More To Betty Martini

Peter Hood Peter at brentano.demon.co.uk
Sat Aug 12 03:18:05 EST 1995


In article: <Pine.NEB.3.91.950811145640.1871A-100000 at max.tiac.net>  Mark Gold 
<mgold at max.tiac.net> writes:

<chopped>

> Rifle,
> 
> You were doing much better when you stuck to discussion of 
> excitotoxins.  Whenever you talk about this study, you carefully avoid
> mentioning the title of the study:
> 
>   Walton, Ralph G., et al., 1993. "Adverse Reactions to
>     Aspartame: Double-Blinle Challenge in Patients From a
>     Vulnerable Population," Biological Psychiatry, Volume 34,
>     page 13-17.

<chopped again>

Thank you, Mark.  I begin to see a line of argument emerging.  I deduce from
the connection with biological psychiatric approaches that aspartame, if it
does indeed reduce 5HT turnover, will exacerbate the already abnormally low
5HT turnover in those subpopulations of depressed people with 5HT depression,
or enzyme/etc. malfunctions that mimic reduced 5HT turnover?

Incidentally, for the benefit of 'Rifle', a number of British physicians are
beginning to take Gulf War Syndrome seriously.  Moreover, it was in the 50's
fashionable to refer to ME/CFS/PVF as 'hysterical', as mass hysteria, as
_Royal Free Syndrome_ (meaning hysteria).  Those psychiatrists who diagnosed
this were I think largely psychoanalysts.  There are now some interesting
biological pointers to this particular conundrum, including reduced cerebellar
activity, an increase in activating neurotransmitters and neurohormones, and
a premorbid predisposition to depression.

Once again Mark, thank you.

-- 
Peter




More information about the Neur-sci mailing list