascular disease.
TECHNIQUES USED
Autoradiography; immunohistochemistry; HPLC assay.
KEY REFERENCES
Donnan, G.A., Kaczmarczyk, S.J., Paxinos, G., Chilco, P.J., Woodhouse, D.G., 
Kalnins, R.M. & Mendelsohn, F.A.O. (1991). The distribution of Catecholamine  uptake
sites in human brain determined by quantitative [3H] mazindol  autoradiography. J.
Comp. Neurol. 304: 419-434, Donnan, G.A., Woodhouse, D.G.,  Kaczmarczyk, kS.J.,
Holder, J.E., Paxinos, G., Chilco, P.J., Churchyard, A.J.,  Kalnins, R.M., Fabinyi,
G.C.A., Mendelsohn, F.A.O. (1991). Evidence for  Plasticity of the Dopaminergic
System in Parkinsonism.  Molecular Neurobiol.,  5: 421Ä433, Churchyard, A., Donnan,
G.A., Kaczmarczyk, S.J., Hughes, A.H.,  Howells, D., Mendelsohn, F.A.O. Dopamine
D2 receptor loss in multiple system  atrophy. Ann. Neurol. (in press, 1993).


NAME: Dr P K Dorward
POSITION: Research Fellow (NH&MRC)
ADDRESS: Anatomy, Monash University, CLAYTON  VIC  3168
PHONE NO: 565 2763
FAX NO: 565 2766
SUBJECT AREAS Catecholamines, serotonin, histamine and other biogenic amines; 
Opiates, endorphins, and enkephalins: anatomy, biochemistry and physiology  effects;
Peptides: localization, biosynthesis and processing, metabolism,  characterization and
physiological effects; Cardiovascular regulation and  regulation of other autonomic
functions; Basal ganglia, vestibular and  oculomotor systems; Control of posture and
movement; Cortex and cerebellum;  Mammals; Primates.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Cardiovascular regulation; CNS neuro transmitters.;Control of voluntary  movement.
TECHNIQUES USED
Semi-chronic sympathetic nerve recording in conscious rabbits; Single afferent  and
synpathetic efferent fibre recording in rabbits; Single neurone recording  in behaving
monkeys.
KEY REFERENCES
Iriki, M., Dorward, P.K. & Korner, P.I. (1977).  Pflugers Archiv, 370, 1- 7.;Dorward,
P.K. & Korner, P.I. (1978).  Euro. J. Pharmacol. 52, 61- 72.;Dorward, P.K., Andresen,
M.C., Burke, S.L., Oliver, J.R. & Korner, P.I.  (1982). Circ. Res. 50, 428-439.;Dorward,
P.K., Flaim, M. & Ludbrook, J. (1983).  Aust. J. Exp Biol Med Sci. 61,
219-230.;Dorward, P.K., Riedel, w., Burke, S.L.,  Gipps, J. & Korner, P.I. (1985). Circ.
Res. 57, 1-16.;Burke, S.L., Dorward,  P.K. & Korner, P.I. (1986). J. Physiol. (Lond).
378, 391-402.;Dorward, P.K.,  Burke, S.L., Janig, W. & Cassell, J. (1987). J. auton.
Nerv. Syst. 18, 39- 54.;Dorward, P.K. & Korner, P.I. (1987).  News in Physiol. Sci. 2,
10- 13.;Burke, S.L. & Dorward, P.K. (1988).  J. Physiol. (Lond). 402, 9- 27.;Dorward,
P.K., Bell, L.B. & Rudd, C.D. (1990). Hypertension. 16, 131- 139.;Dorward, P.K. &
Rudd, C.D. (1991). Am. J. Phsiol. 260,H770-H778.;Dorward,  P.K., Saigusa, T. &
Eisenhofer, G. (1991). J. Cardiovasc. Pharmacol. 17, 519- 531.;Esler, M., Wallin, G.,
Dorward, P., Eisenhofer, G., Westerman, R.,  Meredith, I., Lambert, G., Cox, H. &
Jennings, G. (1991). Am. J. Physiol. 260,  R817-R823.


NAME: Associate Professor P R Dunkley
POSITION: Head, Discipline of Medical Biochemistry
ADDRESS: University of Newcastle, NEWCASTLE  NSW  2308
PHONE NO: (049) 21 5617
FAX NO: (049) 21 6903
EMAIL: bcprd at medicine.newcastle.edu.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Second messengers; protein phosphorylation; harmacology of synaptic  transmission;
synaptic structure and function, presynaptic and postsynaptic  mechanisms;
Neuroendocrine control: other.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
The primary interest of my laboratory is stimulus-secretion coupling and the  role of
protein kinases in this process.  The model systems used are  synaptosomes from the
CNS and cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells.  In  particular we are interested in:
the role of calmodulin-stimulated protein  kinase 11 and protein phosphatases in
neurotransmitter release from  synaptosomes; the mechanism(s) whereby histamine
causes secretion of  catecholamines and increases tyrosine hydroxylase
phosphorylation in adrenal  chromaffin cells.  Emphasis is placed on phosphoinositide
metabolism and the  role of protein kinase C, in relation to calcium handling.
TECHNIQUES USED
The major techniques are protein kinase assays, phosphoprotein  characterisation,
phosphoinositide fractionation by HPLC, calcium handling and  fura 2 assay,
catecholamine release assays, immunohistochemistry. KEY REFERENCES
Thorne, B., Sanderson, E.M., Wonnacott, S., & Dunkley, P.R. (1991). Isolation  of
hippocampal synaptosomes on Percoll gradients: Cholinergic and noradrenergic 
markers. J. Neurochem., 56: 479-484, Dunkley, P.R. (1991). Autophosphorylation  of
neuronal calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase 11. Molecular Neurobiology, 5: 
179-202: Sim, A.T.R., Dunkley, P.R., Jarvie, P.E., & Rostas, J.A.P. (1991). 
Modulation of synaptosomal protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation by calcium  is
antagonised by inhibition of protein phosphatases with okadaic acid.  Neuroscience
Letters, 126: 203-206.


NAME: Dr S A Dunlop
POSITION: Research Fellow, NH & MRC
ADDRESS: Neurobiology Laboratory, Department of Psychology, The University of 
Western Australia, NEDLANDS  WA  6009
PHONE NO: (619) 380 2643
FAX NO: (619) 380 1006
SUBJECT AREAS
Cell structure; Cell birth, migration and death; Glia; Myelin; Retina and  visual
pathways; CNS; Amphibia; Birds; Mammals.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Development and regeneration of retinal ganglion cells.  1.  Development of  neuronal
form.  The elaboration of dendrites, the growth of axons and their  growth cones along
visual pathways and formation of synapses is being studied  using light and electron
microscopic analysis of labelled neurons, 2.   Development of myelin.  The formation
of the myelin sheath and the  developmental sequences in which myelin is laid down
along the optic nerve are  being examined ultrastructurally.  The origin and migration
of neuroglial cells  is also being studied, 3.  Regeneration of the optic nerve.  The
regeneration  of retinal ganglion cell axons in the ampbibian optic nerve is being
examined  using light and electron microscopic analysis of labelled neurons.  In
addition  the cellular milieu, namely degenerating axons, glial cells and macrophages, 
through which axons regenerate, is also being examined.
TECHNIQUES USED
Light and electron microscopy (qualitative and quantitative), serial  reconstruction, in
vivo and in vitro neuronal labelling using HRP live embryo  culture, fluorescent dyes
and single cell injection, tritiatedÄthymidine  labelling.
KEY REFERENCES
Beazley, L.D., & Dunlop, S.A. (1983). The evolution of an area centralis and  visual
streak in the marsupial Setonix brachyurus. J. Comp. Neurol., 216, 211- 231; Dunlop,
S.A., & Beazley, L.D. (1987). Cell death in the retinal ganglion  cell layer of the
wallaby Setonix brachyurus during area centralis and visual  streak formation. J.
Comp. Neurol., 264: 14-23; Dunlop, S.A. (1990). Early  development of retinal
ganglion cell dendrites in the marsupial Setonix  brachyurus. J. Comp. Neurol. 293,
425-447, Dunlop, S.A., Humphrey, M.F., &  Beazley, L.D. (1992). Displaced retinal
ganglion cells in normal frogs and  those with regenerated optic nerves. Anat. &
Embryol. 185: 431-438, Humphrey,  M.F., Dunlop, S.A., Shimada, A., & Beazley, L.D.
(1992). Disconnected optic  axons persist in the visual pathway during regeneration of
the retino-tectal  projection in the frog. Exp. Brain Res. 90: 630-634; Playford, D.E., &
Dunlop,  S.A. (1993). A biphasic sequence of myelination in the optic nerve of the
frog.  J. Comp. Neurol. 331: 1-11, Dunlop, S.A., Ross, W.M., & Beazley, L.D. The 
visual system of the honey possum (Tarsipes rostratus): A quantitative analysis  of
ganglion cell topography and the organisation of the optic nerve. Brain,  Behav. &
Evol. (in press).


NAME: Dr S E Dyson
POSITION: Lecturer
ADDRESS: Anatomy & Human Biology, The University of Western Australia,
NEDLANDS   WA  6009
PHONE NO: (09) 380 3347
FAX NO: (09) 380 1051
SUBJECT AREAS
Cell Structure; Synaptogenesis, morphogenesis; Blood-brain barrier; Mechanisms  of
intracellular transport and metabolic studies; Neuropathology;  Neurotoxicology; Retina
and visual pathways; Other sensory systems; Stress,  hormones and the autonomic
nervous system; CNS; Brain metabolism; Mammals. RESEARCH INTERESTS
Carbon monoxide toxicity and the CNS; CNS plasticity; Synaptogenesis.
TECHNIQUES USED
Electron microscopy; Autoradiography; Image analysis.
KEY REFERENCES
Dyson, S.E., Warton, S.S. & Cockman, B. (1991). Volumetric & histological  changes
in the cochlear nuclei of visually deprived rats: a possible  morphological basis for
intermodal sensory compensation. J. Comp. Neurol. 307,  39-48., Harvey, A.R., Chen,
M., & Dyson, S.E. (1991). Glial cells transplanted  to the rat optic tract; influence on
the regrowth of retinal axons. Annal N.Y.  Acad. Sci., 633, 573-576, Chen, M., Harvey,
A.R., & Dyson, S.E. (1991).  Regrowth of lesloned axons associated with the
reansplntation of Schwann cells  to the Brachial region of the rat optic tract.
Restorative Neurol. &  Neuroscience, 2, 233-248, Quayle, M.M., & Dyson, S.E. (1991).
Carbon monoxide  exposure and the urban environment - a review of our current
investigations. in  Proc. of the Australas Soc Hum Biol., 5, 143-150.


NAME: Dr K M Dziegielewska
POSITION: Principal Research Fellow
ADDRESS: Physiology, University of Tasmania, Sandy Bay Campus, Churchill 
Avenue, SANDY BAY, GPO Box 252C, HOBART  TAS  7001
PHONE NO: (002) 20 2678
FAX NO: (002) 20 2679
SUBJECT AREAS
Blood-brain barrier; Mechanisms of intracellular transport and metabolic  studies;
Messenger RNA regulation, gene structure and function; Aging;  Neurotoxicology;
Brain metabolism; Mammals.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Developmental control of brain-liver specific glycopropteins; Acute phase  response in
pregnancy; effects on the fetal brain development; Effects of heavy  metal pollution on
human development.
TECHNIQUES USED
Molecular cloning and sequencing; in situ hybridization; immunoelectrophoresis; 
protein separation; monoclonal antibodies; tissue culture; whole animal  physiology.
KEY REFERENCES
Brown, W.M., Dziegielewska, K.M., Saudners, N.R., Christie, D.L., Nawratil, P.  and
Muller-
Esterl, W. (1992). The nucleotide and deduced amino acid structures of sheep  and
pig fetuin: Common structural features of the mammalian fetuin family. Eur.  J.
Biochem. 205, 321Ä331., Dziegielewska, K.M., Reader, M., Matthews, N.,  Brown,
W.M., Mollgard, K., & Saunders, N.R. (1993). Synthesis of the foetal  protein fetuin by
early developing neurons in the immature neocortex. J.  Neurocytol. 22, 266-272,
Brown, W.M., Saunders, N.R., Mollgard, K., &  Dziegielewska, K.M. (1992).  Retuin -
an old friend revisited. Bio Essays. 14,  749-755, Dziegielewska, K.M., Bell, J.E.,
Matthews, N., Mollgard, K., &  Saunders, N.R. (1993). Zn-binding globulin in human
fetal brain and liver: a  marker for passive blood/CSF transfer of protein. Neuropath.
Applied Neurobiol.  19, 82-90.


NAME: Dr A W Everett
POSITION: Lecturer
ADDRESS: Physiology, The University of Western Australia, NEDLANDS  WA  6009
PHONE NO: (619) 380 3341
FAX NO: (619) 380 1025
SUBJECT AREAS
Synaptogenesis, morphogenesis.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Molecular determinants governing synapse formation.
TECHNIQUES USED
Monoclonal antibodies; Retroviral mediated gene transfer.
KEY REFERENCES
Brown, D.R. & Everett, A.W. (1991).  J. Comp. Neurol. 309, 495-506.;Ewan,  K.B.R. &
Everett, A.W. (1992).  Exp. Cell Res. 198, 315-320. 

NAME: Dr J B Furness
POSITION: Professor
ADDRESS: Department of Physiology, University of Melbourne, MELBOURNE  VIC  
3052
PHONE NO: (613) 344 5853
FAX NO: (613) 344 7764
RESEARCH INTERESTS
The organisation of the autonomic nervous system: the relation between  structure,
function and chemistry of neurons, The production of realistic  computer models of the
nervous system that link experimentally derived  properties and connections of
individual neurons to the complex behaviours of  whole systems, The relative
physiological roles of multiple transmitters in  neurons, that is, the analysis of chemical
coding and plurichemical  transmission, Pharmacology and roles of neuropeptides;
Electrophysiology of  identified neurons.
TECHNIQUES USED
Combined electrophysiology and dye filling; Computer modelling;  Neuropharmacology;
Peptide chemistry; Immunohistochemistry; Electron  microscopy; Ligand binding.
KEY REFERENCES
Pompolo, S., & Furness, J.B. (1990). Ultrastructure and synaptology of neurons 
immunoreactive for gamma-aminobutyric acid in the myenteric plexus of the 
guinea-pig small intestine. J. Neurocytolo., 19: 539-549; Bornstein, J.C.,  Furness,
J.B., Smith, T.K., & Trussell, D.C. (1991). Synaptic responses evoked  in
morphologically characterized myenteric neurons by mechanical stimulation of  the
mucosa of the guinea-pig ileum. J. Neurosci. 11:505-518; Smith, T.K.,  Bornstein, J.C.,
& Furness, J.B. (1991). Interactions between reflexes evoked  by distension and
mucosal stimulation: Electrophysiological studies of guinea- pig ileum. J. Autonom.
Nerv. System, 34: 69-76.


NAME: Dr S C Gandevia
POSITION: NH & MRC Principal Research Fellow/, Clinical Neurophysiologist
ADDRESS: Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Prince of Wales Medical 
Research Institute, High Street, RANDWICK  NSW  2031
PHONE NO: (612) 399 2670
FAX NO: (612) 399 1119
EMAIL: S. Gandevia at unsw.edu.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Cardiovascular regulation and regulation of other autonomic functions;  Respiratory
regulation, Spinal cord and somatic afferents, Control of posture  and movement;
Cortex and certebellum; Muscle and disorders of motor systems;  Spinal cord and
brain stem.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Kinaesthetic mechanisms, particularly sensations of joint movement and muscle  force,
Control of the human fusimotor system assessed using microneurography,  Properties
of human joint and muscle receptors, Central and peripheral fatigue  mechanisms in
human muscles during exercise, Strength, endurance and cortical  control of human
respiratory muscles.
TECHNIQUES USED
A range of psychophysical procedures; Electrophysiological procedures including 
electromyography and microneurography.
KEY REFERENCES
McKenzie, D.K., Bigland-Ritchie, B., Gorman, R.B., & Gandevia, S.C. (1992).  Central
and peripheral fatigue of human diaphragm and limb muscles assessed by  twitch
interpolation. Journal of Physiology. 454: 643-656, Wallin, B.G., Burke,  D., &
Gandevia, S.C. (1992). Coherence between the sympathetic drives to  relaxed and
contracting muscles of different limbs of human subjects. Journal  of Physiology. 455:
219-231, Gandevia, S.C., Gorman, R.B., McKenzie, kD.K., &  Southon, F.C.G. (1992).l
Dynamic changes in human diaphragm length: maximal  inspiratory and explusive
efforts studied with sequential radiography. Journal  of Physiology. 457: 167-176,
Fitzpatrick, R.C., Gorman, R.B., Burke, D., &  Gandevia, S.C. (1992). Postural
proprioceptive reflexes in standing human  subjects: Bandwidth of response and
transmission characteristics. Journal of  Physiology. 458: 49-83, Gandevia, S.C., &
Burke, D. (1992).  Does the nervous  system depend on kinesthetic information to
control natural limb movements.  Behavioral Brain Sciences. 15: 614-632, Gandevia,
S.C., & Burke, D. (1992).  Afferent feedback, central programming and motor
commands. Behavioral Brain  Sciences. 15: 815-819.


NAME: Professor G M Geffen
POSITION: Professor of Neuropsychology, Director, Cognitive Psychophysiology 
Laboratory
ADDRESS: Edith Cavell Building, The Medical School, Herston Rd, HERSTON, 4006
PHONE NO: (617) 07  365 5562
FAX NO: (617) 0 7 365-5564
EMAIL: Geffen at psych.psy.uq.oz.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Corpus callosum functions; selective attention mechanisms; neurodegenerative 
disorders; closed head injury.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Event related potentials; Psychophysical methods (threshold measurement);  Accuracy
& Speed of Motor responses (Behavioural); standard psychometric  assessment.
KEY REFERENCES
Geffen, G.M. et al (1990).  The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 4, 45-63.; 
Neuropsychologia, 28, 151-159.;Geffen, G.M., Encel, J.S. & Forrester, G.M.  (1991).
Neuroreport, 2, 105-
108.;Balfour, C., Clark, C.R. & Geffen, G.M. (1991).  Neuropsychologia, 29,  889-
905.;Cremona-Heteyard, S.L., Clark, C.R., Wright, M.J. & Geffen, G.M. (1992).  
Neuropsychologia, 30(2), 123-132, Clark, L.R., O'Hanlan, A., Wright, M.J., &  Geffen,
G.M. (1992). Brain Injury. 6, 509-520.


NAME: Professor L B Geffen
POSITION: Dean of Medicine, Professor of Psychiatry
ADDRESS: Cognitive Psychophysiology Laboratory, Medical School, Herston Road, 
HERSTON, QLD 4006
PHONE NO: (07) 365 5316
FAX NO: (07) 365 5433
SUBJECT AREAS
Human psychophysiology
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Role of monoamines in selective attention mechanisms.
Electrophysiological correlates of intelligence
KEY REFERENCES
Geffen, L.B., et al. (1989). Topographic imaging of event related potential in  human
brain. In: Visualization of Brain Functions. D. Ottosen, W. Rostene  (Eds.). MacMillan
Press, Basingstoke 197-206, Gai, W.P., et al. (1993). Loss of  C1 and C2 adrenalin
synthsizing neurons in the medulla in Parkinson's disease.  In: Annals of Neurology,
33, 356-367.


NAME: Dr S Ghosh
POSITION: Lecturer
ADDRESS: Physiology & Pharmacology, University of Queensland, ST LUCIA  QLD  
4071
PHONE NO: (07) 365 3121
FAX NO: (07) 365 1766
EMAIL:
SUBJECT AREAS
Motor areas of the cerebral cortex.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Cerebral control of movement; Function of corticocortical & intracortical  connections
of the sensory-motor cortex.
TECHNIQUES USED
Anterograde & retrogradely transported tracers to study cortical connections; 
Electrophysiological (intra & extracellular) study of cortical neurons. KEY
REFERENCES
Ghosh, S., Brinkman, C. & Porter, R. (1987).  A quantitative study of the  distribution
of neurons projecting to the precentral motor cortex in the monkey  (M. fascicularis). J.
Comp. Neurol.  259: 424-444.;Ghosh, S., Fyffe, R.E.W. &  Porter, R. (1988). 
Morphology of neurons in area 4 of the cat's cortex studied  with intracellular injection
of HRP. J. Comp. Neurol,  269: 290-312.;Ghosh, S.  & Porter, R. (1988).  Morphology
of pyramidal neurones in the monkey motor  cortex and the synaptic actions of their
intracortical axon collaterals.  J.  Physiol,  400: 593-615.;Ghosh, S. & Porter, R.
(1988). Corticocortical synaptic  influences on morphologically identified pyramidal
neurons in the motor cortex  of the monkey.  J. Physiol.  400: 617-629, Porter, R.,
Ghosh, S., Smith, T.G.,  & Lange G.D. (1991). A fractal analysis of pyramidal neurons
in mammalian motor  cortex. Neurosci. Lett. 130: 112-116, Ghosh, S., Turman, A.B.,
Vickery, R.M., &  Rowe, M.J. (1993). Responses of cat ventroposterdateral thalamic
neurons to  vibrotactile stimulation of the forelimb footpads. Exp. Brain Res. (in press). 

NAME: Ian L Gibbins
POSITION: Professor and Head of Department
ADDRESS: Department of Anatomy & Histology, School of Medicine, Flinders 
University of South Australia, GPO Box 2100, ADELAIDE  SA  5001 PHONE NO: (08)
204 5271
FAX NO: (08) 277 0085
SUBJECT AREAS
Neuronal and transmitter plasticity; Synaptic structure and function,  presynaptic and
postsynaptic mechanisms; Peptides; Cardiovascular regulation  and other autonomic
functions; Sensory systems; Comparative neuroanatomy; L62,  63, 64, 65, 66; M69,
70, 71, 72, 73.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Structure and function of neurons in autonomic pathways to specific target  organs. 
The circuitry of autonomic nerve pathways.  Ganglionic transmission,  particularly the
roles of neuropeptides.
TECHNIQUES USED
Multiple-labelling immunohistochemistry, Ultrastructural immunocytochemistry, 
Electrophysiology, Neuronal pathway tracing.
KEY REFERENCES
Gibbins, I.L. (1992). Vasoconstrictor, vasoldilator and pilomotor pathways in 
sysmpathetic ganglia of guinea-pigs. Neuroscience, 47: 657-672, Gibbins, I.L.  (1992).
The final common sympathetic pathways. In: Pathophysiological  Mechanisms of
Reflex Sympathetic Distrophy (W. Janig and R Schmidt eds), Verlag  Chemie/VCH,
Weinheim, 177-196, Morrie, J.L., & Gibbins, I.L. (1992)  Contransmission and
neuromodulation. In: Autonomic Neuroeffector Mechanisms,  Volume 1 in the
"Autonomic Nervous System" series (G Burnstock and CHV Hoyle  eds), Harwood
Academic Publishers, Chur, 33-119.


