Is analgesia a consequence of anaesthesia?

Daniel F. Bossut dfb at med.unc.edu
Sun Mar 5 22:01:36 EST 1995


In article <127wvdm.1 at chiron.wits.ac.za>,
Mr Wessel van der Merwe <127wvdm at chiron.wits.ac.za> wrote:
>I'm currently looking at the concept of the origin of analgesia, if anyone 
>has any ideas (no matter how abstract) it would be VERY appreciated.
>I think there is some link with receptor action....
>
>Thankyou in advance...
>Wessel         (E-Mail: 127wvdm at chiron.wits.ac.za)

Ethimologically the 2 words are different;

AN-ALGESIA is the abolishment of pain (Algo in greek); an example of
analgesia is the football player who keeps playing not knowing he has a
broken bone, only to discover his trouble after the match. This is called
stress-induced analgesia. Another example in analgesia induced by
acupuncture which is often misnamed anesthesia.

Some children are born analgesic, without the nerve proper to sense pain
(they usually have many burns, postural deformations and arthritis)

AN-ESTHESIA is the abolishment of all senses including pain. It can be
local (dentist type of peripheral nerve block) or general (typical for
extensive surgery).





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