NervousSystem: Neuron Modeling & Simulation Tool

Daniel McFarlane mcfarlan at seas.gwu.edu
Fri Aug 5 17:33:41 EST 1994


We announce the release for free distribution of "NervousSystem
1.0.gwu"; a neuron modeling and simulation environment for Apple
Macintosh computers (application, source code, and documentation).

"NervousSystem" is a useful context for learning/teaching two popular
topics: computational neuroscience, and object-oriented programming
within a framework.


Here are the contents of the "Read Me" file.

*** ANNOUNCING: ***
NervousSystem 1.0.gwu -- Neuron Modeling and Simulation Environment for
Apple Macintosh  

*** WHAT: ***
NervousSystem is an exciting new simulation tool for exploring the
behavior of networks of neurons, based on a biological model.  
1.  Application (Apple Macintosh computers);
2.  User's Guide (MS Word format);
3.  Source Code & Project File (OOP using the Think Class Library
Framework);
4.  Programmer's Guide (MS Word format).

*** WHY (For Computational Neuroscience): ***
NervousSystem has the following attractive properties for investigating
a biologically based model of neurons and networks of neurons.
1.  free;
2.  it is VERY easy to learn and use (direct manipulation interaction
style);
3.  "easily" expandable and customizable because of well structured OOP
source code;
4.  free.

*** WHY (For Computer Science): ***
NervousSystem  has the following attractive properties for learning
direct-manipulation object-oriented programming within a framework.
1.  free;
2.  elegant direct-manipulation solution;
3.  employs "Model-View-Controller" paradigm;
4.  popular OOP language, C++ (Think Class Objects);
5.  popular framework (Think Class Library);
6.  popular, and inexpensive, development tools (Think C v.5, and
AppMaker);
7.  well crafted by OOP experts (two doctoral student in human-computer
interaction at George Washington University);
8.  robust, ample structure, supports expansion and reuse;
9.  free.

*** WHERE: ***
This software is now available by anonymous ftp from Info-Mac,
"sumex-aim.stanford.edu", in the directory, "sci".  The file is named
"nervous-system-10.hqx".  I suggest copying NervousSystem from a mirror
site, sumex is often too busy (for example, "grind.isca.uiowa.edu"
"mac/infomac/sci/nervous-system-10.hqx").

*** WHEN: ***
Now!!  (as of July 1994)

*** HOW: ***
It's free (and for non-profit use) -- Copy it by anonymous ftp!  
"NervousSystem.sea" is a self-extracting compressed file.  After
copying it to your local directory, double click on it. 
"NervousSystem.1.0.gwu.sea" will self-extract into a folder named
"NervousSystem".  The application, source, user's guide, programmer's
guide, and "Read Me" are located within this folder.

*** WHO: ***
Daniel C. McFarlane
The Naval Research Laboratory, Code 5513
Human-Computer Interaction Lab
4555 Overlook Ave., N.W.
Washington, D.C.  20375-5337
mcfarlan at seas.gwu.edu     (internet address)

Joe Geigel
Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center
BioMedical Group


*** DETAILS: ***
We release these NervousSystem products under the terms of the GNU
General Public License Version 2 as published by the Free Software
Foundation, Inc., 675 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA  02139,
617-876-3296.  (A copy of this license is included in the Programmer's
Guide.)

Please feel free to redistribute it as you see fit (according to the
provisions of the GNU General Public License).  Copyright (c) 1994,
Daniel C. McFarlane and Joe Geigel.

We hope that you will find this program useful.  However, there is NO
WARRANTY WHATEVER.  We do not offer any warranty or guarantee of any
kind, implied or otherwise.  

The uncompressed "NervousSystem" folder will require about 5MB of hard
disk space.

I am curious about the future of NervousSystem.  If you copy it, and
are interested in it, please send me a note at mcfarlan at seas.gwu.edu
and just let me know who you are.





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