pain centers?

falvarez at desire.wright.edu falvarez at desire.wright.edu
Fri Mar 17 12:40:57 EST 1995


In article <3k9o3g$71k at news.ycc.yale.edu> jnilsen at minerva.cis.yale.edu (jnilsen) writes:
>From: jnilsen at minerva.cis.yale.edu (jnilsen)
>Subject: Re: pain centers?
>Date: 16 Mar 1995 16:13:36 GMT

>x011 at Lehigh.EDU wrote:
>: I think it is also important to recognize that pain can be lack of a signal
>: that use to me there.  Phantom limb pain is a good example.
>: Ron Blue

>Phantom limb isn't really lack of signal.  It's believed to be due to 
>hyperactivity of dorsal horn neurons in the deafferented region of the 
>spinal cord.  Ablation of these dorsal horn neurons (which would be lack 
>of signal) often reduces the pain.

> LordOsis            But what is normal if we're always different?
>                     Does that mean that we're the same as one and     
>                     one makes three a.m.-the witching hour of the dove?
> 

Additionally peripheral mechanims could be involved in the onset of phantom 
limb pain. The sensory neurons from the limb have only lost their peripheral 
terminations but their cell bodies are alive and well in the dorsal root 
ganglia. Moreover they now terminate in a neuroma. Consider this: stump 
manipulations, anesthetics, blood flow or removal of the neuroma all can 
modify or transiently suppress phantom limb pain.

Francisco J. Alvarez
Wright State University





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