Hydrocephalus pt. w/120 IQ?

David Mckalip dmmckali at gibbs.oit.unc.edu
Tue Feb 1 08:45:53 EST 1994


In article <1994Jan31.232854.2978 at news.yale.edu>,
Yukiharu Hadeishi <YHADEISH at biomed.med.yale.edu> wrote:
>A friend of mine asked me if I knew anything about "an Englishman who had an
>above average IQ and no brain."  I told him he might have been thinking about

....>head was almost entirely filled with CSF.  His ventricles had compressed
his >cortex into a 1 mm thick layer, according to the prof.
>
....>anybody save the post?  And did it have citations?  Any help would bek



Someone posted a reference to this from Science.  It was either 12-12
-1980 or 12-12-90.  I believe it was 1980 but I entered it incorrectly to
my pocket casio!  Any way, I have seen a few cases of hydrocephalus with
thin cortical mantles.  Most of them function very poorly, but a few get
along o.k..  Any genius with a one mm cortical mantle is truly
exceptional.  Rekate published an algorithm for ventricular shunting of
patients with hydrocephalus who had cortical mantles less than 3.5 cm in
Clinical Neurosurgery 32:605, 1985.  This was based on some 1973 data from
Young et. al. (sorry, have no more details at this time) that demonstrated
those with cortical mantle less than 2 cm usually developed with I.Q.'s <
80 while those with normal I.Q.'s normally had cortical mantles > 2.8 cm.

Any other opinions out there?


David McKalip
Division of Neurosurgery
UNC-Chapel Hill



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