NAME: Professor D J Glencross
POSITION: Head of School
ADDRESS: School of Psychology, Curtin University of Technology, Box U1987, G P 
O Box , PERTH  WA  6001
PHONE NO: (09) 351 7867
FAX NO: (09) 351-2464
SUBJECT AREAS
Control of posture and movement.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Motor programming and motor control; Bimanual control of sequential movements; 
Peripheral and central feedback mechanisms underlying the detection of movement 
errors.
TECHNIQUES USED
Sequential tapping task; Step tracking paradigm; 3-D Motion analysis;  Chronometric
techniques; EMG and evoked potential.
KEY REFERENCES
Glencross, D.J. & Barrett, N.C. (1992).  The processing of visual feedback in  rapid
movements: Revisited.  In J.J. Summers (Ed.).  Approaches to the study of  motor
control and learning.  (pp. 289-311).  Amsterdam: North Holland., Lepine,  D.,
Glencross, D. & Requin, J. (1989).  Some experimental evidence for each  against a
parametric conception movement programming.  Journal of Experimental  Psychology,
Human Perception and Performance, 15, 2, 347-362, Piek, J.P.,  Glencross, D.J.,
Barrett, N.C., & Love, G.L. (1993). The effect of temporal and  force changes on the
patterning of sequential movements. Psychological Research  / Psychologische
Forschung, 55.


NAME: Dr P J Goadsby
POSITION: Wellcome Senior Research Fellow
ADDRESS: Department of Neurology, The Prince Henry Hospital, LITTLE BAY  NSW  
2036
PHONE NO: (612) 694 5128
FAX NO: (612) 311 3483
EMAIL:SUBJECT AREAS
Neural control of the cerebral circulation & Pathophysiology of migraine. RESEARCH
INTERESTS
The primary interest of the group is in understanding the pathophysiology of  migraine. 
To this end animal models of vascular pain in the anaesthetised cat  have been
developed.  The current projects are: Examining the control of the  cerebral circulation
from the brainstem.  The nucleus locus coeruleus and raphe  dorsalis are of particular
interest because both systems not only interact with  the cerebral circulation but also
have a role in pain control, We are currently  using the 2-deoxyglucose technique to
map the areas of the brain that are  active during stimulation of a pain-sensitive
structure and comparing this to  non-vascular painful stimulation.  Pain is defined in its
neurophysiological  context as C-fibre activation rather than its behavioural context as
the  animals are anaesthetised, We are interested in the trigeminovascular system 
and its interaction with the cerebral circulation and are studying these areas  with
electrophysiological methods.  Our particular interest is in the  neuropeptides that are
released from trigeminal activation (substance P, CGRP  and neurokinin A) and their
relative contribution to the changes seen. TECHNIQUES USED
2-Deoxyglucose and iodoantipyrine autoradiography for cerebral glucose  utilization
and cerebral blood flow, respectively, Laser Doppler flowmetry for  continuous
measurements of cerebral blood flow, Receptor autoradiography to  examine localised
drug binding; electrophysiology.
KEY REFERENCES
Goadsby, P.J. (1991). Characteristics of facial nerve elicited cerebral  vasodilation
determined with laser Doppler flowmetry. Am. J. Physiol. 260:  R225-R262, Goadsby,
P.J. & Edvinsson, L. (1991) (in press). Sumatriptan  reverses the changes in calcitonin
gene-related peptide seen in the headache  phase of migraine. Cephalalgia, Goadsby,
P.J. & Gundlach, A.L. (1991).  Localization of [3H]-dihydroergotamine binding sites in
the cat central nervous  system: relevance to migraine. Ann Neurol 29: 91-94,
Goadsby, P.J., Kaube, H.,  & Hoskin, K. (1992). Nitric oxide synthesis couples
cerebral blood flow  metabolism. Brain Res, 595: 167-
170, Goadsby, P.J., & Edvinsson, L. (1993). The trigeminovascular system and 
migraine: Studies characterising cerebrovascular and neuropeptide changes seen  in
man and cat. Ann Neurol. 33: 48-56, Goadsby, P.J., & Edvinsson, L. (1993). 
Examination of the involvement of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in cerebral  autoregulation
using the movel NPY antagonist PP56. Neuropeptides. 24: 27-33,  Goadsby, P.J.,
Seylaz, J., & Mraovitch, S. (1993) (in press). Cerebrovascular  effects elicited by
electrical stimulation of centromedian-parafasicular  complex do not involve either
cholinergic or adrenergic mechanisms. Am J  Physiol., Kaube, H., Hoskin, K.L., &
Goadsby, P.J. (1993) (in press).  Sumatriptan inhibits central trigeminal neurons only
after blood-brain barrier  disruption. Br J. Pharmacol, Uddman, R., Goddsby, P.J.,
Jansen, I., &  Edvinsson, L. (1993). L. PACAP, a VIP-like peptide,
ummunohistochemical  localization and effect upon cat pial arteries and cerebral blood
flow. J.  Cereb. Blood Flow Metabol., 13: 291-297.


NAME: Dr A L  Gundlach
POSITION: Senior Research Fellow (NH & MRC Aust)
ADDRESS: Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics Unit, University of Melbourne, 
Austin Hospital, HEIDELBERG  VIC  3084
PHONE NO: (613) 496 5495
FAX NO: (613) 459 3510
EMAIL: agund at pet1. austin.unimelb.edu.au.SUBJECT AREAS
Messenger RNA regulation, gene structure and function; Amino acids; 
Catecholamines, serotonin, histamine and other biogenic amines; Interaction  between
neurotransmitters and neuromodulation; Peptides: localization,  biosynthesis and
processing, metabolism, characterization and physiological  effects; Transmitter
receptors; Transmitters and receptors in disease;  Cardiovascular regulation and
regulation of other autonomic functions; Feeding  and drinking; Stress, hormones and
the autonomic nervous system; Comparative  neuroanatomy; Mammals.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Our research is aimed at increasing the understanding of the role of  neuropeptides in
the central nervous system and their interactions with the  classical transmitters. 
Using an integrated, multidisciplinary approach we are  currently examining the role of
neuropeptide-
containing neurones (enkephalin, neuropeptide Y, galanin, substance P and 
neurotensin) in central cardiovascular pathways in the medulla oblongata.   Recent
studies have identified cells activated in the nucleus tractus  solitarius and other
medullary areas by stimulation of the aortic depressor and  carotid sinus nerves by
mapping the expression of the proto-oncogenes, c-fos  and NGF1-A (Rutherfurd et al.,
(1992).  Ongoing studies are aimed at  identifying the neuropeptide content of these
activated neurones, as an  indication of their possible involvement in cardiovascular
control, and then  examining the regulation of the relevant neuropeptide system under
different  experimental conditions (Gundlach & Knobe, 1992).  We are also studying
the  effect of alterations in nutritional status and drug treatment on hypothalamic 
neuropeptide systems (particularly neuropeptide Y).  Recent investigations have 
revealed a large decrease in cholecystokinin receptors in response to food  deprivation
(O'Shea & Gundlach, 1993).  Effects of amygdaloid kindling (an  animal model of
epilepsy) on neurotransmitter/neuropeptide gene expression and  receptor binding
characteristics of novel antihypertensive drugs are also being  investigated.
TECHNIQUES USED
Techniques employed are in situ hybridization histochemistry,  immunocytochemistry
and receptor binding and autoradiography, in combination  with procedures designed
to alter autonomic and other neuronal systems, such as  drug treatment, electric
stimulation, surgical and excitotoxic lesioning, etc.   All studies are carried out in
laboratory rats.  Results are analysed using  computer-assisted densitometry (MCID).
KEY REFERENCES
Rutherfurd, S.D., Widdop, R.E., Sannajust, F., Louis, W.J., & Gundlack, A.L.  (1992). 
Expression of c-fos and NGFI-A messenger RNA in the medulla oblongata  of the
anaesthetized rat followed stimulation of vagal and cardiovascular  afferents. Mol.
Brain Res. 13: 301-312, Gundlach, A.L., & Knobe, K.E. (1992).  Distribution of
preproatrial natriuretic peptide mRNA in rat brain detected by  in situ hybridization of
DNA obligonucleotides: enrichment in hypothalamic and  limbic regions. J.
Neurochem. 59: 758-761, O'Shea, R.D., & Gundlach, A.L.  (1993). Regulation of
cholecystokinin receptors in the hypothalamus of the rat:  reciprocal changes in
magnocellular nuclei induced by food deprivation and  dehydration. J.
Neuroendocrinol. (in press).


NAME: Dr G M Halliday
POSITION: Research Fellow
ADDRESS: Department of Pathology, University of Sydney, SYDNEY  NSW  2006
PHONE NO: (612) 692 2414
FAX NO: (612) 692 3429
SUBJECT AREAS
Aging; Diseases of the nervous system; Neuropathology; Acetylcholine; Amino  acids;
Catecholamines, serotonin, histamine and other biogenic amines; Opiates, 
endorphins, and enkephalins: anatomy, biochemistry and physiology effects; 
Peptides: localization, biosynthesis and processing, metabolism,  characterization and
physiological effects; Transmitters and receptors in  disease; Cardiovascular regulation
and regulation of other autonomic functions;  Respiratory regulation; Basal ganglia,
vestibular and oculomotor systems;  Cortex and cerebellum; Learning and memory;
Comparative neuroanatomy; Mammals;  Primates; Human.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Is there a common brain region damaged in all patients suffering from memory  loss? 
Using comparative clinicopathological correlations, the documentation of  brain lesions
in patients with memory loss may reveal brain areas crucial for  certain types of
memory.  In addition, such documentation may provide evidence  for other clinical
correlations as well as possible pathogenic mechanisms,  Which neurons in the
medulla oblongata are involved in the regulation of  cardiovascular and respiratory
control and can these neurons be identified in  humans with or without clinical
evidence of respiratory distress and/or  cardiovascular disease?  Using combined
physiological identification of animal  responses and anatomical identification of
neuronal and transmitter circuits,  medullary neurons involved in cardiovascular and
respiratory control will be  identified.  Their position and distinguishing features will be
carefully  reconstructed in three dimensions using computer-assisted morphometry. 
Similar  anatomical recognition and reconstructions in human medulla may reveal the 
location of similar neurons and the effects of chronic cardiovascular disease  and/or
respiratory distress, Do patients with Parkinson's disease have movement 
disturbances correlated to the regional degeneration of dopaminergic neurons,  or are
movement symptoms unrelated to particular regional fallout?  The  midbrain, basal
ganglia, and motor and supplementary motor cortex in clinically  followed de nova
Parkinsonian patients will be analysed to locate regional loss  of dopaminergic
markers using immunohistochemistry.  Regional loss will be  correlated to the patients'
symptoms and comparative clinicopathological  correlation will identify trends; Is
damage to the cerebellum common in  patients with movement disturbances? 
Comparative clinicopathological  correlations will be used to document cerebellar
lesions in patients with  movement disturbances.
TECHNIQUES USED
Histopathology; Immunohistochemistry; Quantitation; Morphometry; Three- dimensional
reconstructions; Enzyme histochemistry; Retorgrade and anterograde  tracing
techniques.
KEY REFERENCES
Halliday, G.M., & McLachlan, E.M. (1991). Four groups of tyrosine hydroxylase-
immunoreactive neurons in the ventrolateral medulla of rats, guinea pigs and  cats
identified on the basis of chemistry, topography and morphology.  Neuroscience. 43:
551-568, Halliday, G.M., McCann, H.L., Cotton, R.G.H.,  Creasey, H., McCusker, E.M.,
Broe, G.A., & Harper, C.G. (1992). Brainstem  serotonin-synthesizing neurons in
patients with Alzheimer's disease. Acta  Neuropathol. 84: 638-650, Halliday, G., Ellis,
J., & Harper, C. (1992). The  locus coeruleus and memory: a study of chronic
alcoholics with and without the  memory impairment of Korsakoff's psychosis. Brain
Res. 598: 33-37, Halliday,  G.M., Cullen, K., & Cairns, M.J. (1993). Quantitation and
three dimensional  reconstruction of the Ch4 nucleus in the human basal forebrain.
Synapse. (in  press).


NAME: Dr J F Hallpike
POSITION: Visiting Neurologist , & Clinical Associate Professor ADDRESS:
Department of Neurology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace,  ADELAIDE  SA 
5000
PHONE NO: (618) 223 0230  ext. 5289
FAX NO: (618) 223 4761
SUBJECT AREAS
Myelin; Blood-brain barrier; Glia; (demyelinating diseases & multiple  sclerosis).
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Clinical studies of multiple sclerosis: epidemiology, prospective surveys and  therapy;
Neuropathology of demyelination, of MS and related diseases; Blood- brain-barrier
(BBB) effects in MS and their evaluation by experimental studies. TECHNIQUES
USED
Immunoperoxidase and silver-enhancement (LM), immunogold, BBB- disruption 
(hyperosmolar sugars) and experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE)  pathology.


NAME: Dr A M Harman
POSITION: Research Fellow
ADDRESS: Dept of Psychology, The University of Western Australia, NEDLANDS  WA 
 6009
PHONE NO: (619) 380 3256
FAX NO: (619) 380 1006
SUBJECT AREAS
Cell structure; Cell birth, migration and death; Neuronal and transmitter  plasticity;
Synaptogenesis,morphogenesis; Comparative neuroanatomy; Mammals;  Human.
RESEARCH INTEREST
Cell generation; Cell death; Chiasm formation and structure; Development of  visual
cortex; Retinal development; Development of retinal pigment epithelium.
TECHNIQUES USED
Tritiated thymidine/autoradiography; HRP; DiI labelling of cells and pathways;  Cell
counting and mapping; Immunohistochemistry.
KEY REFERENCES
Harman, A.M., & Beazley, L.D. (1989). Generation of retinal cells in the  wallaby,
Setonix brachyurus. Neuroscience, 28, 219-232; Harman, A.M., Snell,  L.L., &
Beazley, L.D. (1989). Cell death in the inner and outer nuclear layers  in the wallaby,
Setonix brachyurus (quokka). Journal of Comparative Neurology,  289, 1-10; Harman,
A.M. (1991). Cell birth and death in the primary visual  system of the wallaby, Setonix
brachyurus (quokka). Journal of Comparative  Neurology, 313, 463-478; Harman,
A.M., & Jeffery, G. (1992). The distinctive  pattern of organisation in the retinofugal
pathway of a marsupial: I. retina  and optic nerve. Journal of Comparative Neurology,
325: 47-56; Jeffery, G.,  Harman, A.M. (1992)). The distinctive pattern of organisation
in the  retinofugal pathway of a marsupial: II. optic chiasm. Journal of Comparative 
Neurology, 325: 57-67; Harman, A.M., Sanderson, K.J., & Beazley, L.D. (1992). 
Biphasic retinal neurogenesis in the brush-tailed possum - further evidence of  the
mechanisms involved in the formation of ganglion cell density gradients.  Journal of
Comparative Neurology, 325: 595-606.


NAME: Professor C G Harper
POSITION: Head, Department of Pathology, Professor of Neuropathology ADDRESS:
Department of Pathology, University of Sydney, Blackburn Building,  D06, SYDNEY 
NSW  2006
PHONE NO: (612) 692 2414
FAX NO: (612) 692 3429
SUBJECT AREAS
Aging, Diseases of the nervous system; Neuropathology; Neurotoxicology.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Neuropathology of alcohol related brain damage including Wernicke-Korsakoff 
syndrome, Neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease, Neuropathology of Sudden  Infant
Death syndrome, Neuropathology of Motor Neurone disease. TECHNIQUES USED
Include traditional human neuropathology studies (good access to wide range of 
material) quantitative morphometry (image analysis) immunohistochemistry, and  EM
(in an animal model).
KEY REFERENCES
Harper, C.G., (1988). Brain damage and alcohol abuse: Where do we go from here? 
Brit. J. Addiction 83: 613-165, Harper, C., Gold, J., Rodriguez, M., Perdices,  M.
(1989). The prevalence of the Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome in Sydney,  Australia: A
prospective necropsy study. J. Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 52:  282-285, Harper, C.,
Kril, J. (1989). Patterns of neuronal loss in the cerebral  cortex of chronic alcoholic
patients. J. Neurol. Sci. 92: 81-89, Harper, C.G.,  Kril, J.J. (1991). If you drink your
brain will shrink.  Neuropathological  considerations. Alcohol & Alcoholism. 51:
375-380.


NAME: Dr A R Harvey
POSITION: Senior Lecturer
ADDRESS: Anatomy & Human Biology, The University of Western Australia,
NEDLANDS   WA  6009
PHONE NO: (619) 380 3294
FAX NO: (619) 380 1051
EMAIL:
SUBJECT AREAS
Glia; Retina and visual pathways; CNS; Implants, neurotrophic etc; PNS;  Transplants;
Cell birth, migration and death; Mammals.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Development and regeneration of axons in the rat visual system; Lesion-induced  cell
death of retinal ganglion cells in young rats.
TECHNIQUES USED
Antergrade/retrograde neuroanatomical pathway tracing; Immunohistochemistry. In 
situ hybridization; Tissue Culture - isolation of purified glial cell  populations for
implantation; Fetal cell transplantation; Implantation of  biocompatible
substrates/polymers.
KEY REFERENCES
Harvey, A.R. & Gan & Pauken, (1987).  Fetal tectal or cortical tissue  transplanted into
brachial lesion cavities in rats: Influence on the regrowth  of host retinal axons.  J.
Comp Neurol.  263: 126-136.;Dyson, Harvey, A.R.,  Trapp, & Heath, (1988). 
Ultrastructural and immunohistochemical analysis of  axonal regrowth and myelination
in membranes which form over lesion sites in  the rat visual system. J. Neurocytol. 17:
797-808, Chen, Harvey, A.R. & Dyson  (1991).  Regrowth of lesioned retinal axons
associated with transplantation of  Schwann cells to the brachial region of the rat optic
tract.  Restor. Neurol.  Neurosci.  2: 233Ä248, Harvey, A.R. et al (1992).  Survival and
migration of  transplanted male glia in adult female mouse brains monitored by a
Y-chromosome  specific probe.  Mol Brain Res.  12: 339-343, Harvey, A.R., & Tan
(1992).  Spontaneous regeneration of retinal ganglion cell axons in adult rats. 
Neuroreport. 3: 239-242; Harvey, A.R., & Robertson (1992). The time- course and
extent of retinal ganglion cell death following ablation of the  superior colliculus in
neonatal rats. J. Comp. Neurol. 325: 83-94. 

NAME: Dr G A Head
POSITION: Senior Research Fellow
ADDRESS: Neuropharmacology Laboratory, Baker Medical Research Institute, 
Commercial Road, PRAHRAN  VIC AUSTRALIA  3181
PHONE NO: (613) 522 4333
FAX NO: (613) 521 1362
SUBJECT AREAS
Cardiovascular regulation and regulation of other autonomic functions. RESEARCH
INTERESTS
Our research program focuses on CNS monoamine and peptide neurotransmitter 
pathways involved in the control of the cardiovascular system under normal  situations
and how this may be altered by conditions such as hypertension.   Current areas of
interest include: CNS monoamine neurotransmitters  noradrenaline and serotonin;
Role of the CNS renin-
angiotensin system in cardiovascular regulation; Sites and mechanism of action  of
central antihypertensive agents such as clonidine and alpha-methyldopa, role  of
imidazoline receptors, Investigation of the causes of hypertension-induced  changes to
circulatory control mechanisms, Techniques for investigation of  baroreceptor reflexes
in conscious animals.
TECHNIQUES USED
Techniques include pharmacological, surgical and electrical manipulation of  specific
brain cell groups, pathways and nuclei, techniques for assessment of  cardiovascular
variables in conscious rabbits and rats (blood pressure, blood  flow, sympathetic nerve
activity) and function (baroreflex tests, power  spectral analysis).  The laboratories are
fully computerized for data  acquisition and analysis.
KEY REFERENCES
Head, G.A., Williams, N.S. (1992). Hemodynamic effects of central angiotensin  I, II
and II in conscious rabbits. Am. J. Physiol. 263: R845-R851, Head, G.A.  (1992).
Central monoamine neurons and cardiovascular control Kidney Int.  41(37): S8-S13,
Head, G.A., Adam, M.A. (1992). Characterisation of the  baroreceptor heart rate reflex
deficit in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Clin  Exp Pharmacol Physiol. 19: 587-597.


NAME: Dr J Heath
POSITION: ADDRESS: The Neuroscience Group, Faculty of Medicine (MSB Room
508),  University of Newcastle, CALLAGHAN  NSW  2308
PHONE NO: (049) 21 5620
FAX NO: (049) 21 6903
SUBJECT AREAS
Cell structure, Glia Myelin; Disease of nervous system; PNS CNS. TECHNIQUES
USED
Light and electron microscopy.  Confocal microscopy.
KEY REFERENCES
Heath, J.W., Inuzuka, T., Quarles, R.H. and Trapp, B.D. (1991).  Distribution  of Po
protein and the myelin-associated glycoprotein in periopheral nerves from  Trembler
mice.  Journal of Neurocytology, 20, 439-449.;Kidd, G.J. and Heath,  J.W. (1991). 
Myelin sheath survival following axonal degeneration in doubly  myelinated nerve
fibers.  The Journal of Neuroscience, 11(12): 4003-4014.;Kidd,  G.J. and Heath, J.W. 
(1988).  Double myelination of axons in the sympathetic  nervous system of the
mouse.  I.  Ultrastructural features and distribution.   Journal of Neurocytology, 17,
245-261.;Kidd, G.J. and Heath, J.W. (1988).   Double myelination of axons in the
sympathetic nervous system of the mouse. II.  Mechanisms of formation.  Journal of
Neurocytology, 17, 263-276. 

NAME: Dr Caryl E. Hill
POSITION: Fellow
ADDRESS: Division of Neuroscience, John Curtin School of Medical Research, GPO 
Box 334, CANBERRA  ACT  2601
PHONE NO: (06) 249 2996
FAX NO: (06) 249 2687
SUBJECT AREAS
A5, B11, D20, 21, E25, 30, 31, F33, L66, M69, 71 RESEARCH INTERSTES
Sympathetic nerve-effector synapses; Identification of synaptic receptors; 
Determination of second messenger pathways activated and factors involved in  the
initial expression and subsequent regulation of neurotransmitter receptor  expression
during development and in the adult animal.
TECHNIQUES USED
Physiology; Pharmacology; Molecular biology e.g., northern blots, PCR, in situ 
hybridisation.
KEY REFERENCES
Hill, C.E., Jones, R.S.G., Hirst, G.D.S. & Edwards, F.R. (1991). Development of  the
functional innervation of the iris dilator muscle by sympathetic fibres in  the rat. J. Aut.
Nerv. Syst., 32: 21-29, Hill, C.E., & Vidovic, M. (1992).  Connectivity in the
sympathetic nervous system and its establihsment during  development. In:
"Development, Regeneration and Plasticity of the Autonomic  Nervous System". 
Harwood Academic Publisher gmbh., Hill, C.E., Powis, D.A., &  Hendry, I.A. (1993).
Involvement of pertussis toxin sensitive and insensitive  mechanisms in
a-adrenoceptor modulation of noradrenaline release from rat  sympathetic neurones in
tissue culture. Brit. J. Pharmacol. (in press), Hill,  C.E., Klemm, M., Edwards, F.R., &
Hirst, G.D.S. (1993). Sympathetic  transmission to the dilator muscle of the rat iris. J.
Aut. Nerv Sys.  (in press); Vidovic, M., Cohen, D., & Hill, C.E. Identification of alpha-2 
adrenergic receptor gene expression in sympathetic neurones using polymerase  chain
reaction and in situ hybridization. Mol. Brain Res. (in press). 

