QUESTION: What level and type of UK degree is good for Neuro

Ian Reynolds ijr at prophet.pharm.pitt.edu
Wed Aug 31 16:31:58 EST 1994


In article <00983879.D4A80880.42 at hal.hahnemann.edu> anderson at HAL.HAHNEMANN.EDU writes:
>I am a student presently undertaking some research in neurology for a part of
>my UK Degree Course. I am interested in finding out what level of British Degreei.e. First/Two-One etc would be acceptable to carry out a PHD in the USA in thisfield. Any sort of information would be helpful to me at present. Should there
>be any English Neuro's working in the USA at present who have other valuable
>info on this subject - please reply.
>
>MX%"ANDERSON at HAL.HAHNEMANN.EDU"

I came to the US with a British BSc to do a PhD in 1982.  In my experience people over
here have no idea about degree classification, so even if you do a great job and
get a first they will not recognize its true merit :>(  However, the good news is that
a typical British degree involves more specialization than would be encountered with
an equivalent candidate with an American undergraduate degree, so that will make you an
attractive candidate.  It would also be a very good idea to take the Graduate Record
Exam (GRE) which you can do in Britain.  Although it will not be the only criterion for
admission it is a standardized test which will allow the institution to compare you to
other applicants in a simple minded numerical way.

I currently direct the PhD program in Pharmacology at the University of Pittsburgh, and
am involved in Neuroscience here too.  If you have any other questions I might be able 
to help

Ian Reynolds
University of Pittsburgh
ijr at prophet.pharm.pitt.edu



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