LTP and excitotoxicity

Fiberman william at neuro.usc.edu
Mon Oct 24 19:48:47 EST 1994


In article <1994Oct20.162010.9258 at alw.nih.gov> olds at helix (James Olds) writes:
>
>I have a problem with the underlying assumption here, ie that LTP = memory.
>Chuck Stevens held an informal poll at the Learning and Memory conference
>at Cold Spring Harbor last week. The question: How many of the attendees
>would be willing to bet all their money that in the end (ie when we
>understand how memory storage really occurs) LTP will turn out to have
>anything to do with it. The result: only about 50% of the neuroscientists
>there thought yes. It was very tongue-in-cheek, but the message was clear:
>the relationship between the man-made phenomenon we call LTP and real
>learning and memory remains to be proven.
>

\you have a good point.  What I like to know is this.  Is the stimulating
parameters one uses to induce LTP (like high frequency tetanus) occurring 
naturally?  Alternatively, if LTP occurs naturally in an animal, one should
able to see it in a slice without artificial stimulation.  Perhaps this has
already been shown, so pardon my ignorance.


-fm









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