EMS FOUL-UP IN CONNECTION WITH ANOXIA CASE IN SWEDEN

Hans Christian Eidenert hce at bahnhof.se
Wed Jun 28 13:23:03 EST 1995


Re: EMS FOUL-UP IN CONNECTION WITH ANOXIA CASE IN SWEDEN

Further to the discussion whether the dispatchers in Sweden have the
appropriate training to deal with emergency calls when a suicide attempt
is suspected I wish to state the following questions.

1. How come an ambulance is automatically dispatched with first priority
to a location when an automatic alarm (such as a firealarm) is put into
action when these alarms usually turn out to be false alarms? Why should
they not act on suspicions from relatives, friends, or neighbors where
there is no reason why those suspicions should not be genuine? Is there no
other safe way in which crank calls and false alarms could be discounted?

2. What is generally the educational and training requirement for
ambulance personnel in other countries around the world especially in
regard to dealing with cardiac arrests and subsequent breathing failure?

3. How should an ambulance be equipped to be able to deal with such
situations? Are most or all ambulances equipped to be able to handle such
emergencies?  

These are just some of the questions that I would be interested in finding
answers to in connection with my wife's case.

Here is a transcript of the fatal call number one to the 911 dispatcher:

911 dispatcher:   911.
Caller: Yes, hello.
911 dispatcher:   Hello.
Caller: I have received a call from Norrlandsgatan 20 in Uppsala.
911 dispatcher: Hmm.
Caller:  And I believe someone is committing suicide.
911 dispatcher: Hmm, I'll connect you to the Police, hold on.
Caller: Thank you (can hardly be heard). 

The Police arrives on location 21 minutes later.

When the ambulance arrives according to witness reports they take a very
long time to get the patient into the ambulance. One witness claims that
this takes around 30 minutes. There is a delay of approximately three to
four minutes during which timne the emergency personnel are looking for
the patient's identification documents (despite the fact that two persons
at the location know the patient well). None of those two follow the
patient in the ambulance to the emergency ward.

I am thankful for further comments via E-mail.

Christian



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