NAME: Dr M F Humphrey
POSITION: Director, Western Australian Retinitis, Pigmentosa Research Centre
ADDRESS: Lions Eye Institute, 2nd Floor, 2 Verdun St, NEDLANDS  WA  6009
PHONE NO: (619) 389 2144
FAX NO: (619) 382 1171
EMAIL: Martinh at uniwa.uwa.edu.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Inherited retinal degeneration, retinal anatomy, responses of retinal glia to  injury, role
of growth factors and cytokines in retinal development and  degeneration, therapeutic
use of laser irradiation in the retina. RESEARCH INTERESTS
Factors important for normal function and survival of photo receptors, Using  the retina
as a model for CNS responses to injury and the possibility of  improving repair.
TECHNIQUES USED
Laser lesions, intraocular injection, frozen section and retinal wholemount 
immunocytochemistry, electromicroscopy, tissue culture, autoradiography. KEY
REFERENCES
Humphrey et al (1992). Disconnected optic axons persist in the visual pathway  during
regeneration of the retino-tectal projection in the frog. Exp. Bran Res.  90: 630-634,
Rakoczy et al. (1993). Expression of bFGF and its receptor in the  retina of RCS rats:
A comparative study. Invest. Ophthal Vis Sic. 34: 1845- 1852, Humphrey et al. (1993).
Transient preservation of photo receptors on the  flanks of argon laser lesions inthe
RCS rat. Curr. Eye Res. 12: 367-372,  Humprhey et al. (1993). A quantitative study of
the lateral spread of Miller  cell responses to retinal lesions in the rabbit. J. Comp
Neurol., In press, Chu  et al. (1993). Horizontal cells of the normal and dystrophic rat
retina: A  wholemount study using immunolabelling for the 28kDa calcium-binding
protein.  Exp. Eye Res. In press.


NAME: Dr G E Hunt
POSITION: Senior Research Assistant
ADDRESS: Psychiatry, University of Sydney, SYDNEY  NSW  2006 PHONE NO:
(612) 736 6829
FAX NO: (612) 736 7078
SUBJECT AREAS
Catecholamines, serotonin, histamine and other biogenic amines; Transmitters  and
receptors in disease; Neuroendocrine control: pituitary; Feeding and  drinking;
Motivation, emotion and behaviour; Mammals; Human. RESEARCH INTERESTS
Psychopharmacology; dopamine; reward self stimulation; Affective disorders; 
Dexamethasone Suppression Test.
TECHNIQUES USED
Intra-cranial electrode implantation; Histology; Operant behaviour. KEY REFERENCES
Hunt, G.E., Atrens, D.M., Chesher, G.B. & Becker, F.T. (1976).  Alpha- Noradrenergic
modulation of hypothalamic self-stimulation: Studies employing  clonidine,
I-phenylphrine and alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine.  European Journal of  Pharmacology, 37,
105-111; Hunt, G.E., O'Sullivan, B.T., Johnson, G.F.S. &  Smythe, G.A. (1986). 
Growth hormone and cortisol secretion after oral  clonidine in health adults. 
Psychoneuroendocrinology, 11, 317-325; Hunt, G.E.,  Johnson, G.F.S. & Caterson,
I.D. (1989).  The effect of age on cortisol and  plasma dexamethasone concentrations
in depressed patients and controls.   Journal of Affective Disorders, 17, 21-32; Hunt,
G.E. & Atrens, D.M. (1992).   Parametric manipulations and fixed-interval
self-stimulation.  Physiology and  Behaviour, 51, 1009-
1020, Hunt, G.E., Atrens, D.M. (1992). Reward summation and the effects of 
pimozide, clonidine, and amphetamine on fixed-internal responding for brain 
stimulation. Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior, 42, 563Ä577. 

NAME: Dr D R F Irvine
POSITION: Reader
ADDRESS: Department of Psychology, Monash University, CLAYTON  VIC  3168
PHONE  NO: (613) 565 3963
FAX NO: (613) 565 3948
EMAIL: irvine at monu1.cc.monash.edu.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Auditory.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Neural mechanisms of sound localization and the neural representation of  auditory
space, Plasticity in the auditory system of adult mammals. TECHNIQUES USED
Extracellular single-unit recording, Microelectrode mapping. KEY REFERENCES
Robertson, D., & Irvine, D.R.F. (1989). Plasticity of frequency organization in  auditory
cortex of guinea pigs with partial unilateral deafness. Journal of  Comparative
Neurology, 11:549-557; Irvine, D.R.F., & Gago, G. (1990). Binausal  interaction in
high-frequency neurons in inferior colliculus of the cat:  Effects of variations in sound
pressure level on sensitivity to interaural  intensity differences. Journal of
Neurophysiology, 63: 570-591; Rajan, R.,  Aitkin, L.M., Irivine, D.R.F., & McKay, J.
(1990). Azimuthal sensitivity of  neurons in primary auditory cortex of cats: I. Types of
sentivity and the  effects of variations in stimulus parameters. Journal of
Neurophysiology, 64:  872-887; Rajan, R., Aitkin, L.M., & Irivine, D.R.F. (1990).
Azimuthal  sensitivity of neurons inprimary auditory cortex of cats. II. Organization 
along frequency-bank strips. Journal of Neurophysiology, 64: 888-902; Clarey,  J.C., &
Irvine, D.R.F. (1990). The anterior ectosylvian sulcal auditory field  in the cat. I. An
electrophysiological study of its relationship to surrounding  auditory cortical fields.
Journal of Comparative Neurology, 301: 289-303;  Clarey, J.C., & Irvine, D.R.F.
(1990). The anterior ectosylvian sulcal auditory  field in the cat. II. A horseradish
peroxidase study of its thalamic and  cortical connections. Journal of Comparative
Neurology, 301: 304-324. 

NAME: Dr P L Jeffrey
POSITION: Principal Research Fellow
ADDRESS: Developmental Neurobiology, Children's Medical Research Institute, 
Locked Bag 23, WENTWORTHVILLE  NSW  2145
PHONE NO: (612) 687 2800
FAX NO: (612) 687 2120
SUBJECT AREAS
Cell birth, migration and death, Synaptogenesis, morphogenesis, Membrane 
composition and cell-surface macromolecules, Messenger RNA regulation, gene 
structure and function, Structure and function of identified cells, Retina and  visual
pathways, Cortex and cerebellum, Birds, Mammals.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Molecular composition and interactions occurring on the neuronal surface during 
development and maturation of the nervous system.  Structural and genetic  studies
on avian neuronal surface glycoproteins: Thy-1, synaptophysin, GP50,  Differential
gene expression in developing avian nervous system, cerebellum,  Cell surface
markers in early development (ED6), PC-12 cells: model for  neuronal differentiation. 
Expression of cytoskeletel components, effect of  substrata, glycoprotein expression,
Role cell surface glycoproteins in neuronal  function and development.
TECHNIQUES USED
Cell Biology: avian neuronal culture, PC 12 cell culture, monoclonal  antibodies,
immunohistochemistry, immunoaffinity column isolation of  glycoproteins, Molecular
Biology: neuronal library construction, isolation of  glycoprotein cDNAs, differential and
subtractive hybridization, gene transfer. KEY REFERENCES
Dowsing, B.J., Gooley, A.A., Gunning, P., Cunningham, A., & Jeffrey, P.L.  (1992).
Molecular cloning and primary structure of the avian Thy-1  glycoprotein. Molecular
Brain Research, 14: 250-260, Hancox, K.A., Sheppard,  A.M., & Jeffrey, P.L. (1992).
Characterisation of a novel glycoprotein (AvGp  50) in the avian nervous system, with
a nonoclonal antibody. Dev. Brain  Research, 70: 25-37, Weinberger, R.P., Henke,
R.C., Tolhurst, O., Jeffrey,  P.L., & Gunning, P. (1993). Induction of neuron specific
tropomyosin mRNA by  NGF is dependent on morphological differentiation. J. Cell
Biol. 120: 205-215. 

NAME: Professor G A R Johnston
POSITION: Professor of Pharmacology
ADDRESS: Department of Pharmacology, The University of Sydney, SYDNEY  NSW  
2006
PHONE NO: (612) 692 2408
FAX NO: (612) 692 3868
EMAIL: grahamj at extro.ucc.su.oz.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Cellular aspects of disease, Mechanisms of intracellular transport and  metabolic
studies, Pharmacology of synaptic transmission, Amino acids,  Interaction between
neurotransmitters and neuromodulation, Metabolism of  transmitters and modulators,
Transmitter receptors, Transmitters and receptors  in disease, Stress, hormones and
the autonomic nervous system, Brain  metabolism, Mammals, Human.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Neurochemistry and neuropharmacology of amino acid transmitters, in particular 
GABA and glutamate.  Medicinal chemistry - design, synthesis and evaluation of  new
neuroactive drugs, Studies on the heterogeneity of receptors for GABA and 
glutamate, Modulation of GABA and glutamate action by steroids and related 
compounds, Neurological disorders involving amino acid transmitters. TECHNIQUES
USED
Ligand binding, uptake and release, enzyme studies; HPLC and GC-MS assays, 
Computer aided drug design; Synthetic organic chemistry; Neuropharmacology  using
the hippocampal slice, the cortical wedge, hemisected spinal cord, and  ileum.
KEY REFERENCES
Johnston, G.A.R. (1992). GABA-A agonists as tarets for drug development. Clin.  Exp.
Pharmac. Physiol. 19: 73-78, Capper, H.R., Mewett, K.N., Allan, R.D., &  Johnston,
G.A.R. (1992). Molecular modelling of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)  receptor
agonists and antagonists. Molecular Neuropharmacology. 2: 83-87,  Akinci, M.K., &
Johnston, G.A.R. (1993). Sex differences in the effects of  acute swim stress on
binding to GABA-A receptors in mouse brain. J. Neurochem.  60: 2212-2216.


NAME: Professor D G Jones
POSITION: Professor of Anatomy and Structural Biology
ADDRESS: Anatomy and Structural Biology, University of Otago, P O Box 913, 
DUNEDIN  NZ
PHONE NO: (643) 479 7364
FAX NO: (643) 479 7254
SUBJECT AREAS
Synaptogenesis, morphogenesis; Neuronal and transmitter plasticity; CNS.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Synaptic turnover & remodelling in CNS; Synaptic plasticity - perforated  synapses;
Stereology of synaptic sub-populations; Ethical issues - Brain  grafting.
TECHNIQUES USED
EM; Stereology; 3D Computer reconstruction.
KEY REFERENCES
Jones, D.G. & Calverley, R.K.S. (1991).  Brain Res.  556: 247-258, Jones, D.G.  &
Calverley, R.K.S. (1991).  Neurosci. Lett.  129: 189-192, Jones, D.G. (1991).  
Bioethics, 5: 23-43, Peterson, D.A., & Jones, D.G. (1993). J. Neurosci.  Methods, 46:
107-120; Itarat, W., & Jones, D.G. (1992). Synapse, 11: 279-286. 

NAME: Dr J R Keast
POSITION: Lecturer
ADDRESS: Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Queensland, 
QUEENSLAND  4072
PHONE NO: (617) 365 3334
FAX NO: (617) 365 1766
SUBJECT AREAS
Autonomic nervous system, neuropeptides.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Organization, neurochemistry and physiology of autonomic innervation of the  pelvic
organs, Neuropeptides in autonomic and sensory pathways, Enteric nervous  system,
neural control of secretion.
TECHNIQUES USED
Immunohistochemistry, Retograde and anterograde tracing of nerve pathways, 
Electrophysiology (intracellular recording).
KEY REFERENCES
Keast, J.R., Booth, A.M. & de Groat, W.C. (1989). Distribution of neurons in  the major
pelvic ganglion of the rat which supply the bladder, colon or penis.   Cell Tissue Res.
256: 105-112, Keast, J.R. & de Groat, W.C. (1989).   Immunohistochemical
characterization of pelvic neurons which project to the  bladder, colon or penis in rats.
J. Comp. Neurol. 288: 387-400, Keast, J.R.,  Kawatani, M. & de Groat, W.C. (1990). 
Sympathetic modulation of cholinergic  transmission in cat vesical ganglia is mediated
by a1- and a2-adrenoceptros.   Am. J. Physiol. 258: R44-R50, Somogyi, G.T., Keast,
J.R., Vizi, E.A. (1991).  Presynaptic modulation of the release of noradrenaline from
electrically  stimulated bicuspid valve leaflet of the rabbit heart. J. Autonomic Nerv
Sys.  35: 99-106, Keast, J.R. (1991). Patterns of coexistence of peptides and 
differences of nerve fibre types associated with noradrenergic and putative  cholinergic
neurons in the male rat major pelvic ganglion. Cell Tissue Res.  266: 405-415, Keast,
J.R., De Groat, W.C. (1992). Segmental distribution and  peptide content of primary
afferent neurons innervating the urogenital organs  and colon of male rats. J. Comp
Neurol. 319: 1-9, Keast, JR. (1992). A possible  neural source of nitric oxide in the rat
penis. Neurosci. Letts. 143: 69-73,  Keast, J.R. (1992). Location and peptide content
of pelvic neurons supplying  the muscle and lamina propria of the rat vas deferens. J.
Autonomic Nerv Sys.  40: 1-12, Keast, J.R., McLachlan, E.M., Meckler, R.L.,
Correlation between  electrophysiological class and neuropeptide content of
sympathetic neurones in  guinea-pig prevertebral ganglia. J. Neurophysiol. 69:
384-394. 

NAME: Dr B Key
POSITION: Lecturer
ADDRESS: Anatomy, University of Melbourne, PARKVILLE  VIC  3052 PHONE NO:
(613) 344 5796
FAX NO: (613) 347 5219
SUBJECT AREAS
Synaptogenesis, morphogenesis.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Development of the early axon pathways in the vertebrate nervous system;  Molecular
and cellular cues guiding axons; Topography in the olfactory system. TECHNIQUES
USED
Monoclonal antibody production; Immunohistochemisty; Tissue culture; Antisense 
injection into Xenopus blastomeres; Cloning techniques.
KEY REFERENCES
Key, B. & Akeson, R.A. (1990).  Olfactory neurons express a unique glycosylated 
form of the neural cell adhesion molecule (N-Cam).  J. Cell Biol., 110: 1729- 1743,
Key, B. & Akeson, R.A. (1991).  Delineation of olfactory pathways in the  frog nervous
system by unique glyconconjugates and NCAM glycoforms, neuron, 6:  381-396.


NAME: N G Laing
POSITION: Senior Research Fellow
ADDRESS: Australian Neuromuscular Research Institute, 4th Floor, 'A' Block,  QEII
Medical Centre, NEDLANDS  WA  6009 AUSTRALIA
PHONE NO: (619) 389 3487
FAX NO: (610) 9 389 3487
EMAIL: nlaing at uniwa.uwa.edu.auSUBJECT AREAS
Inherited neurological and neuromuscular diseases.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Nemaline Myopathy; Familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, distal myopathy,  location
of muscle genes in the human genome.
TECHNIQUES USED
Molecular genetic techniques: PCR; Microsatellites, linkage analysis, single  strand
conformation polymorphism analysis.
KEY REFERENCES
Bartlett, R.J. et al. (1989). Inherited deletion at Duchenne dystrophy locus in  normal
male. Lancet i, 496-497; Laing, N.G. et al. (1991). The diagnosis of  Duchenne and
BEcker muscular dystrophy: two years' experience in a  comprehensive carrier
screening and prenatal diagnostic laboratory. Med. J.  Aust. 154: 14-18; Laing, N.G.
(1992). Assignment of a gene (NEM1) for autosomal  dominant nemaline myopathy to
chromosome 1. Am J. Hum GEnet 50: 576-583; Beggs,  A.H. et al (1992) A (CA)n
repeat polymorphism for the skeletal muscle alpha- actinin gene ACTN2 and its
localisation on the CEPH consortium linkage map of  chromosome 1. Genomics 13:
1314-1315; Rosen D.R. et al. (1993). Mutations in  the gene encoding Cu/Zn
superoxide dismutase are associated with familial  amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
Nature, 362: 59-62; Wilton, S.D. et al. (1993).  Two distinct mutations in a single
dystrophin gene: Identification of an  altered splice-site as the primary becker
muscular dystrophy mutation. Am. J.  Med Genet. 46: 563-569, Akkari, P.A. et al
(1993). Assignment of the human  skeletal muscle alpha actin gene (ACTA1) to 1q42
by fluorescence in situ  hybridisation. Cytogenet and Cell Genet (in press).


NAME: Prof W R Levick
POSITION: Head, Visual Neurosciences Unit
ADDRESS: Division of Neurosciences, John Curtin School of Medical Research, GPO 
Box 334 , CANBERRA  ACT  2601
PHONE NO: (616) 249 2525
FAX NO: (616) 249 2687
SUBJECT AREAS
Retina and visual pathways; CNS/PNS neurophysiology demyelination. RESEARCH
INTERESTS
Performance of retinal ganglion cells within and across the border of the focal  lesion
in feline central retinal degeneration: effect of total and partial  deafferentation on
organization of retinal network.  Neurophysiology of a  scotoma.  Neurophysiology of
the electrical phosphene, site of electric  activation of the retina, electrical activation of
blind ganglion cells,  interaction of visual and electrical stimulation, Analysis of
receptive field  mechanisms in rabbit retinal ganglion cells.  Accuracy of response
timing  across the various classes.  Effect of adaptation to luminance, spatial  contrast,
temporal contrast and movement on timing accuracy.  Correlated  discharge of
neighboring ganglion cells.  Effect of centrifugal activity in the  optic pathway of retinal
function, Impulse transmission in myelinated,  unmyelinated and demyelinated optic
axons of cat and rabbit.  Relation between  pattern visually evoked cortical response
and disturbed transmission of single  axons in focal demyelination.  Electrical events
during impulse transmission at  natural and pathological heminodes.
TECHNIQUES USED
In vivo extracellular single unit recording in optic tract and in the intact  eye. 
Computer-
controlled visual stimulus presentation and spike data processing. KEY REFERENCES
Wye-Dvorak, J., Levick, W.R. & Mark, R.F. (1987). Retinotopic organization in  the
dorsal laternal geniculate nucleus of the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii)  J. comp.
Neurol. 263: 198-213, Levick, W.R. (ed.) (1988). Seeing through the  visual system.
Proceedings of the Australian Physiological and Pharmacological  Society, 19: 13-64,
Citron, M.C., Emerson, R.C. & Levick, W.R. (1988).  Nonlinear measurement and
classification of receptive fields in cat retinal  ganglion cells.  Annals of Biomedical
Engineering, 16: 65-78, Levick, W.R., &  Thibos, L.N. (1993). Neurophysiology of
central retinal degeneration in cat.  Visual Neuroscience. 10: 499-509.


NAME: Dr Ida Llewellyn-Smith
POSITION: NH & MRC Senior  Research Fellow, Senior Lecturer ADDRESS:
Department of Medicine, Flinders University of South Australia,  BEDFORD PARK  SA 
5042
PHONE NO: (618) 204 4139
FAX NO: (618) 204 5268
SUBJECT AREAS
Cardiovascular regulation and regulation of other autonomic functions;  Respiratory
regulation; Mammals.
RESEARCH INTERESTS I work as part of a multidisciplinary collaborative group  that
consists of myself, Dr Paul Pilowsky (see separate entry), Dr Jane Minson,  Dr
Leonard Arnoldar and Professor John Chalmers.  My research interests are the 
neural circuits in the medulla and spinal cord that are involved in the control  of the
cardiovascular system and breathing.  Specific current areas of  investigation include:
The neurotransmitter content of nerves that form  synapses with sympathetic
preganglionic neurons, The neuronal circuits that  mediate the respiratory modulation
of sympathetic nerve activity;  Neurotransmitter - identified inputs to medullary
respiratory neurons. TECHNIQUES USED
Light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry.  Retrograde tracing with 
HRP-based tracers, gold-labelled tracers and cholera toxin B.  Anterograde  tracing
with HRP-basing tracers.
KEY REFERENCES
Llewellyn-Smith, I.J., Minson, J.B., Wright, A.P., & Hodgson, A.J. (1990).  Cholera
toxin B-
gold, a retrograde tracer that can be used in light and electron microscopic 
immunocytochemical studies. J. Comp Neurol. 294: 179-191; Minson, J., 
Llewellyn-Smith, I. Neville, A., Somogyi, P., & Chalmers, J. (1990).  Quantitative
analysis of spinally projecting adrenaline-synthesizing neurons of  C1, C2 and C3
groups in rat medulla oblongata. J. Autonom Nerv Sys. 30: 209- 220, Llewellyn-Smith,
I.J., Minson, J.B., Pilowsky, P.M. & Chalmers, J.P.  (1991). There are few
catechomaine or NPY-contained synapses in the  intermediolateral cell column of rate
thoracic spinal cord. Clin. Exp.  Pharmacol. Physiol. 18: 111-115, Pilowsky, P.,
Llewellyn-Smith, I., Minson, J.,  & Chalmers, J. (1992). Sympathetic preganglionic
neurons in rabbit spinal cord  that project to the stellate or the superior cervical
ganglion. Brain Res. 577:  181-188, Llewellyn-Smith, I.J., Minson, J.B., & Pilowksy,
P.M. (1992).  Retrograde tracing with cholera toxin B-gold or
immunocytochemically-detected  cholera toxin B in central nervous system. In.
Methods in Neuroscience. vol. 8,  Neurotoxins, P.M. Conn (Ed). Academic Press, New
York. pp 180-201, Pilowsky,  P.M., Llewellyn-
Smith, I.J., Lipski, J., & Chalmers, J. (1992). Substance, P immunoreactive  boutons
form synapses with feline sympathetic preganglionic neurons. J. Comp  Neurol. 320:
121-135, Llewellyn-Smith, I.J., Phend, K.D., Minson, J.B.,  Pilowsky, P.M., &
Chalmers, J.P. (1992). Glutamate immunoreactive synapses on  retrogradely labelled
sympathetic preganglionic neurons in rat thoracic spinal  cord. Brain Res. 581: 67-80,
Llewellyn-Smith, I.J., Pilowsky, P., & Minson,  J.B. (1992). Retrograde tracers for light
or electro microscopy. In:  Experimental Neuroanatomy: A Practical Approach P.
Bolam, (Ed). Oxford  University Press, Oxford, pp 31-59, Jensen, I., Pilowsky, P.,
Llewellyn-Smith,  I., Minson, J., & Chalmers, J. (1992). Sympathetic preganglionic
neurons  projecting tothe adrenal medulla and aorticorenal ganglion in the rabbit. Brain 
Res. 586: 125-129, Llewellyn-Smith, I.J., & Minson, J. (1992). Complete  penetration
of antibodies into Vibratome sections aftr glutaraldehyde fixation  and ethanol
treatment: Light and electron microscopy for neuropeptides. J.  Histochem Cytochem.
40: 1741-1749, Llewellyn-Smith, I.J., Pilowsky, P., &  Minson, J.B. (1993). The
tungstate-
stablized tetramethylbenzidine reaction for light and electron microscopic 
immunocytochemistry and for revealing biocytin-filled neurons. J. Neurosci  Methods.
46: 27-40, Pilowsky, P.M., & Llewellyn-Smith, I.J. (1993).  Intracellular 'dye-filling in
vivo combined with light and electron microscopic  immunocytochemistry.
Neuroscience Protocols, in press.


