literature review topic (help)

Jerry Clayton claytonj at essex.hsc.colorado.edu
Sat Aug 26 20:05:52 EST 1995


Lisa,
One suggestion that might encompass discrete anatomical pathology and 
provide some interesting insights into function and approaches to 
correcting the deficits is to research the use of fetal transplants as a 
treatment for Parkinson's disease.  For the most part the disease 
results in the loss of the dopaminergic neurons within the area of the 
brain known as the substantia nigra.  These neurons send their processes 
into two other areas known as the caudate and putamen (or collectively 
called the striatum).  This is a major functional connection intimitely 
involved in the generation of motor activity.  Fetal substantia nigra 
neurons are placed into the area they normally grow into (caudate and 
putamen) and survive, grow and make new connections but most importantly 
they replace the dopamine that was lost in this area of the brain.  
Their effectiveness is not necessarily because they have made new 
connections but because they produce dopamine which diffuses away from 
the transplant and extended processes and biases the motor control 
system in such a way as to improve intentional activity.  This 
replacement of dopamine idea is also the rationale behind standard drug 
therapy where a precursor to dopamine is given to the patient.  
If you find this interesting and would like more information, references 
or have specific questions drop me a line.  Best of luck with your 
studies!
Jerry Clayton
Dept. Neurology
Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center
(jerry.clayton at UCHSC.edu)

lisao at psy.uq.oz.au (Lisa Olson) wrote:
>Hi guys ..
>
>I've got to do a literature review of some topic in neuroanatomy,
>and I was wondering if any of you could suggest a topic or area
>in which there have been some recent developments (preferably
>something having to do with pathology if possible). I've looked 
>through back issues of neuroscience periodicals but can't seem
>to find anything that I'm really interested in.
>
>Thanx,
>
>Lisa
>





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