Temporal resolution of the brain

Bill Budd bill at frogmouth.bhs.mq.edu.au
Tue Nov 22 18:40:52 EST 1994


>> In article <3aei0b$76t at news.cs.brandeis.edu>, bradw at cs.brandeis.edu (Brad
>> Wyble) wrote:
>> > 
>> > More
>> > specifically, its easy for an individual to maintain a 60 Hz beat, but
>> > as the frequency decreases, it becomes increasingly difficult to stay
>> > with it and predict the next beat without maintaining an internal
>> > counting mechanism of some kind that divides the intervals between
>beats into
>> > subintervals.
>> 
>> 60 Hz?  As in 60 cycles per second?  I would be suprised if a human could
>> resolve individual acoustic events occurring at a rate above about 10-20
>> Hz.  Could you please expand upon this statement?  If it's true, I would be
>> very interested in finding out more.
>>   
>
>Betcha the original poster meant 60 beats per _minute_, which is about as
>slow as is easy to count regularly.  A really slow piece of music, like a
>funeral march, is around 60 bpm. 
>
>Hannah
>

Given that beat and frequency mean two different things maybe the
original poster did mean 60Hz. Whatever, (as suggested above) there is
no way anyone could resolve individual events at >10-20Hz. Sounds above
this frequency sound like a continuous noise (ie. Guttman and Julez
196?).

I would be interested in corresponding with anyone who is doing research
examining issues related to the temporal resolution of the brain,
especially anyone doing cognitive/behavioural/electrophysiological
research using auditory stimuli.

Also if anyone knows of a good psychophysical procedure to determine SL
as opposed to SPL (intensity threshold) and a procedure to determine
"delta f" (frequency difference threshold) I would consider putting you
on my christmas card list!

Regards Bill

bill.budd at mq.edu.au

-- 
bb
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