NAME: Dr G. J. Little
POSITION: Lecturer in Anatomy
ADDRESS: Discipline of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, The University of  Newcastle,
CALLAGHAN  NEWCASTLE  NSW  2308
PHONE NO: (049) 21 5618
FAX NO: (049) 21 6903
EMAIL: angjl at medicine.newcastle.edu.auSUBJECT AREAS
Cell biology - Glia; Regeneration/degeneration - PNS; Mammals used. 
(Neuroendocrine control: Pineal.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Double myelination; Role of Schwann cells/macrophages in initial stages of 
degeneration in PNS (Pineal function of southern phocids). TECHNIQUES USED
Transmission electron microscopy; Morphometry, Cryo-ultra; Tem 
immunocytochemistry; Confocal microscopy.
KEY REFERENCES
Little, G.J., & Heath, J.W. Morphometric analysis of axons myelinated during  adult life
in the mouse superior cervical ganglion. Submitted J. Anat 1993;  Little, G.J., &
Bryden, M.M. (1990). The Pineal gland in newborn southern  elephant seals, Mirounga
leonina. J. Pineal Research, 9: 139-148. 

NAME: Dr B G Livett
POSITION: Reader in Biochemistry, Deputy Head
ADDRESS: Dept of Biochemistry, University of Melbourne, MELBOURNE  VIC  3000
PHONE NO: (613) 344 5911 or 344 5920
FAX NO: (613) 347 7730
SUBJECT AREAS
Structure and function of identified cells; Pharmacology of synaptic  transmission;
Synaptic structure and function, presynaptic and postsynaptic  mechanisms;
Acetylcholine; Biochemical pharmacology; Catecholamines, serotonin,  histamine and
other biogenic amines; Interaction between neurotransmitters and  neuromodulation;
Peptides: localization, biosynthesis and processing,  metabolism, characterization and
physiological effects; Transmitter receptors;  Neuroendocrine control: other; Mammals;
Neuroeffector mechanisms. RESEARCH INTERESTS
Structure and function of neuronal nicotinic receptors; Role of tachykinins in 
modulation of nicotinic response; Control of adrenal medullary secretion by 
neuropeptides and neurotoxins.
TECHNIQUES USED
Cell culture; Biochemical techniques including HPLC fractionation of peptides  and
catecholamines.  Electrophoresis/blotting; Bioluminescence of ATP. KEY
REFERENCES
Livett, B.G. (1984).  Adrenal medullary chromaffin cells in vitro.   Physiological
Reviews, 64, 1103-1161.; Wan, D.C.C., Marley, P.D. and Livett,  B.G. (1991). 
Coordinate and differential regulation of proenkephalin A and  PNMT mRNA
expression in cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells: Responses to  cAMP elevation
and phorbol esters.  Molecular Brain Research, 9: 135-142.;  Livett, B.G. and Zhou,
X-F (1991).  Substance P interactions with the nicotinic  receptor.  Annals N.Y. Acad.
Sci, 632: 249-262.


NAME: Dr N A Locket
POSITION: Senior Lecturer in Anatomy
ADDRESS: Department of Anatomy & Histology, University of Adelaide, ADELAIDE  
SA  5005
PHONE NO: (618) 303 5435
FAX NO: (618) 223 2076
SUBJECT AREAS
Retina and visual pathways, Invertebrates; Fish.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Eye structure and function in deep-sea fishes; Neuroanatomy (and other aspects)  of
scorpions.
TECHNIQUES USED
LM including silver stains, TEM, SEM.
KEY REFERENCES
Locket, N.A. (1992). Problems of deep foveas. Australian & New Zealand Journal  of
Ophthalmology. 20: 281-295; Denton, E.J., & Locket, N.A. (1989). Possible 
wavelength discrimination by multibank retinae in deep-sea fishes. J. mar.  biol. Ass.,
U.K. 69: 409-435; Locket, N.A. (1986). Albinism and eye structure  in an Australian
scorpion, Urodacus yaschenkoi (Scorpiones, Scorpionidae).  J. Arachnol., 14:
101-115; Locket, N.A. (1992). Problems of deep foveas.  Australian & New Zealand
Journal of Ophthalmology. 20: 281- 295.


NAME: Professor J Ludbrook
POSITION: NH&MRC Senior Principal Research Fellow
ADDRESS: Surgery, University of Melbourne, Royal Melbourne Hospital, PARKVILLE  
VIC  3050
PHONE NO: (613) 347 4170
FAX NO: (613) 347-8332
SUBJECT AREAS
Neuroeffector mechanisms; Transmitters and neuropeptides-chemical coding;  Smooth
and cardiac muscle; Autonomic ganglia; Preganglionic neurones;  Cardiovascular
regulation and regulation of other autonomic functions;  Endocrine effects on the
nervous system; Neuroendocrine control: pituitary;  Neuroendocrine control: other.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
CNS Control mechnisms in hypovolemia and exercise (conscious animals).
TECHNIQUES USED
Selective de-afferentation and de-efferentation; Subarchnoid delivery of  receptor
agonists and antagonists.
KEY REFERENCES
Hales, J.R.S. & Ludbrook, J. (1988).  J. Appl. Physiol.  64: 627-634.;Evans,  R.G.,
Ludbrook, J. & Van Leuwen, A.F. (1989). J. Physiol Lond.  419: 15- 31.;Schadt, J.C. &
Ludbrook, J. (1991). Am. J. Physiol.  260: H305-318; Evans,  R.G., Kapoor, V., &
Ludbrook, J. (1992). J. Cardiovasc. Pharmacol. 19: 1009- 1017.


NAME: Dr A Mackay-Sim
POSITION: Lecturer
ADDRESS: Faculty of Science and Technology, Griffith University, NATHAN  QLD  
4111
PHONE NO: (617) 875 7563
FAX NO: (617) 875 7656
SUBJECT AREAS
Cell birth, migration and death; Structure and function of identified cells;  Action
potentials and ion channels; Other sensory systems; Mammals. RESEARCH
INTERESTS
Structural and functional changes during differentiation from stem cell to  mature
neurone; Model system: olfactory epithelium.
TECHNIQUES USED
Electrophysiology - Patch clamp; Molecular biology - PCR; Electron & light 
microscopy.
KEY REFERENCES
Mackay-Sim, A., Shaman, P. & Moulton, D.G. (1982).  Topographic coding of 
olfactory quality: patterns of epithelial responsivity in the salamander.  J. 
Neurophysiol.  48: 584-
596.;Mackay-Sim, A. & Beard, M.D. (1987).  Hypothyroidism disrupts neural 
development in the olfactor-epithelium of adult mice.  Dev. Brain Res.  36: 
190-198.;Mackay-Sim, A. & Kittel, P. (1991).  Cell dynamics in the adult mouse 
olfactory epithelium: a quantitative autoradiographic study.  J. Neurosci.  11:  979-984.


NAME: Professor R F Mark
POSITION: Professor, Developmental Neurobiology Group
ADDRESS: Developmental Neurobiology Group, Research School of Biological 
Sciences, Australian National University, GPO Box 475, CANBERRA   ACT  2601
PHONE NO: (616) 249 4748
FAX NO: (616) 249 3808
EMAIL: frm 803 @csc2anu.edu.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Synaptogenesis, morphogenesis; CNS/PNS neurophysiology; Retina and visual 
pathways; Somatosensory pathways; Spinal cord and somatic afferents; CNS; 
Comparative neuroanatomy; Mammals (marsupials); Primates.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Development of the mammalian nervous system especially vision.  My research 
program is founded on a large breeding colony of tammar wallabies (Macropus 
eugenii).  Like other marsupials the young are born at a very early stage of 
development of the nervous system which means that they are accessible in the 
pouch for many kinds of experiments that are difficult or impossible in mammals  with
relatively prolonged intra-uterine development, including long-term  electrophysiological
recording from the central nervous system.  Apart from  early birth the marsupials are
neurologically typical mammals and the results  of investigation are directly applicable
to mammals in general and to man.   Australia is the natural place for this program
because of the abundance of  native marsupials and the ease with which they may be
kept in good health and  fecundity.
TECHNIQUES USED
Standard modern neuroanatomical tracing techniques such as horseradish  peroxidase
histochemistry and the use of carbocyanin dyes.  Standard  electrophysiological
techniques of unit and field potential recording with an  emphasis on quantitative
computational methods of analysis. KEY REFERENCES
Sheng, X.M., Marotte, L.R. & Mark, R.F. (1990). Development of connections to  and
from the visual cortex in the wallaby (Macropus eugenii). J. Comp. Neurol.  300:
196-210, Sheng, X.M. Marotte, L.R. & Mark, R.F. (1991). Development of the  laminar
distribution of thalamocortical axons and corticothalamic cell bodies  in the visual
cortex of the wallaby (Macropus eugenii). J. Comp. Neurol. 307:  17-18, Waite,
P.M.E., Marotte, L.R. & Mark, R.F. (1991). Development of the  whisker representation
in the cortex of the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii).  Dev. Brain. Res. 58: 35-41.


NAME: Dr PD Marley
POSITION: NH&MRC Senior  Research Fellow
ADDRESS: Pharmacology, University of Melbourne, PARKVILLE  VIC  3052 PHONE
NO: (613) 344 6893
FAX NO: (613) 347 1452
SUBJECT AREAS
Structure and function of identified cells; Action potentials and ion channels; 
Pharmacology of synaptic transmission; Acetylcholine; Catecholamines,  serotonin,
histamine and other biogenic amines; Interaction between  neurotransmitters and
neuromodulation; Peptides: localization, biosynthesis and  processing, metabolism,
characterization and physiological effects; Second  messengers; Transmitter receptors;
Neuroendocrine control. RESEARCH INTERESTS
Functional organisation of the adrenal medulla: Signal transduction systems in 
chromaffin cells: Receptor regulation of adrenaline secretion and synthesis and  the
signal transduction pathways involved; Pharmacology of protein kinases;  Receptor
localization studies in adrenal medulla; Nervous control of adrenal  catecholamine
secretion; Neurochemical coding of the adrenal medullary  innervation; Nitrergic
neurotransmission in the adrenal medulla. TECHNIQUES USED
Primary cell culture of bovine adrenal chromaffin cells; Catecholamine assay by  HPLC
with electrochemical detection and chemical fluorescence methods; cAMP and  cGMP
measurement by RIA; Tyrosine hydroxylase assays in-situ in intact cells;  Receptor
localization by autoradiography; Retrograde tracing of adrenal  innervation; Isolated
perfused bovine adrenal glands with field stimulation of  their innervation, Nitric oxide
release measured with a soluable guanylate  cyclase assay.
KEY REFERENCES
Bunn, S.J., Marley, P.D. & Livett, B.G. (1988).  The distribution of opioid  binding
subtypes in the bovine adrenal medulla.  Neuroscience 27, 1081-1094,  Marley, P.D.,
Bunn, S.J., Wan, D.C.C., Allen, A.M. & Mendelsohn, F.A.O. (1989).   Localisation of
angiotensin II binding sites in the bovine adrenal medulla  using a labelled specific
antagonist.  Neuroscience, 28, 777Ä787; Keogh, R. &  Marley, P.D. (1991). 
Regulation of cyclic AMP levels by calcium in bovine  adrenal medullary cells.  J.
Neurochem.  57, 1721-1728; Marley, P.D., Thomson,  K.A., Jachno, K. & Johnston,
M.J. (1991).  Histamine-induced increases in  cyclic AMP levels in bovine adrenal
medullary cells.  Br. J. Pharmacol.  104,  839-846; Anderson, K., Robinson, P.J. &
Marley, P.D. (1992).  Cholinergic  regulation of cyclic AMP levels in bovine adrenal
medullary cells.  Br. J.  Pharmacol. (in press), Marley, P.D., Thomson, K.A., &
Smardencas, A. (1993).  Non-cholinergic nervous control of catecholamine secretion
from perfused bovine  adrenal glands. J. Physiol. 465, 489-500.


NAME: Professor C L Masters
POSITION: Professor/Chairman
ADDRESS: Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, PARKVILLE  VIC  
3052
PHONE NO: (613) 344 5872
FAX NO: (613) 344 4004
EMAIL: pathology at pathology.unimelb.edu.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Alzheimer's disease; Amyloid, Aging; Neuropathology.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
We are studying the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders 
(Parkinson's Disease; Huntington's disease) through approaches directed at the 
molecular dissection of the structural lesions.  Thus the bA4 amyloid and its  precursor
protein (APP) are of fundamental significance to Alzheimer's disease,  and most of our
efforts are now focussed on the processing and regulation of  the APP gene and its
products.
KEY REFERENCES
Beyreuther, K. & Masters, C.L.  Molecular biology and genetics of Alzheimer's 
disease, Rumble, B.A., Beyreuther, K. & Masters, C.L. (1991). The molecular 
pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Today's Life Sciences. 4: 24-30, Gajdusek,  D.C. et
al. (1991). Regulation and genetic control of brain amyloid. Bran Res.  Reviews. 16:
83-114.


NAME: Professor D I McCloskey
POSITION: Director
ADDRESS: Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute, High Street, RANDWICK 
NSW   2031
PHONE NO: (612) 399 2682
FAX NO: (612) 399 1037
SUBJECT AREAS
Cardiovascular regulation and regulation of other autonomic functions;  Respiratory
regulation; Somatosensory pathways; Spinal cord and somatic  afferents; Other
sensory systems; Control of posture and movement;  Neuroeffector mechanisms;
Transmitters and neuropeptides-chemical coding. RESEARCH INTERESTS
Neural regulation of cardiovascular and respiratory systems; Proprioception;  Human
motor control.
TECHNIQUES USED
Human experiments, normal subjects, some neurological patients; Intact animal 
experiments - anaesthetised; Neural stimulation and recording. KEY REFERENCES
McCloskey, D.I. (1981).  Corollary discharges and motor commands.  American 
Physiological Society: Handbook of Physiology - Motor Control.  1415-1448;  Taylor,
J.L. & McCloskey, D.I. (1990).  Triggering of pre-programmed movements  as
reactions to masked stimuli.  Journal of Neurophysiology,  63: 439-446;  Revington,
M.L. & McCloskey, D.I. (1988).  Effects of sympathetic stimulation  and
neuropeptide-Y (NPY) on skeletal muscle blood flow.  Regulatory Peptides,  20: 12-22;
McCloskey, D.I. (1987).  Kinaesthetic, kinesthetic perception.  In:  Encyclopedia of
Neuroscience.  Ed. G. Adelman, Birkhauser, Boston.  p.548-551;  Hobbs, S.F. &
McCloskey, D.I. (1987).  Effects of blood pressure on force  production in cat and
human muscle.  Journal of Applied Physiology.  63: 834- 839.


NAME: Dr S A McFadden
POSITION: Senior Lecturer
ADDRESS: Psychology, University of Newcastle, NEWCASTLE  NSW  2308 PHONE
NO: (049) 215 960
FAX NO: (049) 216 980
EMAIL: pssam at cc.newcastle.edu.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Retina and visual pathways; Learning and memory; Comparative neuroanatomy; 
Birds; Visual Optics, Psychophysics Oculomotor systems.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Spatial perception in birds; Form Deprivation Myopia.
TECHNIQUES USED
Optical; Behavioural; Lesion; Neuronal tracing, Mathematical. KEY REFERENCES
McFadden, S.A. (1987).  Vision Research.  27: 1967-1980.;McFadden, S.A. (1990) 
(Review).  Journal of Comparative Psychology.  3: 1-31.


NAME: Professor Elspeth M McLachlan
POSITION: NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellow
ADDRESS: Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute, High Street, RANDWICK 
NSW   2031
PHONE NO: (02) 399 2167
FAX NO: (02) 399 1118
SUBJECT AREAS
Neuroeffector mechanisms; Transmitters and neuropeptides-chemical coding; 
Autonomic ganglia; Preganglionic neurones; Neuroimmunology; PNS; Action 
potentials and ion channels; Synaptic structure and function, presynaptic and 
postsynaptic mechanisms; Cardiovascular regulation and regulation of other 
autonomic functions.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Autonomic nervous system; Autonomic ganglia; Neuro-effector mechanism; 
Regeneration in PNS; Preganglionic neurorels.
TECHNIQUES USED
Electrophysiology, single electrode voltage clamp; Single cell dye labelling; 
Retrograde tracing; Neuropeptide immunohistochemistry; Three-dimensional 
reconstruction.
KEY REFERENCES
Jobling, P., McLanchlan, E.M., Janig, W., & Anderson, C.R. (1992). 
Electrophysiological responses in the rat tail artery during reinnervation  following
lesions of the sympathetic supply. J. Physiol. 454: 107-128, Keast,  J.R., McLachlan,
E.M., & Meckler, R.L. (1993). Relation between  electrophysiological class and
neuropeptide content of guinea-pig sympathetic  prevertebral neurones. J.
Neurophysiol. 69: 383-394, McLachlan, E.M., Janig,  W., Devor, M., & Michaelis, M.
(1993). Peripheral nerve injury triggers  nonadrenergic sprouting within dorsal root
ganglia. Nature, Lond. (in press). 

NAME: Dr N McNaughton
POSITION: Senior Lecturer in Psychology
ADDRESS: Department of Psychology, University of Otago, PO Box 56, DUNEDIN 
NEW  ZEALAND
PHONE NO: (643) 479 7634
FAX NO: (643) 479 8335
EMAIL: NMcN at otago.ac.nz
SUBJECT AREAS
Pharmacology of synaptic transmission; Opiates, endorphins, and enkephalins: 
anatomy, biochemistry and physiology effects; Transmitter receptors;  Motivation,
emotion and behaviour; Stress, hormones and the autonomic nervous  system;
Mammals; Human.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Neural basis for the action of anxiolytic drugs; GABA, Opiate and 5HT receptor 
subtypes and role of stress hormones using neurophysiological models,  Behavioural
profile of anxiolytic drugs and relation to hippocampal  dysfunction, Analysis of neural
pathways underlying hippocampal rhythmical slow  activity: electrophysiology and
pharmacology.
TECHNIQUES USED
Operant behaviour; Microinjections; Evoked potential mapping; Single cell  recording;
Free moving neuropharmacology.
KEY REFERENCES
McNaughton, N., Morris, R.G.M. (1992). Buspirone produces a dose-related 
impairment in spatial navigation. Pharm. Biochem. Behav. 48: 167-171, Money,  E.A.,
Kirk, R.C>, McNaughton, N. (1992). Alzheimer's dementia produces a loss  of
discrimination but no increase in rate of memory decay in delayed matching  to
sample. Neuropsychologia, 30: 133Ä143, Kirk, I., McNaughton, N. (1993).  Mapping of
differential effects of procaine on frequency and amplitude of  reticularly-elicited
hippocampal rhythmical slow activity. Hippocampus, in  press.


NAME: Professor F A O Mendelsohn
POSITION: Professor of Medicine
ADDRESS: Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Austin Hospital,  Studley
Road, HEIDELBERG  VIC  3084
PHONE NO: (613) 496 5477
FAX NO: (613) 457 5485
EMAIL: fredm at austin.unimelb.edu.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Peptides: localization, biosynthesis and processing, metabolism,  characterization and
physiological effects, Transmitter receptors; Transmitters  and receptors in disease;
Cardiovascular regulation and regulation of other  autonomic functions.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
The main interest of the group is neuropeptides and their receptors in the  brain and
spinal cord with particular emphasis on the central control of blood  pressure,
autonomic activity, neuroendocrine function.  A particular focus is  the brain
angiotensin system with mapping of angiotensin receptors and  angiotensin converting
enzyme in various species including human brains.   Physiological experiments have
involved the use of angiotensin agonists and  antagonists to evaluate the roles of
angiotensin at brain sites where receptors  have been detected.  This has involved
microinjection of angiotensin into the  rostral ventrolateral medulla which produces a
neurogenically mediated rise in  blood pressure.  Injections into the caudal
ventrolateral medullar produce a  rise in vasopressing secretion and the baroreceptor
mediated relase of  vasopressing during haemorrhage can be blocked by application
of angiotensis II  antagonists into this site.  Current studies are on the actions of
angiotensin  II on central monoamine release.
TECHNIQUES USED
Quantitative in vitro autoradiographic receptor mapping using computer based  image
analysis, Immunocytochemistry at the light and EM levels for  neuropeptides and
transmitter processing enzymes; In situ hybridization  histochemistry for localization of
mRNAs of interest; Positron emission  tomography in human clinical studies.
KEY REFERENCES
Sexton, P.M., Schneider, H.G., D'Santos, C.S., Mendelsohn, F.A.O., Kemp, B.E., 
Moseley, J.M., Martin, T.J., & Findlay, D.M. (1990). Reversible calcitonin  binding to
solubilised sheep brain binding sites. Biochemical Journal, 273,  179-184; Allen, A.M.,
Jackson, B., Johnston, C.I., & Mendelsohn, F.A.O. (1991).  Localisation of angiotensin
converting enzyme in rat heart. Circulation  Research, 68, 141-149, Chai, S.Y.,
McKinley, M.J., Paxinos, G., & Mendelsohn,  F.A.O (1992). Angiotension connecting
enzyme in monkey brain visualized by  vitro autoradiography. Neuroscience, 42,
483-495, Allen, A.M., Paxinos, G.,  McKinley,k M.J., Chai, S.Y., & Mendelsohn, F.O.A.
(1991). Localization and  characterization of angiotension II receptr binding sites in the
human basal  ganglia, thalamus, midbrain, pons and cerebellum. J. Comp Neurol.
312: 291-298,  Allen, A.M., Paxinos, G., & Mendelsohn, F.A.O. (1992). Localization of 
angiotension receptor binding in the rat brain. Handbook of Chemical  Neuroanatomy,
Elsevier.


NAME: Dr T S Miles
POSITION: Associate Professor of Physiology
ADDRESS: Physiology, University of Adelaide, ADELAIDE  SA  5005 PHONE NO:
(618) 303 5108
FAX NO: (618) 232 5669
SUBJECT AREAS
Control of posture and movement; Muscle and disorders of motor systems; Spinal 
cord and brain stem; Spinal cord and somatic afferents; CNS/PNS  neurophysiology.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Control of human movements; Mastication; Reflex control of skeletal muscles.
TECHNIQUES USED
Surface EMG; Single unit EMG; Controlled stretch of muscles. KEY REFERENCES
Wiesendanger, M. & Miles, T.S. (1982).  Ascending pathway of low-threshold  muscle
afferents to the cerebral cortex and its possible role in motor control.   Physiological
Reviews, 62, 1234-1269; Miles, T.S., Nordstrom, M.A. & Turker,  K.S. (1986a). The
control of motor units: some principles of operation.   Medical Hypotheses, 23, 43-50;
Matthews, P.B.C. & Miles, T.S. (1988).  On the  long-latency reflex responses of the
human flexor digitorum profundus.  Journal  of Physiology (London).;Miles, T.S.,
Turker, K.S. & Le, T.H. (1989).  Ia  reflexes and EPSPs in human soleus motor
neurones.  Experimental Brain  Research, 77, 628-
636; Miles, T.S., Le, T.H. & Turker, K.S. (1988).  Biphasic inhibitory  responses and
their IPSPs evoked by tibial nerve stimulation in human soleus  motor neurones. 
Experimental Brain Research, 77, 637-645; Nordstrom, M.A. &  Miles, T.S. (1990). 
Fatigue of single motor units in human masseter.  Journal  of Applied Physiology, 68,
26-34, Brodin, P., Turker, K.S., & Miles, T.S.  (1993). Mechanoreceptors around the
tooth evoke both inhibitory and excitatory  reflexes in human masseter. Journal of
Physiology, 464: 711-723; Poliakov, A.,  & Miles, T.S. (1992). Quantitative analysis of
reflex responses in the averaged  surface electromyogram. Journal of Neuroscience
Methods, 43: 195-200. 

NAME: Dr I G Morgan
POSITION: Fellow
ADDRESS: Visual Sciences Group, Research School of Biological Sciences and, 
Centre for Visual Science, Australian National University, GPO Box 475,  CANBERRA 
ACT  2601
PHONE NO: (616) 249 4671
FAX NO: (616) 249 3808
SUBJECT AREAS
Structure and function of identified cells, Neurotoxicology, Pharmacology of  synaptic
transmission, Acetylcholine, Amino acids, Catecholamines, serotonin,  histamine and
other biogenic amines, Interaction between neurotransmitters and  neuromodulation,
Metabolism of transmitters and modulators, Opiates,  endorphins, and enkephalins:
anatomy, biochemistry and physiology effects,  Peptides: localization, biosynthesis and
processing, metabolism,  characterization and physiological effects; Second
messengers; Transmitter  receptors, Retina and visual pathways.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
I am interested in defining the circuits which underlie retinal function.  The  functioning
of the outer retina is now quite well understood, but why there are  as many as 40-50
distinct types of amacrine cells and how they function is far  from clear.  My group has
approached this question in three ways: 1. by  characterising retinal cells
morphologically, particularly using  immunohistochemical techniques; 2. by developing
techniques for the destruction  of amacrine cells as a class (with intravitreal kainic acid
or NMDA), or  specific types of amacrine cell (cholinergic cells with ethylcholine
mustard  aziridinium ions, sereotonergic cells with 5, 7-dihydroxytryptamine, 
dopaminergic cells with 6-hydroxydopamine); 3. by characterising retinal  transmitter
systems using biochemical techniques.  Various combinations of  these approaches
are currently being applied to elucidate the general functions  of amacrine cells by
monitoring ganglion cell physiology and visual performance  after amacrine cell
lesions.  We have a specific interest in the synaptic basis  of motion and directional
selectivity, and in the functions of peptidergic  amacrine cells.
TECHNIQUES USED
Anything that seems useful to answer the questions we have. KEY REFERENCES
Van der Valk, J., Morgan, I.G. & Dvorak, D.R. (1990). Identification of kainic  and
quisqualic acid receptors on inner retinal cells of the salamander  Ambystoma
mexicanum. Eur. J. Pharmacol. 184: 147-150, Golcich, M.A., Morgan,  I.G. & Dvorak,
D.R. (1990). OFF-
responses are absent in kainic acid-lesioned chicken retina. Brain Res. 535:  288-300,
Morgan, I.G. & Chubb, I.W. (1991). How peptidergic neurons adapt to  high
physiological demand. Neurochem. Res. 16: 705-714.


NAME: Dr J L Morris
POSITION: Senior Research Fellow
ADDRESS: Department of Anatomy & Histology, Flinders University, Box 2100, 
ADELAIDE  SA  5001
PHONE NO: (618) 204 4263
FAX NO: (618) 277 0085
EMAIL: ayjlm at gamgee.cc.flinders.edu.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Catecholamines, serotonin, histamine and other biogenic amines; Interaction  between
neurotransmitters and neuromodulation; Opiates, endorphins, and  enkephalins:
anatomy, biochemistry and physiology effects; Peptides:  localization, biosynthesis and
processing, metabolism, characterization and  physiological effects; Transmitter
receptors; Cardiovascular regulation and  regulation of other autonomic functions;
Reptiles; Amphibia; Mammals. RESEARCH INTERESTS
I am studying both anatomical and functional aspects of the peripheral  autonomic
nervous system in a range of vertebrates.  I am primarily concerned  with autonomic
control of the cardiovascular system, and the roles of  neuropeptides in transmission 
to the vasculature.  Techniques used in the  laboratory include immunohistochemistry,
in vitro studies of blood vessels, and  in vivo video microscopy of vascular beds. 
Pharmacological studies are carried  out to determine the vascular actions of
neuropeptides contained in autonomic  neurons, and autonomic neurons are
stimulated electrically or reflexly to  determine the contributions of peptides to the
transmission process.  These  experiments are mostly carried out on guinea-
pigs, but comparative studies on amphibians, reptiles and marsupial mammals are 
also conducted.
TECHNIQUES USED
Immunohistochemistry, Peptide pharmacology, Neurotransmission in vitro and in  vivo.
KEY REFERENCES
Morris, J.L. (1990). Roles of neuropeptide Y and noradrenaline in sympathetic 
neurotransmission to the thoracic inferior vena cava and aorta of guinea-pigs. 
Regulatory Peptides 32: 297-310; Morris, J.L. & Gibbins, I.L. (1992).  Co- transmission
and neuromodulation. In: The Autonomic Nervous System. Vol. 1.  Autonomic
Neuroeffector Mechanisms, Eds. G. Burnstock and C. Hoyle, Harwood,  Chur, pp
33-119, Morris, J.L. (1993). Co-transmission from autonomic  vasodilator neurons
supplying the guinea-pig uterine artery. Journal of the  Autonomic Nervous System,
42: 11-22.


NAME: Dr G M Nicholson
POSITION: Lecturer
ADDRESS: Department of Biochemistry & Physiology, University of Technology, 
Sydney, Level 14, Broadway, SYDNEY  NSW  2007
PHONE NO: (612) 218 9549
FAX NO: (612) 281 6876
SUBJECT AREAS
Action potentials and ion channels, Pharmacology of synaptic transmission,  Synaptic
structure and function, presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. RESEARCH
INTERESTS
Alterations in transmitter release induced by the presynaptic snake neurotoxin, 
textilotoxin: an electrophysiological study, Electrophysiological effects of 
anti-convulsant, anti-
arrythmic, local anaesthetic drugs and spider toxin on voltage-sensitive sodium 
channels, Development of presynaptic nicotinic autoreceptors controlling  transmitter
release.
TECHNIQUES USED
Standard intracellular, extracellular recording from in vitro preparations.  
Electromyography.  In the near future - patch clamping of cultured neuroblatoma 
cells.
KEY REFERENCES
Nicholson, G.M., Spence, I. & Johnston, G.A.R. (1988). Depolarizing actions of 
convulsant barbiturates on isolated rat dorsal root ganglion cells. Neurosci.  Lett. 93:
330-335, Nicholson, G.M., Spence I. & Johnston, G.A.R. (1990).  Calcium-dependent
action of the convulsant barbiturate, CHEB, on transmitter  release at the rate
neuromuscular junction. Gen. Pharmacol. 21: 741-746,  Nicholson, G.M., Spence, I.,
Tyler, M., Comis, A. & Howden, M.E.H. (1990).  Funnel-web spider toxins produce
repetitive firing in excitable cells.   Toxicon. 28: 254-255.


NAME: Dr L F B Nicholson
POSITION: Senior Lecturer in Biology for Medicine
ADDRESS: Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Auckland, Private Bag  92019,
AUCKLAND  NEW ZEALAND
PHONE NO: (649) 373 7599 ext: 6579
FAX NO: (649) 373 7484
SUBJECT AREAS
Transmitter receptors; Transmitters and receptors in disease; Mammals;  Primates;
Human.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
The distribution and compartmentalization of neurotransmitter receptors and  related
neurotransmitters in the basal ganglia of the human brain as the basis  for studies on
motor disorders including Huntington's Disease, Parkinson's  Disease and Alzheimer's
Disease; Use of an animal model for Huntington's  Disease to investigate receptor
changes with time and the neuronal and  ultrastructural localization of receptors in the
lesioned rat; Special interest  in the distribution of the major inhibitory neurotransmitter
GABA and the  benzodiazepine-
GABAA receptor found in high concentration in the basal ganglia. TECHNIQUES
USED
Light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry; Immunofluroescence antibody 
labelling; Autoradiography using radioactive receptor and neurotransmitter  ligands; In
situ hybridization using 35S and alkaline phosphatase labelled  oligonucleotide probes.
KEY REFERENCES
Faull, R.L.M. and Villiger, J.W. (1986).  Heterogeneous distribution of  benzodiazepine
receptors in the human striatum: a quantitative autoradiographic  study comparing the
pattern of receptor labelling with the distribution of  acetylcholinestrase staining.  Brain
Research, 381, 153-158; Faull, R.L.M. and  Villiger J.W. (1988).  Multiple
benzodiazepine receptors in the human basal  ganglia: a detailed pharmacological and
anatomical study.  Neuroscience, 24,  433-451; Jansen, K.L.R., Faull, R.L.M.,
Dragunow, M. and Synek, B. (1990).   Alzheimer's disease: changes in hippocampal
NMDA, quisqualate, neurotensin,  adenosine, benzodiazepine, serotonin and opioid
receptors: an autoradiographic  study.  Neuroscience, 39, 613-627; Nicholson, L.F.B.,
Faull, R.L.M., Waldvogel,  H.J. and Dragunow, M. (1992).  The regional, cellular and
subcellular  localization of GABAA/Benzodiazepine receptors in the substantia nigra of
the  rat.  Neuroscience, 50, 355-370.


NAME: Dr M A Nordstrom
POSITION: R.D. Wright Fellow of the NH&MRC of Australia
ADDRESS: Physiology, University of Adelaide, G P O Box 498, ADELAIDE  SA  5001
PHONE NO: (618) 303 5108
FAX NO: (618) 232 5669
EMAIL: mnorostr at gina.science.adelaide.edu.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Spinal cord and somatic afferents; Control of posture and movement; Muscle and 
disorders of motor systems; Spinal cord and brain stem.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Control and mechanical properties of single motor units in human voluntary 
contractions; Reflex responses of single motor units to various sensory inputs; 
Features of the common synaptic input to motoneurons revealed by the cross-
correlogram; Changes in the control of motor units during muscle fatigue.
TECHNIQUES USED
Reflex studies of single motor units in humans using electrical and natural  stimuli;
Studies of the mechanical properties of motor units in man, using  spike-triggered
averaging; Cross-
correlation of motor unit spike trains.
KEY REFERENCES
Nordstrom, M.A., Fuglevand, A.J. and Enoka, R.M. (1992).  Estimating the  strength of
common input to motoneurons from the cross-correlogram.  J.  Physiol. (Lond.), 453:
457-
574; Nordstrom, M.A. and Miles, T.S. (1991).  Instability of motor unit firing  rates
during prolonged isometric contractions in human masseter.  Brain Res.   549:
268-274; Nordstrom, M.A. and Miles, T.S. (1991).  Discharge variability  and
physiological properties of human masseter motor units.  Brain Res.  541:  50-56;
Nordstrom, M.A., Miles, T.S. and Turker, K.S. (1990).  Synchronization  of motor units
in human masseter during a prolonged isometric contraction.  J.  Physiol. (Lond.). 
426: 409-421; Nordstrom, M.A. and Miles, T.S. (1990).   Fatigue of single motor units
in human masseter.  J. Appl. Physiol.  68(1): 26- 34; Nordstrom, M.A., Miles, T.S. and
Veale, J.L. (1989).  Effect of motor unit  firing pattern on twitches obtained by
spike-triggered averaging.  Muscle &  Nerve, 12: 556-567; Speilmann, J.M., Laouris,
Y., Nordstrom, M.A., Robinson,  G.A., Reinking, R.M., & Stuart, D.G. (1993).
Adaptation of cat motoneurons to  sustained and intermittent extracellular activation. J.
Physiol. (Lond). 464:  75-120.


NAME: Dr V Nurcombe
POSITION: Lecturer in Neuroscience
ADDRESS: Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Melbourne, 
PARKVILLE  VIC  3052
PHONE NO: (613) 344 5795
FAX NO: (613) 347 5219
SUBJECT AREAS
Cell structure; Cell birth, migration and death; Synaptogenesis, morphogenesis; 
Membrane composition and cell-surface macromolecules; Messenger RNA regulation, 
gene structure and function; Diseases of the nervous system. RESEARCH
INTERESTS
This laboratory uses a multidisciplinary apporach to answer questions within  the
province of developmental neurobiology; we are particularly interested in  the way that
the extracellular environment interacts with neuroepithelial cells  to trigger and direct
their proliferation, and further how the extracellular  matrix interacts and combines with
specific neural trophic factors to drigger  downstream neuronal survival and neuritic
outgrowth.  We use several different  model systems, including the embryonic mouse
neuroepithelium and immortalised  cell lines made from them as well as in vitro
postmitotic central and  peripheral neurons.  Biochemical purification of new trophic
factors is also  proceeding, using these neurons as a bioassay, and novel extracellular 
molecules are being cloned.  Our aim is to come to some sort of comprehensive 
understanding of the combinational effects of these extracellular influences on 
developing neuronal cells, and to use this knowledge to develop novel  therapies.
TECHNIQUES USED
Cell culture of the developing nervous system, including time-lapse video- microscopy
and computerized image analysis.  Biochemical purification using  standard
chromatography and HPLC of neurally-derived bioactive factors.   Standard molecular
biological manipulation of such purified factors, including  cloning and sequencing, and
polymerase chain reaction.
KEY REFERENCES
Nurcombe, V. et al. (1993). Developmental regulation of neural response to FGF- 1
and FGF-
2 by heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Science, 260: 103-106, Bertram, J.F., & 
Nurcombe, V. (1992). Counting cells with the new stereology. Trends in Cell  Biology,
2: 177-180, Nurcombe, V. et al. (1992). MK: a pluripotential embryonic 
stem-cell-derived neuroregulatory factor. Development, 116: 1175-1183. 

NAME: Associate Professor J N O'Neil (Pennefather)
POSITION: Head of Department
ADDRESS: Department of Pharmacology, Monash University, Wellington Road, 
CLAYTON  VIC  3168
PHONE NO: (613) 565 4866
FAX NO: (613) 565 5851
SUBJECT AREAS
Acetylcholine; Amino acids; Biochemical pharmacology; Catecholamines,  serotonin,
histamine and other biogenic amines; Interaction between  neurotransmitters and
neuromodulation; Metabolism of transmitters and  modulators; Opiates, endorphins,
and enkephalins: anatomy, biochemistry and  physiology effects; Peptides: localization,
biosynthesis and processing,  metabolism, characterization and physiological effects;
Second messengers;  Transmitter receptors; Transmitters and receptors in disease;
Cardiovascular  regulation and regulation of other autonomic functions; Endocrine
effects on  the nervous system; Neuroendocrine control: pituitary; Neuroendocrine
control:  other; Respiratory regulation.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Major areas of research are in the hormonal modulation of neurotransmitter  receptor
mediated functions.  A particular interest is in the regulation, by  steroid hormones, of
the responses of uterine smooth muscle to amines and  peptides and purines.
TECHNIQUES USED
Radioligand receptor binding techniques; Histochemistry; Class isolated organ 
functional studies: Enzyme assays.
KEY REFERENCES


NAME: Dr D E Oorschot
POSITION: Lecturer
ADDRESS: Anatomy, University of Otago Medical School, P O Box 913, DUNEDIN,
NEW  ZEALAND
PHONE NO: (643) 479 7379
FAX NO: (643) 479 0401
SUBJECT AREAS
Cell Structure; Synaptogenesis, morphogenesis; Cellular aspects of disease; 
Structure and function of identified cells; Acetylcholine; Amino acids. RESEARCH
INTERESTS
Neonatal hypoxia and the developing rat brain.
TECHNIQUES USED
Stereology; Tissue culture; Immunocytochemistry.
KEY REFERENCES
Oorschot, D.E. and Jones, D.G. (1991).  Neuronal survival and neurite growth in 
cultured cerebral explants: Assessment of the effect of cytosine arabinoside  using
improved stereology.  Brain Res.  546: 146-150.;Oorschot, D.E., Peterson,  D.A. and
Jones, D.G. (1991).  Neurite growth from, and neuronal survival  within, cultured
explants of the nervous system: A critical review of  morphometric and stereological
methods, and suggestions for the future.  Prog.  Neurobiol.  37: 525-546.


NAME: Dr J M Orian
POSITION: Research Fellow
ADDRESS: Surgery (Royal Melbourne Hospital), The University of Melbourne, 
PARKVILLE  VIC  3052
PHONE NO: (613) 344 5491
FAX NO: (613) 347 8332
SUBJECT AREAS
Myelin; Neuropathology (glial tumours); Mammals; Human.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Myelin disorders; Glial tumours.
TECHNIQUES USED
Transgenic mice; Molecular biology; Protein analysis; Histology and EM; 
Histochemistry & cell culture.
REFERENCES
Orian, J. M. (1992). British J. Cancer. 66: 106-112.


NAME: Professor George Paxinos
POSITION: Professor
ADDRESS: School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, P O Box 1, 
KENSINGTON  NSW  2033
PHONE NO: (612) 697 3040
FAX NO: (612) 662 6279
SUBJECT AREAS
Neuropathology; Peptides: localization, biosynthesis and processing, Pain:  central
pathways and modulation; Comparative neuroanatomy. RESEARCH INTERESTS
CNS Morphology; Pain perception.
TECHNIQUES USED Immunohistochemistry; C-fos; Behavioural.
KEY REFERENCES
Paxinos, G. and Watson, C. (1986).  The rat brain in stereotoxic coordinator.  
Academic Press.; Paxinos, G., Tork, I., Tecott, L.H. and Valentino, K.L.   (1991) Atlas
of the developing rat brain, Academic Press: San Diego.; Paxinos,  G. (Ed)(1990). 
The human nervous system.  Academic Press: San Diego.; Paxinos,  G. (Ed)(1990).


NAME: Dr M P Pender
POSITION: Associate Professor of Medicine
ADDRESS: Department of Medicine, Clinical Sciences Building, Royal Brisbane 
Hospital, HERSTON, BRISBANE  QLD  4029
PHONE NO: (617) 365 5132
FAX NO: (617) 365 5462
SUBJECT AREAS
CNS/PNS neurophysiology; Diseases of the nervous system; Neuropathology.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Neuroimmunology: Immunological, biochemical, histopathological, 
immunocytochemical and electrophysiological studies in vivo and in vitro on 
experimental allergic encephalomyelitis and experimental allergic neuritis,  Clinical and
immunological studies in multiple sclerosis.
TECHNIQUES USED
Light microscopy; electron microscopy; immunocytochemistry; myelin protein 
purification; neurophysiological studies; tissue culture of glia and  lymphocytes; T-cell
proliferation and cytotoxicity assays; flow cytometry;  Tcell cloning.
KEY REFERENCES
Stanley, G.P., & Pender, M.P. (1991).l The pathophysiology of chronic relapsing 
experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in the Lewis rat. Brain, 114: 1827- 1853,
Stanley, G.P., McCombe, P.A., & Pender, M.P. (1992). Focal conduction  block in the
dorsal root ganglion in experimental allergic neuritis.  Annals of  Neurology, 31: 27-33,
Pender, M.P., McCombe, P.A., Yoong, G., & Nguyen, K.B.  (1992). Apoptosis of a b T
lymphocytes in the nervous system in experimental  autoimmune encephalomyelitis:
its possible implications for recovery and  acquire tolerance.  Journal of Autoimmunity,
5: 401-410; McCombe, P.A.,  Fordyce, B.W., de Jersey, J., Yoong, G., & Penders,
M.P. (1992). Expression of  CD45RC and Ia antigen in the spinal cord in acute
experimental allergic  encephalomyelitis: an immunocytochemical and flow cytometric
study. Journal of  Neurological Sciences, 113: 177-186.


NAME: Professor Alan G Pettigrew
POSITION: Pro-Vice Chancellor
ADDRESS: Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, BRISBANE  QLD 
4072 PHONE NO: (61) 7 365 1609
FAX NO: (61) 7 365 1613
EMAIL: a.pettigrew at mailbox.uq.oz.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Neuronal and transmitter plasticity, Synaptogenesis, morphogenesis, CNS/PNS 
neurophysiology, Action potentials and ion channels, Auditory; Spinal cord and  brain
stem; Birds; Mammals; Primates; Human.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Current research is concerned with: Analysis of the voltage- and agonist-gated  ion
channels and second messenger systems which underlie spontaneous activity  in
neurons in the brainstem of mammals, The role of neuronal activity  (spontaneous and
generated) in: the formation of ordered patterns of  connections between neurons and;
the development of excitability of neurons in  the brainstem auditory pathway of the
chick embryo; and the development of  binaural processing in human neonates and
the influence of adverse perinatal  conditions on this development.
TECHNIQUES USED
Intracellular and whole cell patch clamp recordings from neurons in tissue  slices in
vitro, morphological analyses of cell structure and connections using  intracellular dyes
and retrograde and anterograde transport, recording of  sensory evoked responses
from human and primate neonates.
KEY REFERENCES
Rogers, S.H., Edwards, D.A., Henderson-Smart, D.J. & Pettigrew, A.G. (1989).  Middle
latency auditory evoked responses in normal term infants: A longitudinal  study.
Neuropediatrics 20: 59-63, Ansselin, A.D. & Pettigrew, A.G. (1990).  Patterns of
functional innervation in the auditory nuclei of the chick  brainstem following early
unilateral removal of the otocyst. Dev. Brain Res.  54: 177-186, Pettigrew, A.G.,
Henderson-Smart, D.J. & Edwards, D.A. (1990).  Evoked potentials and functional
development of the auditory system. In:  Information Processing in the Mammalian
Auditory and Tactile Systems. Eds. M.  Rowe & L. Aitkin, Alan R. Liss Inc. New York
pp 295-308.


NAME: Dr J O Pickles
POSITION: ARC Senior Research Fellow
ADDRESS: Vision Touch and Hearing Research Centre, Department of Physiology & 
Pharmacology, University of Queensland, QUEENSLAND  4072
PHONE NO: (617) 365 3108
FAX NO: (617) 371 7433
EMAIL: vthrc at cc.uq.oz.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Auditory; Cell structure; Cellular aspects of disease; Structure and function  of
identified cells; Aging; Fish; Reptiles; Amphibia; Birds; Mammals. RESEARCH
INTERESTS
The development, function, maintenance, and repair of auditory hair cells, with  special
reference to the mechanotransducing structures on the hair cells, i.e.  the stereocilia,
the linkages between them, and the mechanotransducer channels.   The aim is to give
basic information on: auditory mechanotransduction, the  possible prevention or
alleviation of sensorineural hearing loss; and the  development and maintenance of
the cytoskeleton in a model system. TECHNIQUES USED
Scanning and transmission electron microscopy; Cell culture; Autoradiography. KEY
REFERENCES
Pickles, J.O. (1988). An Introduction to the Physiology of Hearing (Second  Edition)
Academic Press, London, pp.367, Pickles, J.O., Brix, J., Comis, S.D.,  Gleich, O.,
Koppl, C., Manley, G.A., & Osborne, M.P. (1989). The organization  of tip links and
stereocilia on hair cells of bird and lizard basilar papillae,  Hear. Res. 41: 31-42,
Pickles, J.O., & Corey, D.P. (1992). Mechanoelectrical  transduction by hair cells.
Trends Neurosci. 15: 254-259.


NAME: Dr Paul Pilowsky
POSITION: Lecturer
ADDRESS: Department of Medicine, Flinders University of South Australia, 
BEDFORD PARK  SA  5042
PHONE NO: (618) 204 4293
FAX NO: (618) 204 5268
SUBJECT AREAS
Central control of blood pressure and respiration.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Neural circuitry of the brainstem and spinal cord that is involved in the  control of the
cardiovascular and respiratory systems.
TECHNIQUES USED
Intracellular recording from tneurons in the brainstem and spinal cord in vivo. 
Intracellular dye-filling of neurons in vivo. Immunocytochemistry. Light  microscopy.
KEY REFERENCES
Pilowsky, P., de Castro, D., Llewellyn-Smith, I., Lipski, J., Voss, M. (1990).  Serotonin
immunoreactive boutons make synapses with feline phrenic mononeurons.  J.
Neurosci. 10: 1091-1098, Pilowsky, P., Jiang, C., Lipski, J. (1990). An  intracellular
study of respiratory neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla  of the rat and their
relationship to catecholamineÄ-containining neurons. J.  Comp Neurol. 301: 604-617,
Pilowsky, P.M., Lipski, J., Prestidge, R., Jiang, C.  (1991). Dual fluorescence
combined with a two-color immunoperoxidase technique:  a new way of visualizing
diverse neuronal elements. J. Neurosci Meth. 36: 185- 193, Chalmers, J., & Pilowsky,
P. (1991). Brainstem and bulbospinal  neurotransmitter systems in the control of blood
pressur. J. Hyperten. 9: 675- 694; Minson, J., Pilowsky, P., Llewellyn-Smith, I.,
Kaneko, T., Kapoor, V.,  Chalmers, J. (1991). Glutamate in spinally projecting neurons
of the rostral  ventral medulla. Brain Res. 555: 326-
331, Pilowsky, P., Llewellyn-Smith, I., Lipski, J., Chalmers, J. (1992).  Substance P
immunoreactive boutons form synapses with feline sympathetic  preganglionic
neurons: an intracellular and electron microscope study. J. Comp  Neurol. 320:
121-135, Pilowsky, P., Llewellyn-Smith, I., Minson, J., Chalmers,  J. (1992).
Sympathetic preganglionic neurons in rabbit spinal cord that project  to the stellate or
the superior cervical ganglion. Brain Res. 577: 181-188,  Jensen, I., Pilowsky, P.M.,
Llewellyn-Smith, I.J., Minson, J., Chalmers, J.  (1992). Sympathetic preganglionic
neurons projecting to the adrenal medulla and  renal ganglion in the rabbit. Brain Res.
586: 125-129, Minson, J., Kapoor, V.,  Llewellyn-Smith, I., Pilowsky, P., Chalmers, J.
(1992). Kainic acid injection  in NTS evokes hypertension and c-fos expression in
spinal cord. Neuro. Reports,  3: 437-400.


NAME: Professor R Porter
POSITION: Dean of the Faculty of Medicine
ADDRESS: Faculty of Medicine, Monash University, Wellington Road, CLAYTON  VIC 
 3168
PHONE NO: (613) 565 4318
FAX NO: (613) 565 4302
EMAIL: rporter at ccs.cc.monash.edu.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Control of posture and movement, Cortex and cerebellum, Spinal cord and brain 
stem, Mammals, Primates, Human.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Electrophysiology of synaptic transmission in the mammalian spinal cord.   Reflex
control of motoneurones.  Corticospinal influences on motor systems.   Structure and
functions of corticospinal connections.  Organization of motor  areas of the cerebral
cortex.  Corticocortical connections between cells in  motor areas.  Recordings of
discharges of pyramidal cells in motor areas of the  cerebral cortex during natural
movement performance by conscious monkeys.   Functions of neurons in premotor
and supplementary motor areas.  Subcortical  connections of motor areas with
cerebellum and basal ganglia. TECHNIQUES USED
Intracellular recordings from cortical and spinal neurons.  Intracellular  labelling of
physiologically characterised neurons.  Extracellular recordings  from cortical and
subcortical neurons during movement performance. KEY REFERENCES
Porter, R. (1990). Somatosensory Projections to the Motor Cortex. In:  Information
Processing in Mammalian Auditory & Tactile Systems, Vol. 56  Neurology/Biology
Series. Ed. Rowe, M.J. & Aitkin, L.M. pp 157-167, Colebatch,  J.G., Porter, R., Sayer,
R.J. & White, O.B. (1990).  Responses of monkey  precentral neurones to passive
movements and phasic muscle stretch: relevance  to man.  Electroenceph. clin.
Neurophysiol. 75: 44-55, Porter, R. (1990).   Brain Mechanisms of Voluntary Motor
Commands. A Review.  Electroenceph. clin.  Neurophysiol.  76: 282-293.


NAME: Dr D A Powis
POSITION: Associate Professor in Human Physiology
ADDRESS: Neuroscience Group, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Newcastle, 
NEWCASTLE  NSW  2308
PHONE NO: 61 49 21-5625
FAX NO: 61 49 21-6903
EMAIL: hpdap at newcastle.medicine.edu.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Pharmacology of synaptic transmission; Synaptic structure and function;  Presynaptic
and postsynaptic mechanisms; Catecholamines, Interaction between 
neurotransmitters; Neuromodulation; Second messengers; Transmitter receptors.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Mechanisms of neurotransmitter release and modulation in sympathetic nerves and 
adrenal medullary chromaffin cells; Mechanisms for regulating intracellular  calcium
availability in neurosecretory cells; The effects of cardioactive  steroids on
neurotransmitter release.
TECHNIQUES USED
Cell culture; HPLC for catecholamines; Radioisotope tracer techniques using 3H, 
22Na, 45Ca, 54Mn, 86Rb; Fluorescent indicator techniques (fura 2, fluo 3) for 
intracellular free calcium determinations; Confocal microscopy;  microfluorimetry.
KEY REFERENCES
Powis, D.A. & Baker, P.F. (1986).  adrenoceptors do not regulate catecholamine 
secretion by bovine adrenal medullary cells: A study with clonidine.  Molecular 
Pharmacology, 29, 134Ä141.;Powis, D.A. (1987). 2-adrenoceptor blockade prevents 
cardiac glycoside-evoked neurotransmitter release from sympathetic nerves in  dog
saphenous vein.  British Journal of Pharmacology, 92, 213-220.;Powis, D.A.,  O'Brien,
K.J. & Torok, T.L. (1989).  Multiple effects of cocaine upon evoked  secretion in
bovine adrenal medullary chromaffin cells: Additional insight into  the mechanism of
action of cardiac glycosides.  Naunyn-
Schmiedebergs Archives of Pharmacology, 339, 272-280.;Torok, T.L. & Powis, D.A. 
(1990).  Catecholamine release from bovine chromaffin cells: the role of the 
sodium-calcium exchange in ouabain-evoked release.  Experimental Physiology,  75,
573-586.;Powis, D.A., O'Brien, K.J. & von Grafenstein, H.R.K. (1991).   Calcium export
by sodium-exchange in bovine chromaffin cells.  Cell Calcium,  12, 493-504.;Powis,
D.A. & O'Brien, K.J. (1991).  Angiotensin increases  catecholamine release from
bovine adrenal medulla but does not enhance that  evoked by K+ depolarization or by
carbachol.  J. Neurochem.  57, 1461,1469. 

NAME: Dr U Proske
POSITION: Reader
ADDRESS: Department of Physiology, Monash University, CLAYTON  VIC  3168
PHONE NO: (613) 565 2526
FAX NO: (613) 565 2547
EMAIL: phy180u at mon1.cc.monash.edu.au
SUBJECT AREAS
The main thrust of my current research is in the area of muscle receptors and  their
reflex action.  Currently we are studying the properties of muscle  spindles, in
particular, the changes in their responsiveness following changes  in the muscle's
immediate previous history.  We are examining the consequences  of these changes
for reflex action and for proprioception.  We are testing  ankle and knee tendon
reflexes in human subjects after maximum voluntary  contractions at several different
lengths.  Similarly we are looking at the  effect of arm and neck muscle contractions
on the perceived position of our  forearm, head and eyes.  A second ongoing project,
but where progress depends  on the outcome of permit applications is the work on
electroreceptors in the  two Australian monotremes, the platypus and echidna.  We
received a permit to  capture and use 4 animals.  The experiments are done over a
period of 6 weeks.   Successful applications come every 3-4 years.  Finally, we are
currently  studying the changes in a muscle that occur after it has undergone a series
of  lengthening contractions (eccentric contractions).  The objective is to provide  a
physiological basis for the well-known muscle soreness which develops  following
eccentric exercise.
TECHNIQUES USED
Studies on the receptors use anaesthetised cats.  Recordings are made from 
functionally single afferents in filaments of dorsal root.  The human  experiments
involve conventional electromyogram and torque recordings. KEY REFERENCES
Proske, U., Morgan, D.L., & Gregory, J.E. (1992). Muscle history dependence of 
responses to stretch of primary and secondary endings of cat soleus muscle  spindles.
J. Physiol. 445: 81-95; Proske, U., Gregory, J.E., & Iggo, A. (1992).  Activity in the
platypus brain evoked by weak electrical stimulus of the bill.  In: Platypus & Echidnas,
ed. M.L. Augee. The Royal Zoological Society of NSW,  Sydney. pp. 204-210; Proske,
U., Morgan, D.L., & Gregory, J.E. (1992). Muscle  history dependence of responses of
muscle spindles to stretch. In: Muscle  afferents and spinal control of movement, ed.
L. Jami, E. Pierrot-Deseilligny &  D. Zytnicki, pp. 47-51, Pergamon, Oxford.


NAME: Dr J M Provis
POSITION: Senior Lecturer (Anatomy & Histology,, Clinical Ophthalmology)
ADDRESS: Department of Anatomy, University of Sydney, SYDNEY  NSW  2006
PHONE NO: (612) 692 4195 or 332 8454
FAX NO: (612) 552 2026
SUBJECT AREAS
Cell birth, migration and death, Blood-brain barrier, Cellular aspects of  disease, Glia,
Retina and visual pathways, Mammals, Human. RESEARCH INTERESTS
The primary aim of the research group is to further the understanding of the  structure
and function, in health and disease, of the human retina.  Through  our association
with the Sydney Eye Hospital, where the main laboratories are  located, we have
access to human ocular tissues in an age range from 10 weeks  gestation through to
old age.  The majority of tissues obtained are in good  condition and suitable for a
wide range of analyses.  Parallel studies in  mammals are carried out where
appropriate.  Historically we have an interest in  the development of retinal topography
in humans, the distributions of neuronal  populations in the retina and their
neurotransmitters.  Presently the focus of  our studies is on the origins and functions
of the retinal microglia and their  role in ocular inflammatory disease.
TECHNIQUES USED
Histochemistry; Immunohistochemistry; Flow cytometry; Tissue culture; Electron 
microscopy.
KEY REFERENCES
Penfold, P.L., Provis, J.M., Madigan, M.C., Van Driel, D., & Bilson, F.A.  (1990).
Angiogenesis in normal human retinal development: The involvement of  astrocytes
and macrophages. Graefes Arch. Clin. Exp. Ophthalmol., 228:255-263;  Diaz-Araya,
C., & Provis, J.M. (1992). Evidence of photoreceptor migration  during early foveal
development: A quantitative analysis of human fetal  retinae.  Visual Neurosci., 8:
505-514, Penfold, P.L., Provis, J.M., & Liew,  S.C.K. (in press).  Human retinal
microglia express phenotypic characteristics  in common with dendritic antigen
presenting cells.  J. Neuroimmunol. 

NAME: Dr R Rajan
POSITION: Wright Fellow
ADDRESS: Psychology, Monash University, CLAYTON  VIC  3168 PHONE NO: (613)
565 3961
FAX NO: (613) 565 3948
EMAIL: irvine at monu1.cc.monash.edu.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Auditory; CNS/PNS neurophysiology; Neuronal and transmitter plasticity. RESEARCH
INTERESTS
Auditory system plasticity; Deafness; Cochlear efferents.
TECHNIQUES USED
Single-cell & multi-unit recordings in vivo; Gross nerve recordings in vivo. KEY
REFERENCES
Rajan, R. (1988).  J. Neurophysiol, 60, 549-568.;Rajan, R. (1988).  J.  Neurophysiol,
60, 569-
579.;Rajan, R. & Johnstone, B.M. (1988).  Brain Res. 459, 241-255.;Rajan, R.  (1989). 
Hearing Res, 39, 299-308.;Rajan, R., Aitkin, L.M., Irvine, D.R.F. &  McKay, J. (1990). 
J. Neurophysiol, 64, 872-887.;Rajan, R., Aitkin, L.M. &  Irvine, D.R. F. (1990).  J.
Neurophysiol, 64, 888-902.;Rajan, R., Irvine,  D.R.F., Calford, M.B. & Wise, L.Z.
(1992).  In: (Eds.) A Dancer, D .Henderson,  R. Salvi & R. Hamernik, "Noise-induced
hearing losses".  Mosby Yearbook, St.  Louis.;Rajan, R. & Patuzzi, R. (1992).  Hearing
Res. In press. 

NAME: Professor S J Redman
POSITION: Head, Division of Neuroscience
ADDRESS: Division of Neuroscience, John Curtin School of Medical Research, 
Australian National University, GPO Box 334, CANBERRA  ACT  2601 PHONE NO:
(616) 249 2602
FAX NO: (616) 249 2687
SUBJECT AREAS
Synaptic structure & function; Presynaptic & postsynaptic mechanisms. RESEARCH
INTERESTS
Synaptic transmission in CNS, including transmitter release mechanisms and  synaptic
plasticity; Electrotonic architecture of neurones. TECHNIQUES USED
Intracellular and whole cell recording; In vitro slice; Quantal analysis; Cable  theory
and computer reconstruction of neurone/s.
KEY REFERENCES
Sayer, R.J., Redman, S.J. & Andersen, P. (1989).  Quantal and single fibre  EPSPs
recorded from CA1 pyramidal cells in the guinea pig hippocampal slice.   Journal of
Neuroscience, 9(3), 840-850.;Sayer, R.J., Friedlander, M.J. &  Redman, S.J. (1990). 
The time course and amplitude of EPSPs evoked at synapses  between pairs of
CA3/CA1 neurons in the hippocampal slice.  Journal of  Neuroscience, 10,
826-836.;Redman, S.J. (1990).  Quantal analysis of synaptic  potentials in neurones of
the central nervous system.  Physiological Review,  70, 165-198.;Stuart, G.J. and
Redman, S.J. (1990).  Voltage dependence of  glycinergic synaptic currents in cat
spinal motoneurones.  Jounral of  Physiology, 420, 111-
125.;Stuart, G.J. and Redman, S.J. (1992).  The role of GABAA and GABAB 
receptors in presynaptic inhibition of Ia EPSPs in cat spinal motoneurones.   Journal
of Physiology, 447, 675-692.


NAME: Dr S M Rees
POSITION: Lecturer
ADDRESS: Anatomy, University of Melbourne, PARKVILLE  VIC  3052 PHONE NO:
(613) 344 5797 or (613) 344 5790
FAX NO: (613) 347 5219
SUBJECT AREAS
Development and plasticity; Cell Structure; Synaptogenesis, morphogenesis;  Sensory
systems; Somatosensory pathways; Spinal cord and somatic afferents;  Mammals.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Development of somatosensory pathways in the fetus; Brain development in 
abnormal conditions: intrauterine growth; retardation; fetal hypoxia. TECHNIQUES
USED
Light histology; Electron microscopy; Neuronal tracing; Immunohistochemisty (LM  &
EM).
KEY REFERENCES
Rees, S., Bocking, A. & Harding, R. (1988).  Structure of the fetal brain in 
experimental growth retardation.  J. Develop. Physiol.  10, No. 3, 211-225,  Rees, S. &
Harding, R. (1988).  The effects of intrauterine growth retardation  on the development
of the Purkinje cell dendritic tree in the cerebellar cortex  of the fetal sheep.  Int. J.
Develop. Neurosci.  6, 461-
469, Bisignano, M. & Rees, S. (1988).  The effects of intrauterine growth  retardation
on synaptogenesis and mitochondrial formation in the cerebral and  cerebellar cortices
of fetal sheep.  Int. J. Develop. Neurosci, 6, 453- 460.;Nitsos, I. & Rees, S. (1990). 
The effects of intrauterine growth  retardation on the development of neuroglia in fetal
guinea pigs.  An  immunohistochemical and ultrastructural study.  Int. J. Develop.
Neurosci. 8,  233-244; Rees, S., Rawson, J. & Nitsos, I. (1990).  Prenatal
development of  cutaneous afferent connections in the spinal cord of fetal sheep: A 
physiological and neurochemical study.  Molecular Neurobiology (1991), 5: 247- 249,
Development of immunoreactivity for calcitonic gene-
related peptide, substance P and glutamate in primary sensory neurons and for 
senotonin in the spinal cord of fetal sheep. Neuroscience, (1993) 54: 239-252. 

NAME: Dr Phillip J Robinson
POSITION: Senior Hospital Scientist
ADDRESS: Endocrine Unit; John Hunter Hospital, Locked Bag No1, Hunter Region 
Mail Centre, NEWCASTLE  NSW  2310
PHONE NO: (49) 214 371
FAX NO: (49) 214 394
SUBJECT AREAS
Second messengers; Biochemical pharmacoloogy; Synaptic structure and function, 
presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms; Neuroendocrine control: pituitary.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Role of PKC in neurotransmitter release.  Investigations into modulation of  release by
PKC and, in particular PKC substrates such as dephosphin and MARCKS  that might
mediate or modulate release; Role of cGMP-dependent protein kinase  (PKG) in
control of pituitary ACTH release.  This involves identification of  PKG substrates, and
activation of intracellular guanylate cyclase and cGMP. TECHNIQUES USED
Protein phosphorylation techniques: Protein kinase purification and assay; Gel 
electrophoresis and autoradiography; purification of substrates and  phosphopeptide
mapping; Determination of neurotransmitter or hormonal release  by HPLC or by RIA.
KEY REFERENCES
Robinson, P.J. (1992).  The role of protein kinase C and its neuronal  substrates
dephosphin, BÄ50 and MARCKS in neurotransmitter release.  Molecular  Neurobiology
Vol 5 (2-4), 87Ä142; Robinson, P.J. (1991).  Dephosphin, a 96,000  dalton cytosolic
substrate of protein kinase C in synaptosomal cytosol, is  phosphorylated in intact
synaptosomes.  FEBS Lett. 282, 388Ä392; Robinson, P.J.  (1991). Liu, J-P, Robinson,
P.J., Funder, J.W. and Engler, D. (1990).   The biosynthesis and secretion of
adrenocorticotropin by the ovine anterior  pituitary is predominantly regulated by
arginine vasopressing (AVP).  Evidence  that protein kinase C mediates the action of
AVP. J. Biol. Chem. 265(24):  14136-14142; Robinson, P.J., Sontag, J.M., Liu, J.P.,
Fyske, E.M., Slaughter,  C., McMahon, H.T. and Sudhof, T.C. (1993). Dynamin
GTPase regulated by protein  kinase C phosphorylation in nerve terminals. Nature, (in
press), Robinson, P.J.  (1992). Differential stimulation of protein kinase C activity by
phorbol ester  or calcium/phosphatidylserine in vitro and in intact synaptosomes. J.
Biol.  Chem., 267, 21637Ä21644.


NAME: Dr S R Robinson
POSITION: ARC Research Fellow
ADDRESS: Vision, Touch and Hearing Research Centre, Dept of Physiology and 
Pharmacology, The University of Queensland
PHONE NO: (617) 365 4086
FAX NO: (617) 365 4522
SUBJECT AREAS
Cell structure;Cell birth, migration and death;Endocrine, biochemical and 
pharmacological correlates of development;Neuronal and transmitter 
plasticity;Synaptogenesis, morphogenesis;Glia;Myelin;Structure and function of 
identified cells;Synaptic structure and function, presynaptic and postsynaptic 
mechanisms;Amino acids;Metabolism of transmitters and modulators;Retina and 
visual pathways;Brain metabolism;Comparative neuroanatomy;Birds;Mammals.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Mechanisms and principles guiding the development and assembly of the 
retina;Neuroglia: Their structure & function, with particular emphasis on  potential roles
in signal processing.
TECHNIQUES USED
Injection of living cells with fluorescent low-molecular weight dyes,  autoradiography,
immunohistochemistry, computer-aided 3-D reconstructions from  serial sections.
KEY REFERENCES
Robinson, S.R. (1991). Development of the mammalian retina. Neuroanatomy of the 
visual pathways and their development. B. Dreher & S.R. Robinson (Eds.). U.K: 
Macmillan, PP. 69-128; Robinson, S.R. (1992). Neuroglia: Brains as well as  brawn?
Today's Life Science. 4 (8) 18-23.


NAME: Professor L J Rogers
POSITION: Associate Professor, Head of Department
ADDRESS: Physiology, University of New England , ARMIDALE  NSW  2351 PHONE
NO: (67) 73 2485
FAX NO: (67) 73 3234
EMAIL: lrogers at metz.une.oz.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Learning and memory; Neuronal and transmitter plasticity; Endocrine,  biochemical
and pharmacological correlates of development; Retina and visual  pathways; Birds;
Mammals; Primates.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Neural plasticity and early learning, with particular emphasis on brain  lateralization.
TECHNIQUES USED
Behavioural testing; Fluorescent dyes and microscopy; Neurochemistry. KEY
REFERENCES
Rogers, L.J. (1991).  Development of Lateralization, In R.J. Andrew (Ed).   Neural and
Behavioural Plasticity.  Oxford University Press, Oxford.  pp. 507- 535; Rogers, L.J., &
Rajendra, S. (1993). Modulation of the development of  light-initiated asymmetry in
chick thalamofugal visual projections by  estradiol. Experiment Brain Research, 93(1),
89-94, Johnston, A.N., Rogers,  L.J., & Johnston, G.A.R. (1993).  Glutamate and
imprinting memory: the role of  glutamate receptors in the encoding of imprinting
memory. Behavioural Brain  Research, 54, 137-143.


NAME: Associate Professor J A P Rostas
POSITION: Associate Professor in Medical Biochemistry
ADDRESS: The Neuroscience Group, Faculty of Medicine, University of Newcastle, 
NEWCASTLE  NSW  2308
PHONE NO: (49) 215-615 or (49) 215-601
SUBJECT AREAS
Endocrine, biochemical and pharmacological correlates of development; Neuronal  and
transmitter plasticity; Synaptogenesis, morphogenesis; Synaptic structure  and
function, presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms; Amino acids; Second 
messengers; Transmitter receptors; Endocrine effects on the nervous system;  Muscle
and disorders of motor systems; Birds; Mammals.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity; Developmental changes in cellular 
structures and molecular mechanisms which modulate neuronal activity in brain  and
the factors which control these changes; Major current areas of focus are,  functional
changes in receptors for excitatory amino acids; The role of protein  phosphorylation
(particularly CaM-PK II) and dephosphorylation; The function of  the post-synatpic
density; the effects of thyroid hormone status on these  processes.
TECHNIQUES USED
Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation in subcellular fractions and  intact
cells; 1D and 2D gel electrophoresis; HPLC analysis of phosphopeptides; 
Immunocytochemistry (light, confocal and EM); Quantitative ligand binding;  Receptor
autoradiography; Isotopic and fluorescence assays of calcium uptake. KEY
REFERENCES
Weinberger, R.P. and Rostas, J.A.P. (1991).  The effects of zinc on calmodulin 
stimulated protein kinase II and protein phosphorylation in rat cerebral  cortex.  J.
Neurochem.  57, 605-614.;Koszka, C., Brent, V.A. and Rostas, J.A.P.  (1991). 
Developmental changes in phosphorylation of MAP-2 and Synapsin I in  cytosol and
taxol polymerised microtubules from chicken brain.  Neurochem. Res.  15,
637-644.;Sim, A.T.R., Dunkley, P.R., Jarvie, P. and Rostas, J.A.P. (1991).  
Modulation of synaptosomal phosphorylation/dephosphorylation by calcium is 
antagonised by inhibition of protein phosphatases with okadaic acid.  Neurosci.  Letts.
126, 203-206.;Rostas, J.A.P. (1991).  Molecular mechanisms of neuronal  maturation:
a model for synaptic plasticity.  In "Neural and Behavioural  Plasticity: the use of the
domestic chick as a model."  Ed. R.J. Andrew,  O.U.P., pp 177-211.;Kavanagh, J.M.,
Dodd, P.R. and Rostas, J.A.P.  [3H]MK-801  binding in immature and mature chicken
forebrain.  Neurosci. Letts. 134, 83- 87.;Heath, J.W., Glenfield, P. and rostas, J.A.P.
(1992).  Structural  maturation of the synapses in superior cervical ganglion of rats
continues  beyond 4 weeks of age.  Neurosci. Letts. In press.;Rostas, J.A.P. and
Dunkley,  P.R. (1992).  Distribution of multiple forms of calmodulin stimulated protein 
kinase II (invited review).  J. Neurochem.  In press.;Rostas, J., Kavanagh, J.,  Dodd,
P., Heath, J. and Powis, D. (1992).  Mechanisms of synaptic plasticity:  changes in
postsynaptic densities and glutamate receptors in chicken forebrain  during maturation. 
Mol. Neurobiol.  In press.


NAME: Professor M J Rowe
POSITION: Professor of Physiology
ADDRESS: School of Physiology & Pharmacology, University of New South Wales,
PO  Box 1, Kensington, SYDNEY  NSW  2033
PHONE NO: (612) 697-2549
FAX NO: (612) 313-6043
SUBJECT AREAS
Sensory systems;Somatosensory pathways.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Organization and Function of Somatosensory Areas of the Cerebral Cortex: One of 
the major aims has been to determine the extent to which the primary and  secondary
somatosensory areas (SI and SII) are organized in parralel or serial  streams for the
processing of tactile information. These studies in the cat  indicate that SI and SII are
driven largely or entirely by a dual system of  parallel thalamo-cortical projection
systems in contrast to primate species in  which tactile information is processed in a
serial scheme through the thalamus,  SI, and thence SII. Other aspects of this cortical
work are concerned with the  nature of tactile information processing within each of
these cortical areas,  including the quantitative analysis of coding characteristics of
neurons within  each cortical area (Bennett, Ferrington & Rowe, 1980, J.
Neurophysiol., 43,  292-309;Ferrington & Rowe, 1980, J. Neurophysiol., 43, 310-331).;
Tactile  Transmission across the Dorsal Column Nuclei (DCN): This work quantifies
the  transmission characteristics across the DCN for single, identified  somatosensory
afferent nerve fibers. The aims are to determine whether the  marked differences
between sensory fiber classes in their capacities to  contribute to perceptual
experience (Vallbo et al. 1984, Brain, 107, 727-749)  are attributable to differential
transmission of sensory signals through the  first central relay nucleus. This work
depends on paired, simultaneous  recording from intact, single identified sensory fibers
and their target  neurons of the DCN, i.e. a study of transmission in an identified 1:1
linkage.  Further analysis of integrative processing in the central target neuron is 
carried out when other identified convergent sensory fibers are recruited by  controlled
tactile stimuli; Comparative aspects of Sensory and Motor Areas of  Cerebral Cortex:
This work analyses the organization of sensory and motor areas  of cortex in
montrome, marsupial and placental species; Functional Development  of Tactile
Sensory Systems: Quantitative elctrophysiological analysis is used  to characterize the
functional capacities of tactile sensory systems in the  neonatal and early postnatal
animal (Ferrington & Rowe, 1982, J. Neurophysiol.,  47, 622-640).
TECHNIQUES USED
Electrophysiological recording with microelectrodes from single neurons within  the
somatosensory areas of the cortex and from subcortical neurones in the 
somatosensory pathways, in particular those of dorsal column nuclei (DCN). KEY
REFERENCES
Morley, J.W., & Rowe, M.J. (1990). Perceived pitch of vibrotactile stimuli:  Effects of
vibration amplitude, and implications for the neural coding of  vibration frequency.
Journal of Physiology, 431, 403-416; Morley, J.W.,  Crawford, E.N., Ferrington, D.G.,
Archer, J.S., Turnam, A.B., & Rowe, M.J.  (1991). A method for the generation of
complex vibrotactile stimuli. Journal of  Neuroscience Methods, 38, 47-50; Rowe, M.J.
(1991). Coding of tactile  information in the developing nervous system. In: The Fetal
and Neonatal  Brainstem: Development and Clinical Issues, Ed. Hanson, M.,
Cambridge  University Press, in press, pp.24.


NAME: Dr R A Rush
POSITION: Reader
ADDRESS: Physiology, Flinders University of South Australia, GPO Box 2100, 
ADELAIDE  SA  5001
PHONE NO: (618) 204 5238
FAX NO: (618) 277 0085
EMAIL: pzrar at flinders.edu.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Cell Structure; Cell birth, migration and death; Neuronal and transmitter  plasticity;
Glia; Diseases of the nervous system; Implants, neurotrophic; PNS;  Birds; Mammals;
Human; Smooth and cardiac muscle; Neuroimmunology. RESEARCH INTERESTS
Function of neurotrophic factors, in particular the laboratory is focussed on  the role
which is played by NGF and its homologues in the regulation of the  periopheral
nervous system.
TECHNIQUES USED
Immunohistochemistry; In situ hybridisation; Elisa quantification of  neurotrophins; Gel
electrophoresis; Polymerase chain reaction quantification of  mRNA; Micro surgery;
Neuronal culture.
KEY REFERENCES
Rush, R.A. (1984).  Immunohistochemical localization of endogenous Nerve Growth 
Factor.  Nature, 312: 364-367; Rush, R.A. et al (1989).  In IBRO Handbook  Series
"Methods in the Neurosciences".  Vol 12 - Nerve Growth Factors, Ed. R.A.  Rush,
J.Wiley & Sons, Chichester; Zettler, C., Head, R.J. & Rush, R.A. (1991).   Chronic
Nerve Growth Factor treatment of normotensive rats.  Brain Res. 538:  251-262.


NAME: Professor N R Saunders
POSITION: Professor of Physiology/Head of Department
ADDRESS: Department of Physiology, University of Tasmania, Sandy Bay Campus, 
Churchill Avenue, Sandy Bay , GPO Box 252C, HOBART  TAS  7001 PHONE NO:
(002) 20 2678
FAX NO: (002) 20 2679
EMAIL: n.saunders at physiol.utas.edu.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Cell birth, migration and death; Blood-brain barrier; Messenger RNA regulation,  gene
structure and function; Structure and function of identified cells;  CNS/PNS
neurophysiology; Spinal cord and brain stem; CNS; Comparative  neuroanatomy;
Mammals.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Proteins in fetal CSF; Development of barrier mechanisms in the developing  brain;
Plasma proteins and plasma-like proteins in tissues of developing  animals; Brain
development in marsupials; Trace metals and brain development. TECHNIQUES
USED
In vivo mammalian physiological recordings; isotope tracer techniques; 
immunocytochemistry; neuroanatomical techniques; cell and tissue culture; 
biochemical; molecular and immunological techniques for protein structure and 
function.
KEY REFERENCES
Saunders, N.R. (1992).  Ontogenetic development in Physiology and Pharmacology 
of the blood brain barrier.  Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology, Vol 3, Ed. 
M.W.B. Bradbury, Springer-Verlag pp 327-369; Habgood, M.D., Knott, G.W. & 
Saunders, N.R. (1992). The nature of the barrier permeability decrease during 
postnatal brain development in the rat. J. Physiol. 446, 502P, Saunders, N.R., 
Habgood, M.D., Ward, R.A., & Reynolds, M.L. (1992a). Origin and fate of fetuin-
containing neurons in the developing neocortex of the fetal sheep. Anta.  Embryol.
186, 447-486, Saunders, N.R., Balkwill, P., Knott, G., Habgood, M.D.,  Mollgard, K.,
Nichools, J.G., & Treherne, J.M. (1992b). Long-term survivla and  recovery from injury
in intact CNS of fetal rat in vitro. Proc. Roy. Soc. B.  250, 171-180.


NAME: Dr Peter R Schofield
POSITION: Senior Research Fellow
ADDRESS: Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, 
DARLINGHURST  NSW  2010
PHONE NO: (612) 361 2050
FAX NO: (612) 332 4876
SUBJECT AREAS
Amino acids; Transmitters and receptors in disease; Pharmacology of synaptic 
transmission.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Molecular Neurobiology/Molecular Pharmacology; Structure and function of  Glycine
and GABAa ligand-gated ion channel receptors; The aims of the research  are to
describe the detailed molecular mechanisms of receptor activation in  response to
ligand binding and the understand the role of receptor subtype  diversity in synaptic
communication;Projects include: defining agonist and  antagonist binding sites,
mechanisms of channel gating and desensitisation,  subtype heterogeneity.
TECHNIQUES USED
Molecular biology: cloning, expression and mutagenesis of receptor cDNAs;  Molecular
Pharmacology, ligand binding, structure function studies, modeling;  Electrophysiology:
activation, desensitisation and ion channel properties. KEY REFERENCES
Schofield, P.R., Darlison, M.G., Fujita, N., Burt, D.R., Stephenson, F.A.,  Rhee, L.M.,
Rodriguez, H., Ramachandran, J., Glencorse, T.A., Reale, V.,  Seeburg, P.H. and
Barnard, E.A. (1987).  Sequence and functional expression of  the GABAA receptor
subunits.  Nature, 328: 221Ä227; Pritchett, D.B.,  Sontheimer, H., Gorman, C.M.,
Kettenmann, H., Seeburg, P.H., & Schofield, P.R.  (1988). Transient expression shows
ligand gating and allosteric potentiation of  GABAA receptor subunits. Science, 241:
1306-1308;Vandenberg, R.J., French,  C.R., Barry, P.H., Shine, J. and Schofield, P.R.
(1992).  Antagonism of ligand- gated ion channel receptors: Two domains of the
glycine receptor a subunit form  the strychnine binding site.  Proceedings of the
National Academy of Sciences  U.S.A.  89: 1765-1769; Vandenberg, R.J., Handford,
C.A. and Schofield, P.R.  (1992).  Distinct agonist and antagonist binding sites on the
glycine receptor.   Neuron, 9: 491-496.


NAME: Dr A E Sefton
POSITION: Professor
ADDRESS: Dept of Physiology, University of Sydney, SYDNEY  NSW  2006 PHONE
NO: (612) 692 2659
FAX NO: (612) 692 2058
EMAIL: ann at physiol.su.oz.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Neuronal and transmitter plasticity;Synaptogenesis, morphogenesis;Glia;Retina  and
visual pathways;Transplants;Mammals.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Interests are in the visual system: its structure and function in the adult and  its
development. Recent research has concentrated on the development of the  retina
and the visual regions in the brain. Current interests focus on the  development of the
visual thalamus, with studies on the development of  geniculo-cortical and
cortico-geniculate connections as well as on GABAergic  cells within the dorsal lateral
geniculate nucleus (the major relay nucleus for  retinal information to reach the cortex)
both in normal and transplanted  nuclei. Similar developmental studies are planned (in
collaboration with Dr S S  Warton) for the superior colliculus. We have developed a
technique of  explanting retinae on to the chorioallantoic membrane of the developing
chick  embryo in order to study the differentiation and aspects of the development of 
retinal features. Our interest has focussed on astrocytes and we have recently 
demonstrated that retinal astrocytes are derived from neuropithelium outside  the
retina itself. We intend to continue using this preparation in order to  test the
properties of the putative retinal ganglion cell neurotrophic factor,  and to study the
factor in vivo. In collaboration with Dr T. Fitzgibbon,  studies are to be undertaken on
the thalamic reticular nucleus and its visual  interconnections.  We study the
physiological and anatomical basis of colour  and form perception in a new world
primate, the marmoset Callithrix Jacchus.   The marmoset provides an excellent model
to test current hypotheses about the  origins of colour-
specific responses in the primate visual system, because male marmoset monkeys 
are dichromats (colour bind) whereas most female marmosets, like most humans, 
have trichromatic colour vision.  Retinal anatomy is studied using  intracellular injection
and immunocytochemical techniques.  Single-cell  recording is visual nuclei is used to
compare the properties of cells in  dichromatic and trichromatic animals.
TECHNIQUE USED
Light and electron microscopy; dye injections; neural transplantation; retinal 
explantation; fluorescent and histochemical tracers; immunohistochemistry and 
immunocytochemistry.
KEY REFERENCES
Huxlin, K.R., Tuch, B.E., Sefton, A.J., & Dixon, G. (1990). Grafting of fetal  pancreata
into neonatal rat brain. Transplantation, 49: 857-861; Dixon, G., &  Sefton, A.J. (1991).
Ganglion cell survival in embryonic rabbit retina  transplanted to the midbrain of
neonatal rats. Experimental Brain Research, in  press; Sefton, A.J., Dreher, B., & Lim,
W.L. (1991). Interactions between  thalamic, callosal and associational projections to
the visual cortex of the  developing rat. Experimental Brain Research, 84: 142-158.


NAME: Dr H L Seldon
POSITION: Senior Research Fellow
ADDRESS: Dept of Otolaryngology, University of Melbourne, EAST MELBOURNE 
VIC   3002
PHONE NO: (613) 665 9582
FAX NO: (613) 663 1958
SUBJECT AREAS
Neuropathology;Auditory;Implants,neurotrophic;Mammals;Primates;Human.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
This lab works on the development of multichannel cochlear prostheses. Research 
includes neurophysiological studies on the mechanism of action of the implants, 
neuroanatomical studies on the effect of deafness on the auditory brainstem, 
biological studies on implant safety, and electrical engineering studies on  real-time
speech-processing strategies. By products include image-analysis  software and 3-D
computer modelling.
TECHNIQUES USED
Nissl and golgi-like stains;Image analysis;Extracellular recording. KEY REFERENCES
Seldon, H.L. (1988). Golgi studies on the human auditory cortex. In: Auditory 
Pathway, Eds. Syka, J. and Aitkin, L. (pp. 229-232). New York: Plenum Press. 

NAME: Professor B C Shanley
POSITION: Professor of Medical Biochemistry
ADDRESS: Biochemistry, University of Queensland, ST LUCIA  QLD  4072 PHONE
NO: (07) 365 4622
FAX NO: (07) 365 4699
SUBJECT AREAS
Neurochemistry and Neuropharmacology.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Neurochemical basis of alcohol tolerance and dependence; Neurochemical basis of 
alcohol-
induced brain damage; Alcohol and gene expression in brain. TECHNIQUES USED
Receptor ligand binding; In vitro autoradiography; Northern analysis; In situ 
hybridisation.
KEY REFERENCES
Hillmann, M., Wilu, P.A. and Shanley, B.C. (1988).  Effects of chronic ethanol 
exposure on the GABA-benzodionzepine receptor in rat brain.  Neurochem Int. 13, 
69-73.;Pietrzak, E.R., Wilu, P.A. and Shanley, B.C. (1990).  Interaction of  chronic
ethanol consumption and aging on muscarinic receptors in rat brain.  J.  Pharm. Exp.
Ther.  252, 869-874.;Le, F., Wilce, P.A. and Shanley, B.C. (1990).   Aunte
administration of ethanol suppresses pentylene-tetrazole- induced c-fos expression. 
Neurosci. Lett. 120, 271-274.


NAME: Dr A T R Sim
POSITION: Research Officer
ADDRESS: Neuroscience Group, Faculty of Medicine, University of Newcastle, 
NEWCASTLE  NSW  2308
PHONE NO: (049) 215 611
FAX NO: (049) 216 903SUBJECT AREAS
Neuronal and transmitter plasticity; Synaptic structure and function,  presynaptic and
postsynaptic mechanisms; Biochemical pharmacology; Interaction  between
neurotransmitters and neuromodulation;Second messengers; Transmitters  receptors;
Learning and memory;Birds; Mammals.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Main interest: The nature, regulation and function of protein phosphatases in  the
brain; Speficic Investigations: Characterisation of neuronal protein  phosphatase
subunits; Effect of extracellular stimulation on protein  phosphatase I (PP1) - inhibitor
1 in synaptosomes and brain slices; Effect of  extracellular stimulation on the activity
of PP1 and PP2A in synaptosomes and  brain slices; Subcellular localisation of
neuronal protein  phosphatases;Identification and characterisation of neuronal protein 
phosphatase substrates; The role of protein phosphatases in neurotransmitter  release
and receptor activation; Characterisation of novel inhibitors of  protein phosphatases
isolated from Australian Marine Invertebrates. TECHNIQUES USED
Protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation; Phosphopeptide analysis; Protein 
purification; Enzyme assays; Immunocythchemistry; Subcellular fractionation; 
neurotransmitter release.
KEY REFERENCES
Haystead, T.A.J., Sim, A.T.R., Honnor, R.C., Tsukitani, Y., Cohen, P., &  Hardie, D.G.
(1989). Effect of the tumor promoter, okadaic acid on  intracellular protein
phosphorylation and metabolism. Nature, 337, 78-81;  Hardie, D.G., Carling, D., &
Sim, A.T.R. (1989). The AMP-activated protein  kinase - a multifunctional regulator of
lipid metabolism. Trends in Biochemical  Sciences, 14(1), 20-23; Davies, S.P., Sim,
A.T.R., & Hardie, D.G. (1990).  Location and function of three sites phosphorylated on
rat acetyl-CoA  carboxylase by the AMP-activated protein kinase. Euro. J. Biochem.,
187, 183- 190.


NAME: Dr N R Sims
POSITION: Senior Lecturer
ADDRESS: Medical Biochemistry, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, ADELAIDE  SA 
 5001
PHONE NO: (618) 204 4242
FAX NO: (618) 374 0139
SUBJECT AREAS
Cellular aspects of disease; Amino acids; Metabolism of transmitters and  modulators;
Transmitters and receptors in disease; CNS; Brain metabolism;  Mammals.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
The primary interests of the laboratory are in energy metabolism of neural  cells and
the control of synthesis and release of some neurotransmitters in  normal and
diseased brain; A major focus in recent years has been on the  involvement of
modifications of these metabolic properties in nerve cell loss  following cerebral
ischemia; Interventions aimed at reducing the effects of  some of these changes are
currently being investigated as potential strategies  for ameliorating damage.
TECHNIQUES USED
Preparations studied include synaptosomes, brain mitochondria, brain slices and 
whole animal models of cerebral ischemia; Specific techniques include  subcellular
fractionation, HPLC with electrochemical detection, polarographic  oxygen analysis,
fluorometry, spectrophotometry, liquid scintillation counting  and light microscopy.
KEY REFERENCES
Sims, N.R. & Pulsinelli, W.A. (1987).  Altered mitochondrial respiration in  selectively
vulnerable brain subregions following transient forebrain ischemia  in the rat.  J.
Neurochem. 49, 1367-1374; Sims, N.R. (1990).  Rapid isolation  of metabolically
active mitochondria from rat brain and subregions using  Percoll density gradient
centrifugation.  J. Neurochem.  55, 698-707; Sims,  N.R. (1992).  Energy metabolism
and selective neuronal vulnerability following  global cerebral ischemia.  Neurochem.
Res. 17, 923-931.  Zaidan, E., & Sims,  N.R. (1993). Selective reductions in the
activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase  complex in mitochondria isolated from brain
subregions following ischemia in  rats. J. Cereb. Blood Flow Meta. 13, 98Ä104.


NAME: Dr A I Smith
POSITION: Head, Peptide Biology Laboratory
ADDRESS: Baker Medical Research Institute, PO Box 348, PRAHRAN  VIC  3181
PHONE NO: (613) 522 4373
FAX NO: (613) 521 1362
SUBJECT AREAS
Endocrine, biochemical and pharmacological correlates of development; Synaptic 
structure and function, presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms;Interaction  between
neurotransmitters and neuromodulation;Metabolism of transmitters and  modulators;
Opiates, endorphins, and enkephalins:Anatomy, biochemistry and  physiology effets;
Peptides: Localization, biosynthesis and processing,  metabolism, characterization and
physiological effects; Second messengers;  Transmitter receptors; Transmitters and
receptors in disease; Cardiovascular  regulation and regulation of other autonomic
functions; Endocrine effects on  the nervous system; Neuroendocrine control: Pituitary;
Neuroendocrine control:  Other; Stress, hormones and the automatic nervous system;
Mammals; Human. RESEARCH INTERESTS
The focus of this laboratory is very much to do with the pre- and post-  secretory
modification of signals and their interaction with specific receptors  in a variety of
endocrine and cardiovascular systems. They include: Structural  analysis of cardiac,
hypothalamic and pituitary peptides; Post-translational  processing of hypothalamic
and pituitary peptides in response to stress, and in  conditions of steroid excess;
Characterization, isolation and purification of  receptors for arginine vasopressin in
sheep pituitary glands; Exploration of  anomalous sequences, and
cardiovascular/metabolic effects, of neuropeptides in  the ob/ob mouse; Exploration of
the expression of cardiac hormones in addition  to atrial natriuretic hormone, which are
C-terminally amidated. TECHNIQUES USED
The peptide biology laboratory is well equipped with facilities for protein and  peptide
isolation (HPLC), peptide sequencing, amino acid analysis,  radioimmunoassay and
receptor binding studies.
KEY REFERENCES
Horton, R.J.E., Li, J.Y., Cummins, J.T., Smith, A.I., Shen, P.J., & Clarke,  I.J. (1990).
Morphine decreases LH secretion in ovariectomized ewes only after  steroid prining
and not by direct pituitary action. Neuroendocrinology, 52, 6,  612-617; Giraud, A.S.,
Clarke, I.J., Rundle, S.E., Parker, L.M., Funder, J.W.,  Simpson, R.J., & Smith, A.I.
(1991). Distribution, isolation, and sequence  analysis of the C-terminal heptapeptide
of Pro-enkephalin A (YGGFMRF), from the  ovine medianeminence. J. Neuroendo., 3,
2, 215-220; Shurkovski, L., Findlay,  J.K., & Smith, A.I. (1991). Identification of a
noncovalent  oxytocin/neurophysin I complex in the bovine ovary. J. Endocrinol., 128,
305- 314.


NAME: Associate Professor P J Snow
POSITION: Reader/Associate Professor
ADDRESS: Cerebral & Sensory Functions Unit, Dept of Anatomy, University of 
Queensland, ST LUCIA  QLD  4072
PHONE NO: (617) 365 2958 or 365 3056 or 371 0324
FAX NO: (617) 365 1299
SUBJECT AREAS
Neuronal and transmitter plasticity; Synaptogenesis, morphogenesis; Structure  and
function of identified cells; CNS/PNS neurophysiology; Synaptic structure  and
function, presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms; Interaction between 
neurotransmitters and neuromodulation.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
The Cerebral and Sensory Functions Unit is under the direction of Associate 
Professor Peter Snow. It is staffed by 3 full-time professional research staff  and 2
technicians. Its research concerns the anatomy, physiology, pharmacology,  plasticity,
psychophysics, evolution and disfunction of neural systems involved  in somatic
sensation. The following projects are currently in progress: (a) the  effects of
peripheral nerve injury on central neural connections, (b) the  contol of synatogenesis
in pain pathways, (c) the extrathalamic and prefrontal  modulation of cortical input, (d)
the cortical representation of pain, (e)  identification of the modulators of spinal
nociceptive input and (f) pain  perception in primitive vertebrates.
TECHNIQUES USED
Extrathalamic and prefrontal modulation of cortical input, (d) the cortical 
representation of pain, (e) identification of the modulators of spinal  nociveptive input
and (f) pain perception in primitive vertebrates. KEY REFERENCES
Snow, P.J., & Wilson, P. (1990). Blind axonal endings and plasticity in the  mammalian
CNS. News in Physiological Sciences, 5, 215-219; Plenderleith, M.B.,  Cameron, A.A.,
Haller, C.J., & Snow, P.J. The coexistence of neuropeptides in  the single synaptic
terminals within the mammalian dorsal horn. Synapse, 6,  344-350; Snow, P.J., &
Wilson, P. (1991). Plasticity in the Somatosensory  System of Mature and Developing
Mammals. Progress in Sensory Physiology. Vol.  11, pp. 1-464. Springer Verlag,
Heildeberg.


NAME: Mr Z-M Song
POSITION: PhD Student
ADDRESS: Human Physiology, Flinders University of South Australia, GPO Box 
2100, ADELAIDE  SA  5001
PHONE NO: (618) 204 4140
FAX NO: (618) 277 0085
SUBJECT AREAS
Transmitters and neuropeptides-chemical coding.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Intronsic innervation of the mucosa and smooth muscles of the guinea-pig small 
intestine; Connections and neurocircuits in the enteric nervous system. TECHNIQUES
USED
Orgometypic culture of the whole-thickness intestine; Retrograde tracing with 
fluorescent dyes; Immunocytochemistry (electronmicroscopy),  Immunohistochemistry
(fluorescent microscopy).
KEY REFERENCES
Song, Z-M., Brookes, S.J.H. and Costa, M. (1991).  Identification of myenteric 
neurons which project to the mucosa of the guinea-pig small intestine.   Neuroscience
Letters. 129: 294-298.;Song, Z-M., Brookes, S.J.H., Steele, P.A.  and Costa, M.
(1992).  Projections and pathways of submacous neurons to the  mucosa of the
guinea-pig small intestine.  Cell and Tissue Research (In  press).;Llewellyn-Smith, I.J.,
Song, Z-M., Costa, M., Brett, D.S. and Snyder,  S.H. (1992).  Ultrastructural
localization of nitric oxide synthase immuno  reactivity in the enteric neurons of
guinea-pig ilerum.  Brain Research (In  press).


NAME: Associate Professor C Straznicky
POSITION: Associate Professor of Neuroanatomy
ADDRESS: Anatomy and Histology, School of Medicine, Flinders University, GPO 
Box 2100, ADELAIDE  SA  5001
PHONE NO: (618) 275 991 ext 4280
FAX NO: (618) 277 0085
SUBJECT AREAS
Cell birth, migration and death; Retina and visual pathways; Comparative 
neuroanatomy; Reptiles; Amphibia; Birds.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Microanatomical and Developmental studies on the Anuran Retina; The present 
research includes the light microscopy and ultrastructural characterization of  amacrine
cells using immunohistochemistry; The classification of retinal  ganglion cells on the
basis of their dendritic morphology; Development and  generation of
immunocytochemically characterized amacrine cells; The formation  of the non-uniform
cell distribution in the ganglion cell layer, inner nuclear  layer and photoreceptor layer
and retinal comparative anatomical studies in  anura, lizards and chicks.
TECHNIQUES USED
Immunohisto- and cyto-chemistry; Retrograde labelling of ganglion cells with  HRP and
fluorescent dyes; Intracellular injection of retinal neurons; Computer  assisted
morphometry.
KEY REFERENCES
Zhu, B.S., & Straznicky, C. (1990). Morphology and distribution of serotonin- like
immunoreactive amacrine cells in the retina of Bufo marinus. Vis.  Neurosci., 5,
371-378; Zhang, Y., & Straznicky, C. (1991). The morphology and  distribution of
photoreceptors in the retina of Bufo marinus. Anat. Embryol.,  183, 97-104; Zhu, B.S.,
& Straznicky, C. (1991). Morphology and retinal  distribution of tyrosine
hydroxylase-like immunoreactive amacrine cells in the  retina of developing Xenopus
laevis. Ana. Embryol., 183, 231-243. 

NAME: Dr K S Trker
POSITION: NH&MRC Research Fellow
ADDRESS: Department of Physiology, University of Adelaide, GPO Box 498, 
ADELAIDE  SA  5001
PHONE NO: (618) 228 5328
FAX NO: (618) 232 5669
EMAIL: kturker at gina.science.adelaide.eu.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Motor systems and sensorimotor integration.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Reflex responses of single human motor units; Electrical and mechanical  stimulation
of peripheral receptors; H-reflex, periodental reflexes and  cutaneous reflexes are
investigated in my laboratory.
TECHNIQUES USED
Single motor unit recording; Surface electromyography; Electrical & mechanical 
stimulation of receptors.
KEY REFERENCES
Miles, T.S., Turker, K.S. and Le, T.H. (1989).  In reflexes and EPSPs in human 
soleus motor neurones.  Experimental Brain Research, 77: 628-636; Turker, K.S.  and
Miles, T.S. (1990).  Cross-talk from other muscles can contaminate EMG  signals in
reflex studies of the human leg.  Neuroscience Letters, 111: 164- 169; Turker, K.S.
and Miles, T.S. (1991).  Threshold depolarization  measurements in resting human
motoneurones.  Journal of Neuroscience Methods,  39: 103-107, Brodin, P., Trker,
K.S. & Miles, T.S. (1993). Mechanoreceptors  around the teeth evoke inhibitory and
excitatory reflexes in the human  masseter. Journal of Physiology (In print).


NAME: Dr Vaegan
POSITION: National Health & Medical Research Council, Senior Scientific Officer
ADDRESS: Eye Clinic, Prince of Wales Hospital, High St, RANDWICK  NSW  2031
PHONE NO: (612) 399 4170 or 365 2279
FAX: (612) 399 6191
SUBJECT AREAS
Neuronal and transmitter plasticity; Cellular aspects of disease; Glia;  Structure and
function of identified cells; Aging; CNS/PNS neurophysiology;  Diseases of the nervous
system; Neuropathology; Amino acids; Transmitters and  receptors in disease.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Clinical visual electrophysiology with special emphasis on responses  originating from
the innermost retinal layers, including: The oscillatory  potentials; The pattern
electroretinogram in animals and man; The scotopic  threshold response in animals
and man; Psychophysical correlates of and  substitutes for electrophysiology, including
spatial and temporal contrast  sensitivity; Effect of age, disease and chemical and
surgical lesions; Major  diseases: Optic atrophies; Glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy;
Techniques to  enhance the analysis of the above responses, including: Electrode
design and  fabrication; Statistical database management for large data sets; Linear
and  nonlinear systems analysis of waveforms ; Data reduction by estimating 
parameters of equations derived from models; Factors and discriminant analysis  of
large data sets.
TECHNIQUES USED
Psychophysics; Evoked potential recording; Intraretinal miroelectrode  recording.
KEY REFERENCES
Sutter, E.E., & Vaegan. (1990). Lateral interaction component and local  luminance
nonlinearities in the human pattern reversal ERG. Vision Res., 30,  659-671; Vaegan,
Arora, A., Crewther, S.G., & Millar, T.J. (1990). The effect  of various anaesthetics on
the spatial tuning of two major wave peaks in the  transient pattern electroretinogram
of the cat: Evidence for pattern and  luminance components. Vision Res. 30(10),
1401-1407; Vaegan, & Sutter, E.E.  (1990). Fundamental differences between the
nonlinearities of pattern and focal  electroretinograms. Doc. Ophthalmologica, 76,
13-25.


NAME: Dr D F Van Helden
POSITION: NH&MRC Senior Research Fellow/Senior Lecturer
ADDRESS: Faculty of Medicine, The University of Newcastle, University Drive, 
CALLAGHAN  NSW  2308
PHONE NO: (049) 21 5626
FAX NO: (049) 21 6903
SUBJECT AREAS
Excitable membranes and synaptic transmission.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Neural control of blood vessels; Smooth muscle/endothelial interactions;  Lymphatic
pumping; Cellular mechanisms involved in pacemaking or sensory  sensation.
TECHNIQUES USED
Electrophysiology using intracellular, patch and extracellular electrode  recording
procedures; Confocal microscopy; Calcium imaging procedures. KEY REFERENCES
Van Helden, D.F (1988).  Electrophysiology of neuromuscular transmission in 
guinea-pig mesenteric veins.  J. Physiol. 401, 469-488.;Van Helden, D.F.  (1988).  An
alpha-
adrenoceptor mediator chloride conductance in mesenteric veins of the guinea- pig.  J.
Physiol.  401, 489-501.;Van Helden, D.F. and Woolridge, S. (1990).   Role of nerves
in hypertension.  Nature, 348, 118-119.;Van Helden, D.F. (1991).   Spontaneous and
noradrenaline induced transient excitatory potentials in the  smooth muscle of
guinea-pig mesenteric vein.  J. Physiol.  437, 511-541.;Van  Helden, D.F. (1990). 
Noradrenaline induced transient depolarizations in the  smooth muscle of isolated
guinea-pig mesenteric lymphatics.  Journal of  Physiology, 418, 173.


NAME: Dr P M E Waite
POSITION: Senior Lecturer
ADDRESS: School of Anatomy, University of New South Wales, PO Box 1,
KENSINGTON   NSW  2033
PHONE NO: (612) 697 2475
FAX NO: (612) 313 6252
SUBJECT AREAS
Somatosensory pathways; Development; Neurotoxicology; Marsupials; Human.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Trigeminal system; development, function and plasticity; Marsupial neural 
development; Olfactory pathway changes in aging and Alzheimer's disease.
TECHNIQUES USED
Light and electron microscopy; Electrophysiology; Immunohistochemistry. KEY
REFERENCES
Waite, P.M.E. and de Permentier, P. (1991).  The rat's postero-orbital sinus  hair: I
Brainstem projections and the effects of infraorbital nerve section at  different ages.  J.
Comp. Neurol.  312: 325-340; Waite, P.M.E., Marotte, L.R.  and Mark, R.F. (1991). 
Development of whisker representation in the cortex of  the tammar wallaby Macropus
eugenii.  Devel. Brain Res.  58: 35-41; Williams,  J.B., de Permentier, P. and Waite,
P.M.E. (1992).  The rat's postero-orbital  sinus hair: II Normal morphology and the
increase in peripheral innervation  with adjacent nerve section.  J. Comp. Neurol., 322:
213-223; Waite, P.M.E. and  Jacquin, M.F. (1992).  Dual innervation of the rat
vibrissae: responses of  trigeminal ganglion cells projecting through deep or superficial
nerves.  J.  Comp. Neurol., 322: 223-245; Waite P.M.E., Li, L., & Ashwell, K.W.S.
(1992).  Developmental and lesion induced cell death in the rat ventrobasal complex. 
NeuroReport, 6: 485-488.


NAME: Mr H J Waldvogel
POSITION: Research Officer
ADDRESS: Dept of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Auckland, Private  Bag 
AUCKLAND  NEW ZEALAND
PHONE NO: (619) 373 7599 ext 6051 or 373 7999
FAX: (619) 373 7484
SUBJECT AREAS
Transmitter receptors; Transmitters and receptors in disease; Mammals;  Primates;
Human.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Detailed chemical neuroanatomy of receptors and their transmitters in the  mammalian
(especially human) brain and spinal cord and the changes which occur  in these
receptors and neurotransmitters in diseases of the human brain such as  Huntington's
Chorea, Parkinson's Disease, Epilepsy and Alzheimer's Disease. TECHNIQUES
USED
Localization of neurotransmitters and receptors using immunohistochemical and 
molecular biological in situ techniques at the light and electron microscopic  levels.
KEY REFERENCES
Waldvogel, H.J., Faull, R.L.M., Jansen, K.L.R., Dragunow, M., Richards, J.R.,  Mohler,
H., & Streit, P. (1990). GABA, GABA receptors and benzodiazepine  receptors in the
human spinal cord: An autoradiographic and immunohistochemical  study in the light
and electron microscopic levels. Neuroscience, 39(2), 361- 385; Waldvogel, H.J.,
Faull, R.L.M., Williams, M.N., & Dragunow, M. (1991).  Differential sensitivity of
calbindin and parvalbumin immunoreactive cells in  the striatum to excitotoxins. Brain
Research, 546, 329-335, Waldvogel, J.J.,  Faull (1993). Compartmentalization of
parualbumin immunoreactivity in the human  striatum. Brain Research, 610, 311-316.


NAME: Dr D M White
POSITION: Research Fellow
ADDRESS: Anaesthesia and Pain Management, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. 
Leonards  NSW  2066
PHONE NO: (612) 438 8420
FAX NO: (612) 906 4079
SUBJECT AREAS
Neuronal and transmitter plasticity; PNS neurophysiology; Peptides: release; 
transduction mechanisms.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Our aims are to use a multidiscipline approach to investigaate the mechanisms  of
pain and hyperalgesia associated with inflammation and nerve injury. TECHNIQUES
USED
Cultured dorsal root ganglion cells; Radioimmunoassay; Immunocytochemistry; 
Electrophysiology; Behavioural studies.
KEY REFERENCES
White, D.M., Basbaum, A.I., Goetzl, E.J. and Levine, J.D. (1990).  The 15-
lipoxygenase product, 8R, 15S-diHETE, stereospecifically sensitizes C-fiber 
mechano-heat nociceptors in the hair skin of the rat.  J. Neurophysiol., 63:  966-970;
White, D.M. & Levine, J.D. (1991).  Different mechanical transduction  mechanisms for
the immediate and delayed responses of rat C-fiber nociceptors.   J. Neurophysiol. 
66: 363-368; White, D.M., Taiwo, Y.O., Coderre, T.J. and  Levine, J.D. (1991). 
Delayed activation of nociceptors: correlation with  delayed sensations of pain induced
by sustained stimuli.  J. Neurophysiol.  66:  729-734; Devor, M., White, D.M., Goetzl,
E.J. and Levine, J.D. (1992).   Eicosanoids, but not tachykinins, excite C-fiber endings
in rat sciatic nerve- end neuromas, Neuroreport, 3: 21-24, Ahlgren, S.C., White, D.M.
& Levine, J.D.  (1992). Increased responsiveness of sensory neurons in the
saphenous nerve of  the streptozotocin-diabetic rat, J. Neurophysiol., 68: 2077-2085. 

NAME: Dr P M Whitington
POSITION: Senior Lecturer
ADDRESS: Zoology, University of New England, ARMIDALE  NSW  2351 PHONE
NO: (67) 732 848
FAX NO: (67) 711 869
SUBJECT AREAS
Synaptogenesis, morphogenesis.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Development of the central and peripheral nervous systems in the embryo of 
Drosophila melanogaster.  Specifically, motor axon pathfinding and  neuromuscular
connectivity/formation of central projections from sensory  neurons; Evolutionary
change in mechanisms for neural development amongst the  arthropods.  Specifically,
a comparison of axon growth and neurogenesis in  different arthropods, including
myriapods (centipede), crutacea and insects. TECHNIQUES USED
Intracellular injection of identified neurons with fluorescent dyes; 
Immunohistochemistry; Real time monitoring and image enhancement of growing 
neurons; Embryo culture.
KEY REFERENCES
Sink, H. and Whitington, P.M. (1991).  Pathfinding in the central nervous  system and
periphery by identified Drosophila motor axons.  Development.  112,  307-316.;Sink,
H. and Whitington, P.M. (1991).  Early ablation of target  muscles modulates the
arborisation pattern of an identified Drosophila motor  axons.  Development.  113,
701-707.;Whitington, P.M., Meier, T. and King, P.  (1991).  Segmentation,
Neurogenesis and Formation of Early Axonal Pathways in  the Centipede
Ethmostigmus rubripes.  Roux's Archives for Developmental  Biology.  199, 349-363.


NAME: Dr J O Willoughby
POSITION: Associate Professor
ADDRESS: Dept of Medicine (Neurology), Flinders University and Medical Centre, 
BEDFORD PARK  SA  5042
PHONE NO: (618) 204 4187
FAX NO: (618) 204 5450
EMAIL:SUBJECT AREAS
Diseases of the nervous system, epilepsy; Mammals, rat.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Epilepsy: Fos immunohistochemistry is used to define active neurons in cerebral 
cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and brainstem projection neurons in animals with 
experimentally-
induced and physiologically-induced convulsive epilepsy.   The eventual aim is  to
define the cellular or synaptic disturbance causing convulsive epilepsy. TECHNIQUES
USED
Electroencephalography; Chronic recording; Double labelling  Immunohistochemistry;
Computer assisted enuronal mapping; Electrical brain  stimulation; Intravenous
catheter implantation.
KEY REFERENCES
Willoughby, J.O. & Mackenzie, L. (1992). Non-convulsive spike and wave  discharges
(absence epilepsy) in rat strains. Laboratory Animal Science, 42:  551-554,
Willoughby, J.O., Mackenzie, L., Hiscock, J.J., & Sager, S.M. (1993).  Non-convulsive
spike-wave discharges do not induce Fos in cerebro-cortical  neurons. Molecular Brain
Research, 18: 178-180.


NAME: Dr J Wye-Dvorak
POSITION: Research Fellow
ADDRESS: Singapore National University
PHONE NO: (065) 772 5813
FAX NO: (065) 777 7161
SUBJECT AREAS:
Retina and visual pathways; Birds.
TECHNIQUES USED
Excimer laser; Paraffin sections; Confocol microscope.
KEY REFERENCES
Wye-Dvorak, J., & Straznicky, C. (1991). Retinal distribution of ganglion cells  which
project to the ipsilateral optic tecturm in Fufo marinus. Brain research,  55: 313-318;
Wye-Dvorak, J., Straznicky, C., & Toth, P. (1992). Retinal  projections in the cane toad
Bufo marinus. Brain, Behaviour and Evolution, 39:  208-218, Gabriel, R., Staznicky,
C., & Wye-Dvorak (1992). GABA-containing  immunoreactive neurons in the retina of
Bufo marinus; evidence for the presence  of GABA-containing ganglion cells. Brain
Research, 571: 175-179, Vidyasagar,  T.R., Wye-Dvorak, J., Hentry, G.H., & Mark,
R.F. (1992). Cytoarchitecture and  visual field representation in Area 17 of the tammar
wallaby (Macropus  eugenii). J. Comp. Neuro. 325.


NAME: Dr G K Yates
POSITION: NH & MRC Senior Research Fellow
ADDRESS: Dept of Physiology, The University of Western Australia, NEDLANDS  WA 
 6009
PHONE NO: (9) 380 3321
FAX NO: (9) 380 1025
EMAIL: gyates at uniwa.uwa.edu.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Auditory; Mammals; Reptiles.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Peripheral Auditory Physiology: Mechanics of the outer/middle ear;  Hydrodynamics of
the cochlea; Basilar membrane mechanics; Auditory nerve  responses; Adaptation in
the auditory nerve; Mechanisms of frequency  selectivity; Otoacoustic emissions;
Otoacoustic distortion products. TECHNIQUES USED
Recording of otoacoustic emissions; Optical methods of displacement  measurement;
Microelectrode recording from auditory nerve; Cochlear  microphonics.
KEY REFERENCES
Yates, G.K. (1990). Basilar membranes nonlinearity and its influence onauditory  nerve
rate-
intensity functions. Hear. Res. 50, 145-162; Yates, G.K. (1990). The basilar 
membrane input-
output function. In, The Mechanics and Biophysics of Hearing, Proceedings,  Madision
WI, 1990, Eds. P. Dalls, C. D. Geisler, J.W. Matthews, M.A. Ruggero, &  C.R. Steele.
Springer-
Verlag, 106-113; Yates, G.K., Winter, I.M., & Robertson, D. (1990). Basilar  membrane
nonlinearity determines auditory nerve rate-intensity functions and  chochlear dynamic
range. Hear. Res. 45, 203-220, Yates, G.K. (1992). Peripheral  processing in the
mammallian codilea. Trends in Neurosci., 15, 57-61. 

NAME: Dr Shao-Wu Zhang
POSITION: Research Fellow in ANU
ADDRESS: Visual Sciences Group, Research School of Biological Sciences, 
Australian National University, PO Box 475, CANBERRA  ACT  2601 PHONE NO:
(616) 249 5094
FAX NO: (616) 249 3808
EMAIL: zhang at rsbs0.anu.edu.au
SUBJECT AREAS
Neural basis of behaviour; Visually guided behaviour.
RESEARCH INTERESTS
Visual information processing by biological nervous system, especially insect's  visual
nervous system and artificial system; Behavioural analysis and  mathematical
modelling; Neural network.
TECHNIQUES USED
Behavioural analysis; mathematical modelling; computer simulation;  neurophysiology
by microelectrode and optical techniques.
KEY REFERENCES
Zhang, S-W.  Analysis of Acceleration in Chasing Flight of the Male Housefly  with the
Aid of HSP.  Proc. SPIE Vol. 1032; Zhang, S-W (1989).  Architecture  and Algorithms
underlying Parallel Information Processing in the Visual Nervous  System.  In the
book, Learning and recognition - A modern Approach, pp. 87-96,  Word Scientific
Press.;Zhang, S-W. (1988).  Motion Cues Provide the Bee's  Visual World with a Third
Dimension.  Nature Vol. 332. p. 356-357; Zhang, S-W.  (1990).  Visual tracking of
Moving Target by freely Flying Honeybees.  Visual  Neuroscience Vol. 4, p. 379-386;
Zhang, S.W., Srinivasan, M.V., & Horridge,  G.A. (1992). Pattern Perception in
Honeybees: Local and Global Analysis, Proc.  R. Soc. Lond. B. Vol 248 p. 55-61;
Zhang, S.W., & Horridge, G.A. (1992).  Pattern Recognition in Bees: Size of Regions
in Spatial Layout. Phil. Trans. R.  Soc. Lond. B. Vol 337. p. 65-71; Horridge, G.A.,
Zhang, S.W., & O'Carroll, D.  (1992). Insect Perception of Illusory Contours. Phil.
Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B.  Vol 337. p. 59-64, Horridge, G.A., Zhang, S.W., & Lehrer, M.
(1992). Bee can  combine range and visual angle to estimate absolute size. Phil.
Trans. R. Soc.  Lond. B. Vol 337, p. 49-57; Zhang, S.W., Nagle, M., & Srinivasan,
M.V. Pattern  Recognition by using a Compound Eye-like Hybrid System. Proceedings
of the  Third Austalian Conference on Neural Network, ACNN'92, Srinivasan, M.W.,
Zhang,  S.W., & Chanderashekara, K. (1993). Evidence for Two Distinct Movement-
Detecting Mechanisms in Insect Vision., Naturwissenschaften, 80, 38-41,  Srinivasan,
M.W., Zhang, S.W., & Rolfe, B. Pattern Vision in Insects: Cortical  Processing?.
Nature. Vol 362. 8 April, 1993.



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